Shop Floor Talk  

Go Back   Shop Floor Talk > Welding and Metalworking Forums > Machining

SFT Search:   
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 03-22-2009, 12:34 PM
GWIZ's Avatar
GWIZ GWIZ is offline
SFT Historian
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 7,003
Default Surface plate.

It's nice to have one setup with a height gauge.
using the scribe that comes with the height gauge you can blue up your part and scribe lines.
The lines are nice and sharp, they just don't look that good on the computer.

As for height gauges, its better if you can find one that has a carbide tipped scribe.
The height gauge, I purchased over 20 years ago. my choice would now be one with a counter and dial (easier to view).

Now if your parts are not wide enough to stand by it's self, you use an angle plate as a backing support.
If you buy an angle plate you want one that is square and true on all/every side to each other.
Every side parallel and perpendicular.
Some of the ones from ENCO are not square on all the sides (saw cut on the ends).
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	1 P3210195.JPG
Views:	281
Size:	64.2 KB
ID:	43658   Click image for larger version

Name:	2 P3210198.JPG
Views:	282
Size:	57.1 KB
ID:	43659   Click image for larger version

Name:	3 P3210202.JPG
Views:	283
Size:	63.8 KB
ID:	43660   Click image for larger version

Name:	4 P3210205.JPG
Views:	261
Size:	58.8 KB
ID:	43661   Click image for larger version

Name:	5 P3210223.JPG
Views:	239
Size:	31.4 KB
ID:	43662  

Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 03-22-2009, 12:36 PM
GWIZ's Avatar
GWIZ GWIZ is offline
SFT Historian
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 7,003
Default

Scribing the centerlines on a round piece is easy just set the height gauge at half the diameter and scribe across the center.
rotate the part and scribe a second line.

The last picture is just an example that all lines intersect in the center because the height gauge is set at half the diameter.
I was not trying to make equally spaced pie shaped lines.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	2 1 P3210212.JPG
Views:	211
Size:	60.9 KB
ID:	43671   Click image for larger version

Name:	2 2 P3210213.JPG
Views:	216
Size:	61.0 KB
ID:	43672   Click image for larger version

Name:	2 3 P3210231.JPG
Views:	206
Size:	59.0 KB
ID:	43673  

Last edited by GWIZ; 03-22-2009 at 12:43 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 03-22-2009, 01:31 PM
rmack898's Avatar
rmack898 rmack898 is offline
That HURT!
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Honu Grove (NE Florida)
Posts: 4,033
Default

G, I like the maginifier on the vernier in pic #2. Was that something that you put together or was it an off the shelf item that came with the height gage?
__________________
Mac
___________________________________________
One extremely happy former convict of the penal colony that lies between NY, PA, and DE. Now living the good life much further south. where they don't know what fucking Carhartts are.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 03-22-2009, 05:17 PM
GWIZ's Avatar
GWIZ GWIZ is offline
SFT Historian
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 7,003
Default

The magnifier came with the height gauge.
It would have been nice if it was larger so I would not need too slide it too see the total .025 Vernier scale.
At some time after this one they did start making the magnifier a larger rectangle.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 03-22-2009, 08:46 PM
kvom kvom is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Cumming, GA
Posts: 164
Default

A v-block makes a nice support for holding thing stock vertical on the plate.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 04-16-2009, 03:30 AM
GWIZ's Avatar
GWIZ GWIZ is offline
SFT Historian
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 7,003
Default Parallels

For beginners this machining stuff is new and unfamiliar.
I'm clarifying some questions.

This is a set of parallels I purchased from ENCO around 1996 when they had some outlet stores.
The catalog stated the set is parallel within .0002, Some of them were off .002 so I went back to the store with a micrometer and asked for another set. I checked the other set and it was worse. swapped a couple plates and kept the first set.
Good thing I was not expecting much for $18.

A good set of parallels should be better then .0002 parallel (basically matched pairs).

This set of parallels are all 1/8" thick and incremented in heights of 1/8" steps.

What are they used for ?
Too elevate anything above a surface while keeping the part parallel with the surface it was raised up from.
This 1/8" thick set is primarily used to elevate a part that's too short too clear the top of the vise jaws for machining.
also enables you to drill thru the part without drilling into the bottom of the vise.

When milling small parts, most of the time you need the part raised above the hard jaws so you don't cut into the jaws.
By having a set of parallels incremented in 1/8" steps in heights, it gives you a good selection of raising the part just above the jaw height and get as much of the part held by the jaws.

This also goes with surface grinders........ you need to grind a part, but its below the vise jaws, the parallels raise the part while keeping the part parallel with the bottom of the vise.

===
Caution, when you clamp something in a vise the part usually lifts up.
The parallels may move around while your cutting or you can unintentionally drill into them.
You should not remove the parallels.
If one side of the part was too tilt down the other end of the part tilts up higher (teeter-totter) and would make the cutter gouge into part, breaking the cutter or drill.
===
Sometimes you may need to tap on the part with a soft hammer as you tighten the vise.
The amount of lifting is related to the quality of the vise. It takes far less then 0.001 of lift and the parallels will be loose, it's up to the operator too know if it's safe. in other words, you have too know how crappy your vise is.
The Angle-lock vises have a wedge that the screw pushes and forces the moving jaw forward and down, that helps eliminate the part from lifting up. At least most of the time.

There are spring loaded gizmos that keep the parallels from moving. another project on my list to make.

Parallel keepers enco # 505-2235 KURT.
http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PMAKA=619-3388


Picture 4 shows a larger set of parallels under a part, they allow the boring bar to bore through the part without damaging the bed of the table.
There's also holes drilled thru that set which allow you to bolt them directly to the table for a square stop.

I could have also used 1x2x3 blocks for the same purpose.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	1 P4120219.JPG
Views:	193
Size:	59.8 KB
ID:	44651   Click image for larger version

Name:	2 P4120225 m.JPG
Views:	204
Size:	52.9 KB
ID:	44652   Click image for larger version

Name:	3 P4120234 m.JPG
Views:	207
Size:	66.7 KB
ID:	44653   Click image for larger version

Name:	4 P4040197.JPG
Views:	204
Size:	58.4 KB
ID:	44654  

Last edited by GWIZ; 06-16-2010 at 02:01 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 04-16-2009, 03:36 AM
GWIZ's Avatar
GWIZ GWIZ is offline
SFT Historian
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 7,003
Default Parallels

There's also angled plates. the pictures are self explanatory.

As a side note,
What works better then parallels in a vise, is having several soft jaws milled with steps. but that would usually be one step per set.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	2-1 P4120242.JPG
Views:	175
Size:	38.9 KB
ID:	44655   Click image for larger version

Name:	2-2 P4120246.JPG
Views:	178
Size:	65.6 KB
ID:	44656   Click image for larger version

Name:	2-3 P4120252.JPG
Views:	182
Size:	53.2 KB
ID:	44657   Click image for larger version

Name:	2-4 P4120253.JPG
Views:	188
Size:	61.4 KB
ID:	44658  
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 04-16-2009, 03:47 AM
GWIZ's Avatar
GWIZ GWIZ is offline
SFT Historian
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 7,003
Default

This part does not require any precision so milling up too my scribed lines is good enough.
With the scribed lines I don't have to read the dials.

This part is elevated by parallels in the vise so as not too mill or drill into the vise.
The vise is clamping about 3/8" of the 3/4" thick steel part. that's not alot but I know I can trust this vise.

I eye balled the center with my wiggler and drilled a 1/4" hole thru. At the time I was not sure what size hole I wanted but with a 1/4" hole I can find the center again with out any effort.


===
I have a smaller table top mill/drill.
I decided too use a 5/8" solid carbide end mill.
Normal surface speed would be about 250, that will come out about 1500 rpm.

Made a test cut at.
850 rpm.
0.230 deep.
Machine started chattering/growling (not enough rigidity) so I lowered the rpm to 440, that comes out to about 70 surface speed.
If I had a big solid machine the chattering/growling would be an indication that the feed (chip load) is too slow, not the rpm.
Yes big machines will also growl if the feeds and speeds are not right.

I'm holding the end mill in a collet, sometimes with heavy cuts the tool may pull out making a deeper cut.
I Raised the tool up 0.030, that makes the depth of the cut 0.200.
That leaves my finish pass with 0.050 stock.

I roughed the part at 440 rpm's, the end mill did not pull out, I could have just as easy removed the full 0.250.
The majority of heavy cuts were using 3/4 of the width of the cutter, at a depth of .200.
The finish pass was 0.050.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	1 P1010233.JPG
Views:	170
Size:	54.9 KB
ID:	44659   Click image for larger version

Name:	2 P1010234.JPG
Views:	169
Size:	59.5 KB
ID:	44660   Click image for larger version

Name:	3 P1010236.JPG
Views:	179
Size:	77.4 KB
ID:	44661   Click image for larger version

Name:	4 P1010240.JPG
Views:	191
Size:	58.7 KB
ID:	44662  

Last edited by GWIZ; 06-16-2010 at 02:13 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 04-16-2009, 03:48 AM
GWIZ's Avatar
GWIZ GWIZ is offline
SFT Historian
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 7,003
Default

(1), I had to stuff some paper between the parallels, just enough to stop them from moving.
Like I stated before it takes less then .001 of lift and they get loose.
it's also unsafe too remove them.
If one side of the part was to tilt down the other end of the part tilts up higher (teeter-totter) and would gouge into the cutter or break it.

(2), the finish pass. removing .050.

(3), a better view of the two parallels.

(4, 5), my finished spanner wrench.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	2-1 P1010244.JPG
Views:	177
Size:	69.5 KB
ID:	44663   Click image for larger version

Name:	2-2 P1010249.JPG
Views:	177
Size:	62.2 KB
ID:	44664   Click image for larger version

Name:	2-3 P1010251.JPG
Views:	181
Size:	61.7 KB
ID:	44665   Click image for larger version

Name:	2-4 P4020170.JPG
Views:	180
Size:	62.5 KB
ID:	44666   Click image for larger version

Name:	2-5 P4020171.JPG
Views:	181
Size:	49.2 KB
ID:	44667  


Last edited by GWIZ; 12-03-2009 at 12:20 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 04-16-2009, 04:39 AM
OLD MAN's Avatar
OLD MAN OLD MAN is offline

2-3-1940 to 3-8-2011
Nobody was faster
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: TEXAS
Posts: 12,577
Default

GWIZ, thanks for the tutorial. It was very informative. Now for the questions.
Why is the wire around the column? Do you think the dovetail is worth the expense over the round column? Is the spindle an R8? Do you think the R8 over an MT3/4 is worth the cost? Is a power table worth the cost? Are Balador Motors vs. imports worth the cost? Is .250" a normal cut on a mill?
Are you cooling with air?

thanks in advance, Jerry
__________________
You do the best you can with what you've got.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Web Search:

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:29 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions Inc.