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  #111  
Old 08-25-2011, 09:30 PM
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I've often thought it could be done since that's exactly what Mustang motorcycles have for a transmission. A British gearbox mated to a side shaft engine...

This fellow gutted a Yamaha 100 by removing the piston,crank,cylinder,& head. He then added a shaft with a gear & chain sprocket in place of the crank....bingo a 5sp gearbox & presumably a clutch also.

He only gave a general discription of what he did,but listed his email for questions & pictures. If he answers I'll share the info if anyone is interested. Personally I thought it was a great idea and was glad to see he was willing to share his results.

A junk bike with a trashed cylinder/motor,but good gearbox ought to be a simple thing to acquire..and cheap too
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  #112  
Old 08-25-2011, 09:42 PM
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I'm interested.
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  #113  
Old 08-25-2011, 09:52 PM
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Fair enough... Here's the link to the tip as I found it which describes what he did and includes his name and email if you care to contact him as well. Read the description and see if you can visualize exactly what he did... It's the very first tip posted in Jan. of this year so perhaps it's still available for discussion.

http://www.hobbytech.com/cushman_hin..._tips_page.htm
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  #114  
Old 08-28-2011, 07:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cutter View Post
2Easy, I really hate to interrupt the flow for you but please read the first item in our FAQ.
OOPS, sorry about that Cutter. Reading the instructions falls into the many other gender-related anomalies that beset me so once in a while it does catch up to me in an unflattering way.

I do have a few more Cushman pics to post tho if I may.

To explain this photo a little (or rather to explain the lack of information for it) I have a little history in my back ground with stock-car racing here in west-central Florida so I’m always on the lookout for local racing photos from back in the day.

This photo was given to me several months ago with a bunch of local stock car pics from back in the 60’s. It was the only drag racing pic of the bunch.

I do not know who this is in the photo but I do know where it was taken. It was shot at Twin City Dragway on South Mobley Road, Oldsmar, Florida, Circa 1960’s (now defunct & long-gone).

The object of the photo of course is the guy on the Harley Drag Bike who appears as though he’s just completed his pass. What got my attention though is the chase vehicle parked behind him.

A Cushman Silver Eagle.

Man I’d love to own that thing now.
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  #115  
Old 08-28-2011, 07:32 AM
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The sweetheart shown below belongs to my good friend R.M. “Whitey” Westcott.

Whitey collects antique pickups, specializing in mid-50’s Chevy’s & GMC’s among others, and this Cushman is (or to be accurate was) part of his collection.

This is a 1966 Cushman Silver Eagle 9 HP OMC. I know; the experts are going to say they stopped making Silver Eagles in 1965. However according to Whitey this machine was part of a dozen ordered in 1965 by the Shriners for parades and were ultimately shipped to St. Petersburg, Florida in 1966. This machine is titled 1966.

This machine is all original with 10K miles on it and has not been restored.

According to Whitey this is one of two that’s left over from that original order. The other one allegedly is in a museum in Tallahassee, Florida.

Whitey has owned this scooter since the early 90’s, then sold it a year or so ago but still stores it along with his truck collection for the new owner.

For those that are curious that old red & white panel truck with “Big 3 Truck Salvage” on the side on display at a show beside the Silver Eagle is a 1950 Mercury Panel with all original drive line. Whitey sold that truck about 2-years ago.

Hope you enjoy the pics;
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  #116  
Old 08-29-2011, 11:46 AM
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That's a super fine example of an Eagle... he's a lucky guy to have it around.

I often wonder what the Shriners use today to substitute for the old Cushmans. The two almost always went together.

As far as the Eagles go...I prefer the old barrel spring Eagles over the newer models. The more Cushman added to them the less attractive they became. That's strictly my own opinion and I know others really like the Frew-Frew items in later years.

Don't get me wrong...I can appreciate the newer models I just prefer the earlier examples..
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  #117  
Old 08-30-2011, 12:10 AM
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I always liked seeing the Shriners running around in the mini '65 Mustangs.



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  #118  
Old 08-30-2011, 05:31 PM
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I've been attempting to assemble the required measurements to fabricate a Cushman step-thru scooter frame and have finally acquired a lot of the measurements. These are for the basic frame structure and as soon as I can put together the neck & front footbox measurements as well as the neck angle I'll share them also. I just thought this should be available for those that would be interested.
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  #119  
Old 09-04-2011, 01:38 PM
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Default California Scooter Co....

these guys build a "Mustang" style postwar re-creation....
lots of good pics and some history of the original "Mustang" scoots as well as their current product...

http://californiascooterco.com/company/inspiration.html

a little bit of digging through their site reveals lots of info....
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  #120  
Old 09-04-2011, 02:19 PM
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Those are great looking copies of a Mustang.... Sure would make for an easy ride.. that's pretty much what the gentleman with the yellow & black scooters I posted above did on his own. I don't know the prices on those scoots,but he had over $2000 each in his homebuilt versions.

I just bought a Cushman Barrel Spring set of forks and they should get here in at least a couple of weeks time.

I got tired of expecting to find the measurements online and though there isn't a real immediate need for them... They were for sale at a price I could deal with and he'll ship them... Done Deal!

They should supply some needed measurements for the scooter frame as well as act as a pattern to replicate them. I intend to draw a set of plans for the various parts of them as well as attempt to copy them.

I may re-sell them and use the replica forks I fabricate for something I build. I'm glad I bought them since It's just one big question I can now answer myself.

I'd buy a frame too if I find one close enough to get without paying through the nose for shipping or driving to get it. An 800 mile round trip for a $100 scooter frame is sorta nuts ( I found 2,but both are about the same distance away).

With actual forks and the measurements I have already I should be able to fabricate a reasonable copy of a 1950's scooter. I've got half a dozen wheels/tires from a bomb carriage that should work as wheels even if I have to tweek the plans a bit. I need to examine them to see if they still have the hubs and if so what sort of axle might be acceptable. Might have to have an axle custom built,but that's cheaper than buying wheels/hubs/tires unless I find a deal.

Slowly but surely collecting information and parts and the weather is starting to cool off a bit (maybe!)
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