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Old 11-07-2007, 04:51 AM
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Default Which lathe to keep?

I currently have a Atlas 10x42 lathe. nothing special just your basic potmetal/flatway lathe. I have gone though the entire thing though, reground the bed, etc.

I am looking at a SB 9x48 (c9-10jr) I originally planned on buying it for the tooling for the atlas and selling the rest. After looking at it though it looks to be in very good shape! We all know construction wise the SB is an animal compared to an Atlas.

The limitations of the SB are one inch less swing, and the lack of a power feed. From what I have read the b model apron is a direct swap so I could make this a "B" for not a lot of money. The SB also had 1/2 the spindle speeds of the atlas. The SB has iron bearings where the Atlas has roller.

So what do you think?...no I cannot keep both!
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Old 11-07-2007, 05:16 AM
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While the "C" model can be made into a "B" model easily it does take more than a few parts to get you there. You'll need a replacement saddle, apron and slotted lead screw to make it work. If the cast iron bearings are in good shape, they'll provide years more service with accuracy and dependability without much of any trade off in camparison to the Atlas's roller bearings. Take your pick, and it may come down to a coin toss, they are both good little lathes.
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Old 11-07-2007, 05:27 AM
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While I would much rather have a SB over the Atlas, a model C would not be much of an upgrade over your Atlas. It's not to hard to convert the SB to a model B or even a model A, but the prices of the parts needed to do it have sky rocketed on flebay. In addition to an apron, you will need a set of change gears if you ever want to cut threads. If your needs for a better lathe are not urgent, I would keep looking. SB, Clausing, Sheldon, they're out there, it just may take some time to find the right deal.
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Old 11-07-2007, 09:08 AM
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Deciding on a lathe, the biggest factor is what you intend to do, what you have already done and did you at times need more than you had.

The last lathe I had was a Atlas 10 X 42. Had babbitt bearings. A good lathe but for what I did it was more than I needed. I sold it and now have a 9 X 24 Logan. Just right for what I do.

What do you mean by cast iron bearings? I think you mean babbitt inserts or poured in cast iron...
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Old 11-07-2007, 03:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moe1942 View Post

What do you mean by cast iron bearings? I think you mean babbitt inserts or poured in cast iron...
south bend did a oddball one on these lathes? I have never heard of it either until now reading up on this lathe.

Quote:
The headstock spindle and bearings were masterpieces of precision engineering and, given just a modicum of lubrication the hardened spindle and cast-iron bearings of the 8" Junior and "9-inch Workshop" models,(an ideal combination of materials, incidentally) appear to last almost forever.
http://www.lathes.co.uk/southbend/page3.html
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Old 11-07-2007, 03:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rmack898 View Post
In addition to an apron, you will need a set of change gears if you ever want to cut threads. If your needs for a better lathe are not urgent, I would keep looking. SB, Clausing, Sheldon, they're out there, it just may take some time to find the right deal.
this lathe comes with change gears, and a threading dial. I dont need a better lathe really. The atlas will suit most of my needs until I have enough real estate to get a bigger lathe. I plan on buying the other one for the tooling and got looking at this one and thinking that its probably a better foundation than the atlas.
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Old 11-07-2007, 03:38 PM
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that's a new one on me.. Bet one doesn't forget the lube. That would get expensive..
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Old 11-08-2007, 09:06 PM
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Quote:
The SB has iron bearings ...
Those bearings, and the flat belt drive, (in addition to lots of cast iron & three V-ways) are the reason that the 9" & 10" South Bends run without vibration. Most SB users go through "the ritual" before each lathe session ... grab the oil can, start at the headstock with the front & rear bearings, fill the QC gearbox, etc. Five minutes max, and it makes you look at every part (and possibly remove a chip or two).

I've looked at 9's & 10's that were older than dirt, started them, taken test cuts, etc. Asked the owner when the cups were last filled & got that blank look. Oil is drawn from the cups through a wick into the bearing shells, and remains there for years. It's still a good idea to fill the cups every time, but those machines will run for a long time between fills.

I'd get the SB. But I have a SB in the shop, so my opinion is not objective. They're a tough little machine. The photo below shows mine running the 1 3/4" boring bar. Not a lot of 10" machines that will tolerate that.
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