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Old 09-07-2014, 11:52 AM
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Default How much generator needed?

I'm sure this has been discussed, but my search has been fruitless.

How large of a generator is needed to power my Lincoln 140 MIG?

I understand the Volts X Amps = Watts calculation but...I have a 5500 W genny and it wont run it. I've rented a larger genset, I think it was 6250? and it didn't run it either. I've also tried a HH140 with the same results.

I sent a question to Lincoln and their expert responded according to above calculation.

So...what am I missing?
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Old 09-07-2014, 12:40 PM
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I've run my HH135 on a 2500 watt generator. If it produces the same amps as the outlet on the wall it should do the job.
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Old 09-07-2014, 12:45 PM
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Based on a straight watts x volts calculation you should be able to get away with a smaller generator but it just doesn't work that way. from our experience, not some theoretical calculation, you're going to need about 10 KW to run your machine. You might get by with an 8 KW but remember that you need to supply full power to the welder plus some reserve...
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Old 09-07-2014, 01:10 PM
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If you are using an extension cord, the cord may be the problem.

Just remember gasoline and sparks don't mix.
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Old 09-07-2014, 01:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Graybeard62 View Post
I'm sure this has been discussed, but my search has been fruitless.

How large of a generator is needed to power my Lincoln 140 MIG?

I understand the Volts X Amps = Watts calculation but...I have a 5500 W genny and it wont run it. I've rented a larger genset, I think it was 6250? and it didn't run it either. I've also tried a HH140 with the same results.

I sent a question to Lincoln and their expert responded according to above calculation.

So...what am I missing?
What happens when you try to weld with it on genny power?

Generally generators are rated at max surge output like when starting electric
motors. The continuous output is what you need to look at for welder use.
However, a 5500W genny is usually a 4000-4500 watt continuous output and
you welder is 2400 watt consumption. So you should be good. Is the genny
grounded to earth? A stake in the ground and bonded to the genny chassis?

An extension cord would have to be long and thin to kill 2000 watts of extra
power?
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Old 09-07-2014, 01:39 PM
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My newest neighbor has been getting his feet wet with this situation.
He wanted to gear up to repair & replace some railings at an apartment building so he bought a little Harbor Freight 240 volt welder and a generator to run it.
It didn't work so he took the genny back & they replaced it.
Still didn't work. The drive rollers wouldn't even run.

So he finally asked me what I thought and I had him bring the welder over & we plugged it in to the same 240 volt outlet I use for my MM251.
It ran fine.
He brought the generator over. It was a 120 volt (only) generator.
He said he would take it back & swap "for a bigger one".

He has done this kind of work before but he was using customer-supplied equipment.
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Old 09-07-2014, 02:52 PM
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What happens when you try to weld with it on genny power?

Generally generators are rated at max surge output like when starting electric
motors. The continuous output is what you need to look at for welder use.
However, a 5500W genny is usually a 4000-4500 watt continuous output and
you welder is 2400 watt consumption. So you should be good. Is the genny
grounded to earth? A stake in the ground and bonded to the genny chassis?

An extension cord would have to be long and thin to kill 2000 watts of extra
power?

Not quite That 4000-4500 wats is at 240 volts that welder is running on 1/2 that (120 v) as it is only using one side of the generator. You have lots of motor but are a little light on the generator. It also depends on the generator /regulator design. Most little generators are single stage and do not have a lot of reserved magnetic storage so the voltage collapses faster under inrush conditions
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Old 09-07-2014, 04:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by terry lingle View Post
Not quite That 4000-4500 watts is at 240 volts that welder is running on 1/2
that (120 v) as it is only using one side of the generator. You have lots of
motor but are a little light on the generator. It also depends on the
generator /regulator design. Most little generators are single stage and do not
have a lot of reserved magnetic storage so the voltage collapses faster under
inrush conditions
You are assuming it is a 240V genny, It might only be a 120V genny.
There is a lot we do not know at this point.
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  #9  
Old 09-07-2014, 06:44 PM
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Okay, let's see if I can fill in some details.

Never tried in GMAW mode but in FCAW, spits, sputters, sticks, will not establish a bead, if at all, bead is classic chicken shit. Doesn't seem to matter the power setting. Have used different cord sets including a 10ga. and a 12ga.

Have never tried an earth ground on genset.

The genset has both 110v and 220v ports. It ran the a/c on my travel trailer, runs my service truck including 110v compresser, let's see, what else?
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  #10  
Old 09-07-2014, 09:57 PM
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No I assume very little. All the off the shelf home owner units over 1500 watts come with a 120/240 receptacle. If it is a better grade industrial machine it will run the welders mentioned.
The home owner inexpensive units are usually marginal for complex loads.
They are built for the lowest possible price with the maximum set of features
quality and performance reflect that fact.

Just last week I repaired a 2kw set for a pensioner (the only reason I will even look at them) That set had no voltage regulator but used a resonant winding and AC cap to set the voltage. The cap had failed. Fortunately it was a standard value so I could replace it.
It also has a plastic rear housing with a tiny needle roller bearing mounted in the plastic housing. How long do you think it will last once the lubrication hardens and that bearing starts heating up?
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