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Old 03-06-2013, 12:26 PM
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boilerman boilerman is offline
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Default Wood finish...refinish

Ok...I knew the day would come that I would have to refinish the Kitchen.
The problem is I am not sure of what was used before for a finish.
I was thinking a light sanding and a recoat with water based poly but figured I better ask in case I am missing something.
Am I thiniking right or should I go about this differnt.
Overall the cabinets are fine just the finish has wore after 37 years.
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Old 03-06-2013, 12:34 PM
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Lu47Dan Lu47Dan is offline
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Clay, I would suspect that it is a varnish and not polyurethane, so I would think that you would have to strip the old finish and than use the poly on it.
Not sure about that but I think that is correct.
Another thing you would have to do is degrease them anyway you do it.
Dan.
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Old 03-06-2013, 01:16 PM
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Those do look worn. You can do a light sanding. Start with 100 and lightly go over it until you get a white powder coming off. Follow up with 120 up to 220. Wipe them down with a tack rag and mineral spirits.
The trick to the rest of this is in how abraded the previous finish is. I've found that you can either strip the whole thing or sand this way followed by a stain. The stain and poly are oil based for this trick. Once you've wiped the doors etc down, used the oil stain with a foam brush. Apply liberally but not soaking. Wipe down lightly. Give the stain a couple days to dry and then apply gloss oil poly. I prefer the oil poly, it's more durable, floats out well and has a longer open time.
You won't need to have removed all of the previous finish as its age will give it some porosity when sanded. The stain should penetrate and the oil poly top coat can be sanded with 220 when dry. A second coat of even a semi gloss will then work out just fine. Kinda a short explanation of the process but I've had great results without having to strip with this method...of course I've done this when stripping wouldn't permit.
Ps..you can degrease with TSP first of course. Then the sanding as any grease will really clog up fine sand paper.
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Old 03-06-2013, 01:29 PM
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nah, screw all that---

screw some 20ga galvy decking to the walls, good forever......
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Old 03-06-2013, 01:38 PM
kbs2244 kbs2244 is offline
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Default Wood finish...refinish

Just do not try and do it with the doors still mounted.
Take them down and into the shop.

The big problem with kitchens is grease.
No matter how clean they look there is going to some in nooks and cracks.

With the doors on the bench you can do a good job of cleaning and you can do a good job on the frames also.
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Old 03-06-2013, 01:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shopsmith View Post
Those do look worn. You can do a light sanding. Start with 100 and lightly go over it until you get a white powder coming off. Follow up with 120 up to 220. Wipe them down with a tack rag and mineral spirits.
The trick to the rest of this is in how abraded the previous finish is. I've found that you can either strip the whole thing or sand this way followed by a stain. The stain and poly are oil based for this trick. Once you've wiped the doors etc down, used the oil stain with a foam brush. Apply liberally but not soaking. Wipe down lightly. Give the stain a couple days to dry and then apply gloss oil poly. I prefer the oil poly, it's more durable, floats out well and has a longer open time.
You won't need to have removed all of the previous finish as its age will give it some porosity when sanded. The stain should penetrate and the oil poly top coat can be sanded with 220 when dry. A second coat of even a semi gloss will then work out just fine. Kinda a short explanation of the process but I've had great results without having to strip with this method...of course I've done this when stripping wouldn't permit.
Ps..you can degrease with TSP first of course. Then the sanding as any grease will really clog up fine sand paper.
oil not water...will give it a shot in the bathroom first incase there is an OOOOOPPPSSSS.
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Old 03-06-2013, 02:46 PM
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I've done a few sets of cabinets and just did a light sanding and used water based poly. They turned out great. No smell either.
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Old 03-07-2013, 06:29 AM
shopsmith shopsmith is offline
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Yup, oil. Smelly and longer drying time but it's my choice. Water based poly is like latex paint to me. If it peels, it peels off in layers. Not the kind of finish I trust around wet surfaces. Every woodworker has an opinion on this and you'll get a million answers. But I know what I'd use.
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Old 03-07-2013, 07:56 PM
My-smokepole My-smokepole is offline
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As a painter I havent found a water born poly that will hold up. If you can spray laq or cat varnish is my weapon of Choice. Both dry fast to super fast.
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Old 03-07-2013, 09:31 PM
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Mild Steel Mild Steel is offline
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I have been woodworking for 30 year or so. I think finishing is the most difficult part for me. romove the cabinet doors before starting. As other people have hinted, preparation is key to success. Grease will ruin any finish. My recommendation is to thoroughly wipe the cabinets down with mineral spirits using a ScotchBrite pad. Wipe off the mineral spirits with a clean cloth or paper towel before it dries. Now sand lightly with 120, Wipe down with mineral spirits. Sand with 220 and wipe down with mineral spirits again. Let it dry 24 hours.

Now use a quality polyurethane of your choice. Oil takes a little longer to dry and gives a slight amber tone. Water base will dry quicker and dries more clear. Either one will give you a durable finish when it is dry with proper preparation. Let it dry according to the instructions on the can. Now sand lightly with 320 or 400 and wipe off the sanding dust with mineral spirits for oil or a damp paper towel for water base. Recoat following the instructions on the finish you chose. Let it dry for 7 days before you put the cabinet doors back on.

When you do the doors, make sure you position them horizontally to minimize runs. You can use a couple of boards with 2 nails pounded through them to support the doors while you finish them. Coat the back first, flip it and do the front. Do not try to put too much finish on at a time. Two light coats is way better than fighting runs with a heavy coat.
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