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Old 10-14-2018, 09:05 AM
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biker55 biker55 is offline
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Default storing pneumatic tools

Hello all, recently, while using my pneumatic nailer, kept having misfires. sometimes it would shoot the nail, other times nothing except hearing air leaking when depressing the trigger. normally, keep all my tools outside in my unheated garage. figure I probably need to change o rings. but would storing the tools in my garage have any effect on the o rings? how does everyone store their tools. Thanks
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Old 10-14-2018, 09:09 AM
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Shade Tree Welder Shade Tree Welder is offline
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Outside of my impacts, I don't use my P-tools regularly so before I put them
on the shelf I put a few drops of P-tool oil in the inlet, and just run them a
few seconds until the first sign of the oil making it out the exhaust. Then
wipe them down good and store them.

O-rings do wear with normal use, I had to replace the trigger valve on one
of my nailers at one point.
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Old 10-14-2018, 10:38 AM
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Old 10-14-2018, 10:21 PM
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A lot of the smaller import nailers are problematic. The plastic internals just fall apart over time. Probably adding the oil didn't help their longevity either. I've replaced a couple of pistons and valves to keep the guns going but at some point they just need to be tossed and replaced.

Hard to believe that a pneumatic tool is so poorly made that it almost ranks as a consumable
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Old 10-15-2018, 12:32 AM
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I do store mine in a shop that temps are uncontrollable so they are exposed to the seasonal temps.

I do as Ron had mentioned with the air tool oil run for a min but the only thing I do different is I have a quick coupler for each air tool that is plugged I put on after I use it or if its just being stored....

the Q' Coupler on the inlet was not so much to protect the internals from dry rot but from those dadgum little bees and wasp we get here that drag little spiders and fine grass stuff in to them and block them up I even have to connect the air hoses ends when not in use because of them....

but to get back on track with your question I have a few cheap import tools I do this with that may see use once a year or sometimes two among other air tools so far the practice of this has proven to be successful in the longevity of my air tools even the ones that don't see often use

I started this a few years back when I had bought a lot of IR and Mac air tools for paint and body work all brand new never opened still in sealed pack and box which were stored in an old ice chest on a shelf and just forgot about them due to surgeries I had and a rough recovery...

now they sat in there not exposed for the most part five years maybe six and when I did remember I had them and needed them every one of them with the exception of the DA were toast seals had dry rotted the DA soon took a dump after an hour..... so I think using the ATO and keeping the inlet capped you should be ok as long as you don't let it sit to the point of the oil becoming gummy internally but even then a 2 second shot of WD40 will usually clear that out...then use fresh ATO....
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Old 10-15-2018, 07:52 AM
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I use ATF for air tool oil. Anyone had any problems doing this? I figure ATF has lots of detergents that may help keep things clean.
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Old 10-15-2018, 08:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by biker55 View Post
Hello all, recently, while using my pneumatic nailer, kept having misfires. sometimes it would shoot the nail, other times nothing except hearing air leaking when depressing the trigger. normally, keep all my tools outside in my unheated garage. figure I probably need to change o rings. but would storing the tools in my garage have any effect on the o rings? how does everyone store their tools. Thanks
There's good advice here for long term storage, over a year.
But I think the point is that most tools fail because people plumb their shops with rubber hose. This is one of the best water collectors, and over time rust will destroy air tools stored with moisture in them. Running oil through them may not remove water sitting in a bearing race groove, or behind a vane.
Most you guys live in a tropical climate, even though you think not. Air hose running around the shop in my climate will not pass air in winter after a few uses due to frost build up.

I have the luxury of a heated shop now but it does not stay heated when I am not there, so all my hand tools are exposed to swing temps.
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Old 10-15-2018, 09:19 PM
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Default Air tool oil.

I use Marvel Mystery Airtool oil. I picked up a case of it at a going out of business sale of a small hardware store in 1986 or 87. I think I am on my third can out of the case.
When I pull a tool out of the cabinet, I douse it pretty heavy with the oil, depress the trigger and then let it set for about five minutes. Then I run it up to full speed to clean out the excess oil, usually with a rag over the exhaust to catch the excess oil. Then I use it. Once done I give it another dose of oil and put it away. Still have an impact I bought in 1984. It still works. It just does not have the power of my new one.
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Old 10-16-2018, 09:21 AM
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The past three nailers that I've killed off have been victims of corrosion in the head/piston area. Not sure if it's water or what, but when you pull it apart it looks calcified and the pieces just crumble. There's not really any metal to clean down to in any sort of attempt to get it working again. The newer ones are being made to be lightweight, so they're using alloys of magnesium everywhere they can make it work. I have to believe that there's also an element of dissimilar metal magic working against the guts of the tools, which proper oiling will never completely help.

It hasn't bothered me so much because two of them weren't mine in the first place. They both belonged to the range, which procured them from the associated pawn shop. No telling on their life story before they ended up being traded for $15 worth of drug money.
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Old 10-16-2018, 11:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dubby View Post
The past three nailers that I've killed off have been victims of corrosion in the head/piston area. Not sure if it's water or what, but when you pull it apart it looks calcified and the pieces just crumble. There's not really any metal to clean down to in any sort of attempt to get it working again. The newer ones are being made to be lightweight, so they're using alloys of magnesium everywhere they can make it work. I have to believe that there's also an element of dissimilar metal magic working against the guts of the tools, which proper oiling will never completely help.

It hasn't bothered me so much because two of them weren't mine in the first place. They both belonged to the range, which procured them from the associated pawn shop. No telling on their life story before they ended up being traded for $15 worth of drug money.
That is a common failure problem due to use with those little pancake and gas powered construction site compressors in which you never see a water collector or dryer of any kind attached to.
the corrosion you see is from water no ATO to allow water to sweat off of while in use and then stored for water/moisture allowed to sit in there and do its damage.... fairly common issue you will find in pawned air tools used mainly in the everyday contractors and construction site use.

They don't see it like we do the ppl. who work within the automotive an metal fabrication world as we see it as we must keep the tool clean and working because of the materials we expose them to and as where they see it... saw dust is messy but harmless and therefore neglect to consider the AT needs the same attention as their saw would as most contractors would not want their saw and other power tools getting wet or exposed to moisture..... but yet ignore the air tool and compressor.

I have bought a few small high end compressors over the years for literally for les than 30 bucks because they say it wont build pressure it just keeps running in order to use it has got heavy has lots of water coming out the hose....so that person just bought a new one just like it because it worked really good for a long time...

but never thought once to drain the water
and so for 30 bucks or less I get a 600 dollar compressor drain the water out of the tanks' and have good compressor again.
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