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  #11  
Old 07-28-2004, 04:53 AM
Wyoming
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Pat, Try either of the following two retailers:
Northern Tools at http://www.northerntool.com or Surplus Center at http://www.surpluscenter.com One or the other should be able to fill the bill. Also, dig out your local Yellow Pages and see what you have available for a hydraulic parts supply house in your area. It doesn't take much steel at all before the cheap prices of the catalog companies start getting mired down in freight bills. I'd also be surprised if the local boys couldn't answer most of your questions or steer you out of a dead end.
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  #12  
Old 07-28-2004, 07:17 AM
SheepDog SheepDog is offline
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If you really want to learn hydraulics (beyond this project) there's a series of books called "Industrial Fluid Power". It's a 3 volume set, but the first volume does a good job of explaining the basics. It's not a "dummies" book, so there's a lot to digest. I don't remember where I got my copy, but a google search should turn it up.
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  #13  
Old 07-28-2004, 11:19 AM
Franz Franz is offline
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Pat if you think of a restrictor valve as nothing more than an oversized needle valve that you can open slowly, it might be easier to understand.
What you want to acheive with respect to the DOWN side of the operation is maximum controlability of the load. By using a valve you can open in small increments, you gain control.
This one would work for your purpose http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...829194215&rd=1

Last edited by Franz; 07-28-2004 at 11:26 AM.
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  #14  
Old 07-28-2004, 12:38 PM
f350ca
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Pat,
I think what you need is a high pressure needle valve. Think of it as being the screw you use to lower a hydraulic jack. A restictor valve that you mentioned is used to set a maximum flow in a cuicut. For your aplication it probably wouldn't work as the load changes with the load your lifting. Back to the jack example, you crack the needle when your lowering a truck but open it to push it down by hand.
Noticed an extra fitting on the tank that looks like it has two o-rings on it, beside what looks like a breather. Any idea what that is?
Think the T and return to the tank should work, but as said the tank may not hold enough volume to fill the cylinder you use.
To hook it up electricly put power to the big post on the solenoid and the small post will activate it to run the motor. Same as a ford starter.
Be VERY careful using air to test a hydraulic curcuit. Cylinders have a high static friction, once you put enough air pressure on them to get them moving they tend to extend very quickly as the air expands.
Hope this is of some help.
Greg
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  #15  
Old 07-29-2004, 05:18 AM
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Pat Pat is offline
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Wyoming,

Thanks for the link to the Surplus Center. They have quite an assortment of items. I spotted a Parker Flow Control Valve (9-5300-38) for $23.95 that looks like it will work for what I need. They also have a Tee (9-1918) for $4.65 which I think would be a lot safer than a regular 3/8" Tee made for plumbing water.

Sheepdog,

Thanks for the info about the books. It is surely something I could use, and will look around to see what I can find.

Franz,

Thanks for the e-bay link

f350ca,

Thank you for the information. That "extra fitting" is actually the breather/fill hole, and the black cover with the screw in the center goes on top of the breather/fill hole. Sorry to confuse anyone, I should have replaced it, or removed it before I took the picture..............thanks again
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  #16  
Old 07-29-2004, 06:51 AM
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Pat

Order the catalog from Surplus Center and on page 18 you will see the three books "Industrial Fluid Power", $29.95 each.
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