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  #1  
Old 01-07-2010, 05:00 PM
rhinoabe rhinoabe is offline
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Default bushings and pins

I will be replacing the bushings and pins in my backhoe and i need to know what steel to use for my pins and if i will need to heat treat them? The bushing will be 2in DOM C1020 steel with a bore of 1.5 I have access to 1018,1045,1117 11L17,1215,A-36 steel for the pins.I also need to know how much clearance i need between the two.
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Old 01-08-2010, 02:19 AM
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GWIZ GWIZ is offline
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Welcome to the site, I don't have an answer.

That's a safety question so you may not get an answer. but this will bring your thread back up to the top.
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  #3  
Old 01-08-2010, 08:16 AM
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midmosandblasting midmosandblasting is offline
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There are several post on bushing replacement and the tools made to aliign bore them.
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Old 01-08-2010, 08:46 AM
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digger doug digger doug is offline
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Rhino,
Let's start with a couple of questions, numbered so you can
refer to them with answers:

1. How are you replacing the bushing's ? Burn out old with torch,
tack in position, and fill weld ? Or are there master bushing's
still intact, push out the worn bushing, press in new ?

2. Pins should be hard, both for wear, and strength.
The materials you listed are neither. Some you
listed are screw machine stock, stay way from welding
the leaded ("L") steels.

3. Heat treat bushings ? not if you weld them in. Pins ?
see #2.

4. Might I suggest some 4140-ht for the pins ? it's
already heat treated to Rc 28-30 so you can still cut it,
and drill cross pin holes, but has higher strength.
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Old 01-08-2010, 08:59 AM
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Tom Zachman Tom Zachman is offline
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Welcome to SFT, rhinoabe.

I don't really have your answer but I do have a lingering thought about what might become your 'liability' should a failure cause injury... so I would seriously look at the costs of using OEM materials to shift any liability onto their side of the table.
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Old 01-08-2010, 11:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Zachman View Post
Welcome to SFT, rhinoabe.

I don't really have your answer but I do have a lingering thought about what might become your 'liability' should a failure cause injury... so I would seriously look at the costs of using OEM materials to shift any liability onto their side of the table.

Tom,
I read it a little differently:
"I will be replacing the bushings and pins in my backhoe "

But if the backhoe is used on a job site, yes.
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Old 01-08-2010, 01:22 PM
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Machinist-Guide Machinist-Guide is offline
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Default 4140ht

I am with digger on the 4140.
A lot of reference books recommend 4140 for shafting material. The machinery handbook recommended .003-.004 for the fit you would need
Any time you run steel on steel one should be harder then the other.
It's OK for both to be hard but one should be harder then the other.
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Old 01-08-2010, 03:35 PM
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midmosandblasting midmosandblasting is offline
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In the plant we always used hard bushing and pins of 4130 prehard. Bushing would still wear.
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Old 01-08-2010, 06:16 PM
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1045 would work for the pins if they were pin stock, (hardened).

A good pin material is hydraulic cylinder rods. If you can find some of these they maybe just the ticket. Be sure and check they are hardened.

as to bushings. How are you setting them up?? grease fitting each side, bolts to hold in place, pinch bolts,

Same as to the pins. If you plan on only doing this once then you will want to use a material that can handle the abrasive properties of the environment.

If the pins are sealed (greased each day) then the pin and bushing material can be somewhat softer. (though remembering to keep the loads in relation to the materials used) and the pin should be harder than the bushings (reason is load dispersal). If you concentrate the load in the middle of and object the object is more likely to fail at that point. as you disperse the pressure(make the area larger) the pressure gets more distributed into a larger area. A pin bent in the middle will egg out a bushing in no time flat and will also stress fracture from being bent back and forth.

Most commercial pins are medium carbon, some of the track pins for bulldozers are a medium carbon and case harderened. Some are solid high carbon steel.

If Possible I use the equation of 1:1 1" to 1" as for area. Some would say even 2:1 2Xbushing to 1pin.


Not sure if I'm explaining this right. I can see it in my head but trying to put it down on paper is harder.
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  #10  
Old 01-08-2010, 07:44 PM
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I know the one manufacturer of attachments I've talked to told me they use 4140 for pins. I just bought new bucket linkage pins and bushings for my excavator, it was about $1400, not including new bucket pins. (Which should also likely be replaced, they are tired, but I may buy some stock and make my own.)

I also used H13 for pins in the past, hardened of course, I think it was hardened around 44RC if I recall correctly.

As far as clearances, it partially depends on the pin sizes too. The pins I made out of H13 are 30mm pins for a mini ex, and the ones I just got the bucket pins are 65mm...I think the bucket linkage pins are likely the same. The pins and bushings are still out in the shop, I could try to remember to measure them for you in teh next day or so and see what sort of clearance/fit they are.
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