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Old 12-25-2007, 04:44 PM
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Default Walter Big Buff II Kit 30-A 267

I've had this kit for a couple of years and it does a great job, plenty of power. I've only used it on stainless steel and aluminum. It is the same variable speed, 10amp, Walter machine as used on all their buffing, grinding, sanding kits. They are expensive, the machine itself is over $300 and is available in task specific speed ranges, mine is 2200-6500 rpm, the 30-A 269 kit model that platy spoke of is 1200-3700 rpm, and there are other models that run up to 10,000 rpm. In complete kit form they are much higher in price. Retail for this kit is ~$1000, I bought this one at an auction for $100. It can be had at Philly Tools/Walter 30-A-267 for $675. The 30-A-269 model that platy referred to can also be had atPhilly Tools/Walter 30-A 269 for $810.

Notice that this tool includes no safety guards of any kind. It never had one and a safety guard is not mentioned in the owner's manual. That is because a safety guard is to protect the user against breaking a grinding disk. Because this tool was not intended to use a grinding disk there is no guard for it. Do not run a grinding disk on this tool or any that is not specifically designed and OSHA approved to run one. It is also an OSHA violation and potentially subjects one to liability if they change to a guard different from the one that was designed and marketed for that specific tool.
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  #2  
Old 12-25-2007, 10:35 PM
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PM,

What kind of finishes can you get with the circular action of the buffer? I went with the other unit because some of the exhaust hoods have a very noticeable grain in the finish, that runs along the width of the hood, a circular acting machine wasn't going to give that kind if finish, where others had a mirror finish.

Jack
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Old 12-25-2007, 11:20 PM
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What you have is a "Graining Tool", it's primary intended use is to restore or create the traditional surface graining treatment found on most stainless steel weldments and panels. And like everything I've seen from Walther, it is among the best on the market. Along with the best comes a higher price, when paid it is readily appearant that the price is fair for what you get.

In my case, I was very fortunate to have found this one at an auction, In nearly new condition, much less to procure it for a scant $100

The one I have is a sander-polisher. It accells at the swirled patterns one sees as artistic surface treatments in elevators and some bathrooms. It is also among the best powered hand tools for varying degrees of mirror polishing stainless steel or aluminum weldments and panels that will wind up in semi-conductor fabs and some medical & pharmaceutical areas. The pads have an open snap in the center to position the pad in the center of the backer and the actual attachment is hook & loop making transitions to different grits easy, repeatable and fast. It is accomplished by moving through finer flap sanding pads and then though a finer grits of buffing compound on their own felt polishing pads. Obviously, it's primary intended use is to restore the finish after welding or forming. If the instruction manual is followed exactly regarding pressure, speeds, grits and such in relation to substrate type. A fine mirror polish can be achieved much faster & easier than any other powered-hand-tool method I have tried.

As you mentioned in the other thread, sanding generates a tremendous amount of heat and polishing is even worse. It is a process that is best done when you're in the right mood and not rushed or distracted. Otherwise, warpage will definitely result.
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Old 12-25-2007, 11:48 PM
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That might be a good tool for the bus nuts. Really, that's what they call themselves. They buy an old bus from Greyhound or whoever and convert them into motorhomes for themselves. It's really amazing, how many sites there are out there devoted to bus conversions. Lot's of interesting tales too. The last step, before hitting the road is, polishing all that stainless steel siding. Neat thing to do if you're rollin' in doe.


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Old 12-26-2007, 12:01 AM
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Rolling in doe? Really.
I guess most of us would probably run out of bucks.
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Old 12-26-2007, 12:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cutter View Post
Rolling in doe? Really.
I guess most of us would probably run out of bucks.
Hmmmm....
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Old 12-26-2007, 09:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cutter View Post
Rolling in doe? Really.
I guess most of us would probably run out of bucks.
We have an over-abundance of both.... Resulting in a plague of antler-rats and unthankful yard locusts.... The dang critters are slow to cross the road because so many visitors feed them and stop for them or wait for them to meander across the road. If you just bump a few with a big Dodge pickup, the rest get the idea to pick up the pace.:evil: (Not to mention, it can be therapeutic and downright fun ...):evil: They eat everything including sandstone. The problem is: They don't stop when the yard looks good, they keep going until they hit dirt. I have a small peach tree, the majority of which is worn on antlers and I've never even tasted the fruit. Those suckers eat it before it even gets ripe.... They even bang on the branches to get the upper fruit to fall. They are fun at first but become downright irritating after a few years of damaging yer stuff and crapping all over yer yard...
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