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Old 04-20-2014, 06:07 PM
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Cavalry Cavalry is offline
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Default One Person Brake Bleeder

My wife is always less than happy to help bleed brakes. I tried vacuum bleeding but never could get a good seal on the bleeder. I have been wanting to make one of these for awhile and yesterday when I popped a brake line in my truck it seemed the ideal time to make one.
This could be built a hundred different ways but the idea is the same. I took a old garden sprayer and cut off the hose, adapted it to poly tubing, added a low pressure gauge, and made a master cylinder cap that would accept a fitting.
Hook everything up, pump the sprayer up to 5 psi, and crack your bleeders like normal. In addition to now being one person, I think it does it faster.
The Chinese cap I picked up is real brittle crap and cracked when I drilled it. It held a seal but I dont see it lasting. I will have to get a OE next trip to the boneyard along with caps for my other vehicles.
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Old 04-20-2014, 08:28 PM
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I saw that idea a while ago and thought, why did I not think of that 30 years ago when I did not mind crawling under a car.

Its still a good idea and nice to have around. An idea I had was make the unit like you did but use a low air pressure regulator and compressor to provide the air pressure instead of the hand pump.
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Old 04-20-2014, 08:50 PM
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Nice I have a sprayer just like that that I was gonna throw out but now it goes back on the shelf. I have the same problem with the vacuum pumps. I would suppose you still use a clear hose on the bleeder.

Ted
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Old 04-20-2014, 09:05 PM
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I rigged up a similar thing over 30 years ago for a '78 Cadillac. It had 4-wheel disc brakes.
It had a reservoir tub with a removable top which exposed the entire volume of fluid, like all GM's of the era, I think.
All I had to do was glue a piece of rubber to a flat aluminum plate & tap it for a quick connect then clamp it on with a chain. I used a air bottle with about 30 psi in it and a detachable regulator.

Still have it somewhere and I saw it recently when I was hunting for something else.
The rubber was peeling off the plate.
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Old 04-20-2014, 09:19 PM
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If you don't have the stuff on hand, you can find a piece of tube that'll fit snugly over the bleeder. The other end can go into a can, or other container with some brake fluid in it. Crack the bleeder and pump the brakes up. The air will bubble through the fluid, fluid will be drawn into the system when the pedal is released.
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Old 04-20-2014, 10:09 PM
MrRodeoCC MrRodeoCC is offline
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I bought everything to make one of these pressure bleeders, but I couldn't find a cap that would fit a VW Passat reservoir. So I had a friend help me bled them the old fashion way. I agree that it is a better process as there is no sudden stop of fluid flow that would let air gather in certain spots rather than stay in constant motion until it bleeds out.
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Old 04-20-2014, 10:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shopmonkey View Post
If you don't have the stuff on hand, you can find a piece of tube that'll fit snugly over the bleeder. The other end can go into a can, or other container with some brake fluid in it. Crack the bleeder and pump the brakes up. The air will bubble through the fluid, fluid will be drawn into the system when the pedal is released.

This is what I do as well. As long as there is some fluid in the container all you do is crack the valve and pump and brakes. Eventually the hose should be full of fluid and when it is clean fluid you can see it. Won't draw air back up into the system.
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Old 04-21-2014, 12:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shopmonkey View Post
If you don't have the stuff on hand, you can find a piece of tube that'll fit snugly over the bleeder. The other end can go into a can, or other container with some brake fluid in it. Crack the bleeder and pump the brakes up. The air will bubble through the fluid, fluid will be drawn into the system when the pedal is released.
They say that you shouldn't do this on systems with abs, something about dirty fluid not getting along with the pump. They also say you should change the fluid when you change the pads so you arn't pushing dirty fluid from the calipers into the pump, which I have personally never bothered with. However now that I have a car I want to keep for a long time I probably will. Anyhow just some food for thought.
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Old 04-21-2014, 12:47 AM
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Cavs talking about bleeding the brakes from the top down. Yes they make these things that will do it from the bottom up and yes it will mess with the abs, and the master cyl, and the proportioning valve as the junk in the system settles in the wheel cylinders/ calipers The nice thing about the lower pressure setup like this is that it moves the fluid a little slower. Thus not tripping any of the lights. The other good thing is that the sprayer has enough capacity to allow you a one fill up flush of the entire system.
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Old 04-21-2014, 06:38 AM
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The effects of the old fluid on ABS systems is news to me. Bleeding from the top does make more sense now.
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