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  #11  
Old 04-27-2020, 09:56 AM
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That's definitely weird, but I guess being out in that new neighborhood they want to try and keep things on track from the beginning. Of course, some of it could be due to the lack of soil preparation they put into the entire community out there when they started building on it. If you float a big enough chunk of concrete on a cotton field, theoretically it won't move?!?

Red, I don't know how deep our frost line is out here but my water line is only buried 8" deep in some spots from the meter to the house. It gets a little cold in the winter and I only have warm water in the summer. But it never freezes, and I've never taken any special precautions to keep it from doing such. I get A LOT more movement on my foundation at my house due to rain/dry cycles. When the ground is wet, my windows and doors don't open correctly. When it's really wet the door locks won't engage properly. Fortunately it only rains like that a couple times a year so it's not an issue for too long.
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  #12  
Old 04-27-2020, 10:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dubby View Post
Red, I don't know how deep our frost line is out here but my water line is only buried 8" deep in some spots from the meter to the house.
My line to the barn is 5 feet deep and has frozen,
but it is a wet spot where it does freeze.
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  #13  
Old 04-27-2020, 02:10 PM
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Welp, Down here we build everything on a sand spit. Ground level (grade) changes with the rise and fall of the water table. Multi story buildings drive or pour pillars to the limestone heads, that passes for bedrock. This method is more used along the coast, rather than farther inland. The carpet bagger builders working around here pour the required foundation, and then stick build the town houses/condo's with white wood, that just rings the dinner bell for the termites et al. Its not uncommon for the payment book to outlive the house 3 to 1. (BTW in some areas, you cant get insurance against "Act of God" occurrences.)

Single family dwellings and commercial buildings (strip malls, auto repair, retail sales shops etc.) are built on stem wall foundations and cantaliever slabs.

If you can find my old "I've been shopping" thread, (I'm not sure it's still around) there are good pictures of how we do foundations here. Perimeter foundations 18" tall X 24" wide, with -6 re-bar is pretty standard up to 100 feet square. (not square feet)

Enough, back to watching people catching the utopians lying thru the lame stream media.

RED
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  #14  
Old 04-28-2020, 12:14 AM
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Had one casualty in digging the footers. They caught one of my pipes for the sprinkler system. No biggie, little 1" pvc, 2 couplers, little primer and glue, and we're back in business. Will throw some dirt back over it before they pour the slab so it's not against the concrete. Click image for larger version

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  #15  
Old 04-28-2020, 07:04 AM
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Just in time...
A little trick my mud contractor taught me, about pipes running thru or close to concrete. Slide a piece of foam pipe insulation onto the line, before the pour.
Keeps the mud from sticking to the pipe, allows for movement as the slab settles, (important on plumbing riser penetrations) and allows for easy replacement when necessary.

Just a thought.

RED
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  #16  
Old 04-29-2020, 10:14 PM
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Yeah, I cut one open and put it over the pipe. Couldn't slide it on before hand. Don't want that pipe against the concrete.

Concrete guys came today and put all the rebar and mesh in place. Supposed to have the inspection tomorrow and pour the slab on Friday. Wife and I spent the day at dad's house mowing and cleaning so we didn't get home before dark but I'll get pictures tomorrow.

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  #17  
Old 04-30-2020, 08:03 PM
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Inspections approved. Supposed to pour tomorrow. Wish I didn't have to work so I could be here to watch. Click image for larger version

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  #18  
Old 04-30-2020, 09:10 PM
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Hope the pour goes well!

I find the steps from the slab to the ‘footing’ interesting. In Ontario with ‘engineered’ slabs, they had to be tapered from the lower depth up to the slab on a shallow angle. Basically no sharp corners to create stress points for cracks to start.
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  #19  
Old 05-01-2020, 09:45 AM
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At least the weather forecast has chilled out a bit. We're only supposed to get up to 99° today. Estimates earlier in the week were 103°, and as high as 110°.

I enjoy watching a good concrete pour but somehow manage to get crap all over me just as much as the guys doing the actual work. I think if I ever have the opportunity to build a shop I'll just set up a camera and watch from inside
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  #20  
Old 05-01-2020, 10:06 AM
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That is some seriously high temps. That cement will be ready to start laying bricks on by lunchtime when the cement is poured.
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