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  #21  
Old 08-26-2009, 04:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cutter View Post
But it does not work on a Clausing 22.
I don't HAVE a Clausing 22. I do have a Rugar 22. Jerry
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  #22  
Old 08-26-2009, 08:48 PM
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Default I want a Hornady .17

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Originally Posted by OLD MAN View Post
I don't HAVE a Clausing 22. I do have a Rugar 22. Jerry
I seem to be feeling the need for one of the .17 calibers. They just look so cool! Maybe a high-end airgun instead?

The "trick" of swinging and spinning the drillpress table was common on the old camelback drill presses. They turned big drills into big parts. The procedure is a lot like using a radial drill. Drill presses get no respect, but it is amazing what you can build with just a welder and a drill press. Even if it does have a square table. It helps to know about the "old" tools like transfer punches/screws. Layout, and procedure is important. A friend needed two parts with matching hole patterns, not super critical as far as location, just had to match.

So, he thought I should do it on the mill, use digital readouts, etc... I tacked the two parts together and pointed him toward the drill press.

No nibbles on the use of a Wiggler? mark
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  #23  
Old 08-26-2009, 09:30 PM
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No nibbles on the use of a Wiggler? mark
NOT FROM ME.
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  #24  
Old 08-27-2009, 06:00 AM
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That vise looks familiar, along with the mounting plate. Doesn't Ringo get upset about the drill using his attachments???


Jack
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  #25  
Old 08-27-2009, 06:19 AM
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Jack, that plate gets removed more than you can believe just so I can show the underside. I also still have the other half which I keep so folks can see the difference. You have to remember that I live in a rural area and there are those who still don't believe it came from the same plate.

I probably would not have a mill if not for that plate. It started me down a road that led to the mill. It did work on the lathe but the cantilever problem limited it to very small cuts, and the size of the work was also limited.

I was slow with that vise for a long time and now it works almost as fast as any other. It is good quality and probably should be on a mill rather than the drill press but I have the Kurt on the mill so I decided to use this one on the drill press. I also have a cheap chi-com angle vise. If I have to use it I go to the mill.

By the way the switch is being installed on the mill today. I started yesterday and had to make a mount and get everything ready. I will finish it this morning. I run the air valve with my left hand so the switch will be on the right.
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  #26  
Old 08-27-2009, 10:59 AM
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I like your idea OLD MAN looks good and I will be sure to keep it in the old memory banks for the future.
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  #27  
Old 08-27-2009, 11:34 AM
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Default Wiggler use

This is a pretty good write up of using a wiggler. http://www.metalwebnews.com/howto/wiggler/wiggler.html But, the reason that a wiggler is better than just chucking up a small rod with a point on it is: The chuck on a big old drill press is often pretty shot. The wiggler, once you use your thumb nail and get the tip running "true", is thus located on the spindle bearing centerline. While a pointed rod is doing an orbit.

I spent several months running a massive radial drill press. Big angle Plate, Big rotary table, Big tilt table, Big flat table, all arranged at different positions around the center collum. (like numbers on a clock). Good test of your "old school" layout, and drilling methods. I was ~17, this radial drill was about a 1917 version. I started as a helper, for the bosses dad; He was real old school machinist (toolmaker). We got along great; he hated me and everybody else in the world, but I "Yes Sir - No Sir - Thank you, Sir, and worked real hard, (so he didn't have too), until he felt that I was (maybe) worth teaching a few things too. Learned a lot of the old ways of making big parts. mark
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  #28  
Old 08-28-2009, 12:00 AM
TONYL TONYL is offline
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Default wiggler

I personally think wigglers are a waste of time. I have used them and they do work well but any thing that I layout (on surface plate with height gage), and center punch I use the appropriate size lathe center drill to pick up my center punched hole (same 60 degree angle). I can get just as accurate results as a wiggler. If more accuuacy is needed i think it should be made on the mill. Now big parts on big radial drills is probably another story.

My wiggler is probably the most unused tool in my box. I would not spend the money one.

Just m2c

Tony
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  #29  
Old 08-28-2009, 04:03 AM
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GWIZ GWIZ is offline
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In a production shop a wiggler could be an indispensable tool.
I used one for years and still do, mills, radius and radial drills..........
I don't like picking up from center punch marks because they have a tendency of moving when punched.
Scribed lines don't move and if you take your time you can get better then .003.

Most wigglers (90%) are crap, you just need to find a good one.

My write up.
http://www.shopfloortalk.com/forums/...9&postcount=25
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  #30  
Old 08-28-2009, 05:03 AM
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I gave $2 for the same Craftsman wiggler set at an auction. I don't think it had ever been used.
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