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  #41  
Old 07-03-2020, 09:39 AM
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Shade Tree Welder Shade Tree Welder is offline
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Originally Posted by Lu47Dan View Post
Use screws not nails, I have both on the shop. The nails tend to loosen over time.
Find and download a copy of Fabral's installation manual, follow it's recommandation's.
Predrilling the fastening pattern saves time, it is counter intuitive. But it does.
Dan.
Screws are a definite, I had not thought about the pre-drilling that is a good idea!
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  #42  
Old 07-03-2020, 12:01 PM
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Pre drilling is a very good plan. You need to add extra screws around the perimeter but that is easy to do.
You end up with a roof with a very symmetrical screw pattern that is easy to inspect to find missed screws.
Pre drilling takes time but that is recovered when installing the tin. There should be fewer wandering screw starts to damage the surface and allow rust to begin.

Stack all relevent sheets in a pile with the bottom edge aligned lay out the screw pattern on the top sheet Then drill all sheets together with a 1/8 inch bit.
Get lots of bits because they get dull fairly fast.
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  #43  
Old 07-08-2020, 03:43 PM
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Originally Posted by terry lingle View Post
Pre drilling is a very good plan. You need to add extra screws around the perimeter but that is easy to do.
You end up with a roof with a very symmetrical screw pattern that is easy to inspect to find missed screws.
Pre drilling takes time but that is recovered when installing the tin. There should be fewer wandering screw starts to damage the surface and allow rust to begin.

Stack all relevent sheets in a pile with the bottom edge aligned lay out the screw pattern on the top sheet Then drill all sheets together with a 1/8 inch bit.
Get lots of bits because they get dull fairly fast.
+1

Another minor time saver is to drill one top corner with a 3/16" or 1/4" bit, big enough you can slide a hook into when you pull the sheets up off the ground.
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  #44  
Old 07-17-2020, 10:41 PM
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Everything but the house here is either tin or being tinned.
Three buildings have 1x4 strapping over shingles and tin on that.
The others are tin direct on the roof. Sheds and an open shelter.
No bill effects. Yet.
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  #45  
Old 07-18-2020, 03:51 AM
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I have the house, barn, garage, shop, tractor shed, and two other out buildings roofed in steel sheeting. Several thousand square feet of roofing in all.

My parents house was done 25 years ago by family. Dunno if the old roof was stripped or not. Nominal,pitch 12:12.

The barn was done with 1 x 4 strapping air nailed with 3 1/4" ring shank nails through a single layer of asphalt singles. Nominal pitch 4:12. Non vented roof as it is not heated. Took two of us two days 20+ years ago.

Garage was done over 2x4 purlins, took me roughly 3 days alone roughly 20 years ago. Nominal pitch 4:12. Again, not vented as it is not heated.

Shop was done over 3/8" plywood, took me roughly 2 days the same year as the garage. Nominal pitch 4:12. Used a vented ridge system as the shop has gas fired infrared heat.

Garden shed done over solid plywood deck some 20 years ago using cover sheets from garage and shop orders. Nominal pitch 12:12. Non vented as the bldg is not heated. Took me 1 1/2 days alone.

House built over new plywood deck. 16 years ago. Done by contractor. Has a single hip and valley. Nominal pitch 6:12. Vented ridge design. House designed for minimum number of vents through roof, as vents etc are potential leak points.

Tractor shed built by previous owner over 1x4 purlins using galvalume sheeting. Nominal pitch estimated at 2:12. Non-vented.

Pump house done roughly 12 years ago from scraps left from house construction. Nominal pitch 6:12, IIRC. Non vented.

All roofs were done with screws. The oldest roof on the tractor shed has a few random leaks due to low slope, and low rib sheeting.

IMHO, predrilling is a waste of time, and has the risk of scratching the finish from burs around the holes if the sheets are allowed to rub together at any time during installation. At most, a simple layout with a tape and sharpie will keep the screw pattern neat, but anyone reasonably competent can line up screws by eye well enough the keep the pattern looking good.

All the screw I have used have a sharp point that does not require a starter hole. The screws also have a factory installed gasket washer. I have used both # 10 and # 12 screws with success. The best screw placement is in the valley. Took me 3 roofs and almost 10 years to find a manufacturer's recommendation for screw pattern. As a result, every roof on the place has a slight variation in pattern. All have been successful except the low slope galvalume roof mentioned elsewhere. Pay attention to driving torque. Over driving screws can cause seal issues almost as bad as under driving.

Working over purlins requires extra care to avoid bends when working on the roof. Much better to work over solid decking, unless stripping old roofing is deemed to labor intensive.

Cutting steel roofing can be done with common shears. Leaves very few burs. Longitudinal cuts can be done up valleys of the roofing using a straight edge and utility knife. Cutting with a circular saw might seem easier, but is noisy, has the potential to scratch the finish with the sole of the saw, and leaves a vicious ragged burr on the cut.

A note on handling long sheets.... If buckling the sheets is a consideration, loosely rolling the sheet will stiffen it enough so it won't buckle when handled, a loose rope tie will keep the sheet rolled while handling individual sheets.

As mentioned, keep an eye on the squareness. Nothing uglier than having a crooked edge. The ribs give away any misalignment along the rake....

No issues to date using ridge vent system. Minimizes roof penetrations which minimizes potential leak points. Get good advice on how to seal around vents. A good design will not rely on sealants for water proofing. Sealants have a 10 year life, so why use a 10 year seal on a 50 year roofing material?

Overall, I am happy with our steel roofs. The only ones that are particularly noisy are left open below the roof deck.

Random comment.....I can't let a vehicle idle in the garage in winter. Moisture from the exhaust condenses and freezes on the underside of the roof sheeting. That frost thaws when the roof warms and causes it to rain inside the otherwise weather tight building. No big deal, just back the vehicle out after starting.

Roofs steeper than 4:12 require a degree of caution as the roof can be slick if wet or greasy. Anchor points that attach to the roof structure are available and are required by code up here. The only time I has issues with feeling safe. Worst was when the new roofing had oil on it from the factory. Nearly ended up on the ground.

Snow will slide off any roof steeper than about 2:12 in sheets several inches thick during warm spells to pile up on the eave side of a building. Openings on the eave sides should give one pause backing out of the garage over the compacted ridge of snow can be a bitch. The compacted snow is a pain to deal with. Even up here, it is easier to melt the ridge with ice melter than remove the almost solid ice ridge. Snow retainers are available or you can design around the snow issue by putting doors in the gable ends, or under a dormer. Nothing worse than having several hundred pounds of snow fall on you while you fumble with your keys unlocking the front door. Another thing wrt the snow sliding off, is that if the eavestrough is too high, the snow will bend the eavestrough at best, or tear the eavestrough off altogether-ask me how I know that one.

My 0.02$ CDN, since you asked.
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Last edited by camdigger; 07-18-2020 at 04:27 AM.
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  #46  
Old 07-18-2020, 04:07 AM
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As a learning exercise for my son and I, we built a small 5x9 standing seam metal roof from a partial roll of 24" flashing using a 12' portable siding brake. Interesting exercise to make the roof sheeting and all the edge trim with just a utility knife, tape, framing square, and the brake. Shears were used to notch the peak trim around the standing seam.. No issues noted to date.
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  #47  
Old 07-18-2020, 08:36 AM
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Originally Posted by camdigger View Post
I have the house, barn, garage, shop, tractor shed, and two other out buildings roofed in steel sheeting. Several thousand square feet of roofing in all.

Another thing wrt the snow sliding off, is that if the eavestrough is too high, the snow will bend the eavestrough at best, or tear the eavestrough off altogether-ask me how I know that one.

My 0.02$ CDN, since you asked.
Very good post.

Another thing worth mentioning is the sand that sheds off an asphalt shingle roof over time and collects in the eaves trough and impedes flow so crap collects.
Never happens with a steel roof.
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