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Old 05-15-2011, 09:48 AM
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Default engine turning?

OK I am looking for some information on what I think is called engine turning
The process looks like circles overlapping each other and done with a round wire brush in a mill It is an old school finish used in hot rodding in the 1950' and 60's and also on industrial instrument panels.
Thanks
Ray
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Old 05-15-2011, 09:51 AM
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Default tuning

I have seen in done with 3m scotch brite pads.
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Old 05-15-2011, 09:51 AM
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Default turning

I have seen in done with 3m scotch brite pads.
sorry typo
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Old 05-15-2011, 09:55 AM
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What do you need to know? I did mine a long time ago on a drill press with a wooden dowel and some abrasive. Never heard of using a wire brush. There are plenty of guys using lots of different methods, and they all seem to work. It is best, I think, to just try using whatever you have on hand to see if you get the results you want. I haven't tried it since I have had a milling machine, but I can see the advantage because of the consistent X Y movement. I am pretty sure you can find some sort of kit to do it at http://www.speedwaymotors.com/

Nope I was wrong, it was Eastwood.http://www.eastwood.com/ew-engine-tu...-diameter.html
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Old 05-15-2011, 10:05 AM
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Video here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tzN7QBlnpUI
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Old 05-15-2011, 10:08 AM
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Thanks guys
I found a video on it and the guy used rubberized abrasive dowels that worked well I am going to order some and will let you know how it turns out. I is for the instrument panel of the 1963 Mini cooper I did the back panel for.
here is a link to the video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jf5dqUIT-eo

Ray
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Old 05-15-2011, 02:47 PM
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Brownells should have something. Engine turning was done a lot on firearms.
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Old 05-15-2011, 05:43 PM
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Yeah, if you can afford a Cratex abrasive dowel that is good.
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Old 05-15-2011, 07:17 PM
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You can use any diameter round stock or dowel you want. Glue a piece of leather to one end and put the other end in the chuck of your drill press or mill. Brush some valve lapping compound on the object and lightly press the rotating leather down, lift, shift over, and repeat.

If your doing an aluminum surface, a wire brush will give good results. If the bristles are too soft and expand too much, a few wraps of electrical tape an inch from the end of the brush will tighten it up. You might have to experiment a bit to find what you like the best.

A mill or an X Y table makes it much easier and quicker.

Here's an example of the last piece I did.
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Old 05-15-2011, 07:44 PM
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Hey, Mack!
That's pretty.
We used dowel rod with a piece of emery cloth glued to one end. If you are not too heavy handed it will last a long time before needing replaced.
Experiment with different grits and see what you like before committing to one grit. I tried three of four different grits before settling on one. Run a pattern with the different grits as some will look alright in a small area but look strange in larger areas.
Dan.
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