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  #21  
Old 07-16-2019, 01:06 PM
Steeveedee Steeveedee is offline
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Originally Posted by moose View Post
One more thing to consider and check. Are you sure the temp reading is correct? I have run across this issue troubleshooting a "hot" engine. Finally traced to a bad temp gauge reading.
I had the original gauge go bad and put in an aftermarket gauge which reads the same as a thermometer I have, so I'm thinking the new gauge is right (close enough). Also, I checked the thermostat for the opening temp in a pot on the stove. It opens right on temperature, so that verifies the gauge.

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Originally Posted by threepiece View Post
I'm surprised by the common belief that you need special machines to bend and otherwise process metal. The reality is for the most part, machines only make the job easier or faster, they do not make the job "possible". With some material you may already have on hand and a few tools you likely have both of these forming operations can be easily done on the bench.
Indeed. I ended up hand-forming the aluminum strap over a 5 gallon propane tank. Virtually kink-free. My thinking was that it's a lot easier to line the metal up in the brake instead of using wood and c-clamps, which I guess is what it's coming down to.

I bought a 4' X 8' sheet of hardboard for the template. It was the cheapest thing I could find.
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  #22  
Old 07-18-2019, 05:58 AM
FabberMcGee FabberMcGee is offline
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I'd just stop by a local HVAC sheet metal shop and ask them what they'd charge you to make an offset square to round transition. A few measurements is all it takes, radiator dimensions, fan diameter, how far the fan is from the radiator and where it is from center of the radiator (offset).

Any good sheet metal man can turn one out in just a few minutes and probably not cost you much more than buying the material at a box store. And it will be all one piece of metal.

My brother built one for a dirt track race car I was running one time in about 20 minutes after work one day including the 2 beers he drank while doing it. Instantly ended my heating problems. Of course, the other racers wanted them too and the ones who weren't too bashful (or proud) to ask got them.

I saw one of his apprentices in a grocery store line a few years ago, he said he's building them for the current crop of racers now. He's not in the sheet metal trade anymore after taking over his dad's fire sprinkler business. He uses whatever flat sheet metal he can scrounge, (old furnaces have a lot of flat sheets) cutting them out with snips and making his bends on stairs and hand rails most of the time. Charges a case of Budweiser just to keep from being pestered to death, haha. Done in a half hour or so.

Doing it in a sheet metal shop has the advantage of a rolled hem around the fan opening and nice folded flanges for attaching it.

Here's an example. Lots of fiddling around for a novice, but a sheet metal guy can breeze right through it.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RzaOTPOwZyU
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Last edited by FabberMcGee; 07-18-2019 at 06:07 AM.
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  #23  
Old 07-18-2019, 07:32 AM
jniolon jniolon is offline
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Steve, one thing to consider... if you make it in one piece will you be able to remove it without removing fan,spacer, belts etc. I had a 72 Ford with a 351. It had a fiberglass shroud that was one piece. After a couple of times stripping the front of the engine I cut it horizontal at the 9 and 3 o'clock position and added angle iron flanges to bolt it together. 1500% better ! Just a thought

john

this isn't mine but shows my point
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Last edited by cutter; 07-18-2019 at 07:54 PM. Reason: remove embedded image; upload attachment
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  #24  
Old 07-18-2019, 08:40 AM
Steeveedee Steeveedee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FabberMcGee View Post
I'd just stop by a local HVAC sheet metal shop and ask them what they'd charge you to make an offset square to round transition. A few measurements is all it takes, radiator dimensions, fan diameter, how far the fan is from the radiator and where it is from center of the radiator (offset).

Any good sheet metal man can turn one out in just a few minutes and probably not cost you much more than buying the material at a box store. And it will be all one piece of metal.

My brother built one for a dirt track race car I was running one time in about 20 minutes after work one day including the 2 beers he drank while doing it. Instantly ended my heating problems. Of course, the other racers wanted them too and the ones who weren't too bashful (or proud) to ask got them.

I saw one of his apprentices in a grocery store line a few years ago, he said he's building them for the current crop of racers now. He's not in the sheet metal trade anymore after taking over his dad's fire sprinkler business. He uses whatever flat sheet metal he can scrounge, (old furnaces have a lot of flat sheets) cutting them out with snips and making his bends on stairs and hand rails most of the time. Charges a case of Budweiser just to keep from being pestered to death, haha. Done in a half hour or so.

Doing it in a sheet metal shop has the advantage of a rolled hem around the fan opening and nice folded flanges for attaching it.

Here's an example. Lots of fiddling around for a novice, but a sheet metal guy can breeze right through it.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RzaOTPOwZyU
I can do it, it just won't be as nice as if a real sheet metal man did it is all. Interesting video!

Quote:
Originally Posted by jniolon View Post
Steve, one thing to consider... if you make it in one piece will you be able to remove it without removing fan,spacer, belts etc. I had a 72 Ford with a 351. It had a fiberglass shroud that was one piece. After a couple of times stripping the front of the engine I cut it horizontal at the 9 and 3 o'clock position and added angle iron flanges to bolt it together. 1500% better ! Just a thought

john

this isn't mine but shows my point
That's a great idea! In order to get the factory setup apart, I had to take the fan off, and lift the shroud and fan out together. Thankfully, it's something that only needed to be done 3 times in the last 10 years.

Last edited by cutter; 07-18-2019 at 07:56 PM. Reason: remove quoted image
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  #25  
Old 07-26-2019, 08:40 PM
NOBLNG NOBLNG is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FabberMcGee View Post
Here's an example. Lots of fiddling around for a novice, but a sheet metal guy can breeze right through it.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RzaOTPOwZyU
That is becoming a lost art with all the CNC plasma machines out there. Pretty much every HVAC shop has one now.
Steeveedee: you can get Hi-flow thermostats. I had to put one in my Willys p/u that has a 350 in it.
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  #26  
Old 07-27-2019, 07:04 AM
Steeveedee Steeveedee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOBLNG View Post
That is becoming a lost art with all the CNC plasma machines out there. Pretty much every HVAC shop has one now.
Steeveedee: you can get Hi-flow thermostats. I had to put one in my Willys p/u that has a 350 in it.
I'll get a pic of the shroud. It's installed, now. Not my best work, but it works.

Thanks for the suggestion on that thermostat. I'll check that out.

Added pics. I have temporarily used aluminum foil tape on the vertical edges of the gap between the radiator and the shroud until I get some metal bent and attached. It now runs 185º in all conditions- idling or pulling a hill. All that is left is to hook up my travel trailer and pull a hill on a hot day before I declare victory. This thing has run hot for years, but I'm going to make it cooperate with me. Once I get it licked for sure I'm either going to rebuild this engine (100k+ miles on it, it's getting tired) or put in a new 454. I haven't decided which way to go, yet.
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Last edited by Steeveedee; 07-27-2019 at 09:03 AM. Reason: added pics
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  #27  
Old 08-14-2019, 06:43 PM
FabberMcGee FabberMcGee is offline
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Saw a link to this on another forum, pretty simple way to do it.

https://www.route66hotrodhigh.com/FanShroud.html
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  #28  
Old 08-14-2019, 09:47 PM
Steeveedee Steeveedee is offline
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Originally Posted by FabberMcGee View Post
Saw a link to this on another forum, pretty simple way to do it.

https://www.route66hotrodhigh.com/FanShroud.html
That's a nice process and result! I'm not eager to do more work at this point, though. I'll probably do something if/when I go to pull the engine for rebuilding or replacement. The 20" fan I upgraded to leaves very little flat surface for air to "bottleneck" in the corners. I took it out last week after I charged the AC and ran it up the same steep hill with the AC on, and 70 MPH which is a lot of stress with a camper shell that's about 2 feet higher than the cab. It got up to 195º but no hotter by the top of the hill, and cooled down quickly after I crested it. Now, it's time to do it with the trailer, but I don't drive it over 55 MPH with the trailer.
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  #29  
Old 08-14-2019, 10:57 PM
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MetalWolf MetalWolf is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FabberMcGee View Post
Saw a link to this on another forum, pretty simple way to do it.

https://www.route66hotrodhigh.com/FanShroud.html
Yep, that looks like a fairly simple way of doing it not a lot of trouble shaping it... a metal fan shroud is far more work.
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  #30  
Old 08-15-2019, 12:46 AM
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MetalWolf MetalWolf is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steeveedee View Post
That's a nice process and result! I'm not eager to do more work at this point, though. I'll probably do something if/when I go to pull the engine for rebuilding or replacement. The 20" fan I upgraded to leaves very little flat surface for air to "bottleneck" in the corners. I took it out last week after I charged the AC and ran it up the same steep hill with the AC on, and 70 MPH which is a lot of stress with a camper shell that's about 2 feet higher than the cab. It got up to 195º but no hotter by the top of the hill, and cooled down quickly after I crested it. Now, it's time to do it with the trailer, but I don't drive it over 55 MPH with the trailer.
If I'm not mistaken that's an older early model engine. The running temp should be 180 and with the AC running it's going to raise the temp some up to around 195 So that seems pretty normal in the temperature range...
Now if your hitting temps of 200 to 230 then there might be some concerns there.
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