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Old 07-03-2004, 06:17 AM
Aaron
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Default Air Compressor Question:

Well, last night I bought a 60gal upright compressor.

My question concerns the manual statement that it should be mounted on vibration isolating mounts. How do you guys have your compressors mounted? I'm thinking they mean like a rubber spacer under the feet, but that doesn't seem very sturdy.
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Old 07-03-2004, 07:46 AM
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If you want it mounted perminent, use "wedge anchors. Cut washers out of rubber, or mud flaps, or an old tire.
Due to space constraints in the Magic Garage I have mine on casters.
Here's a picture of my "auto Drain", you can see the caster in the backround.
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Old 07-03-2004, 08:16 AM
Aaron
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I just want to stay upright, not fall on the wife/kids/car etc. How sturdy is your castor setup? Did you have to dtrp it to the wall or anything?

I figured on bolting it to the floor, but I wasn't sure about the rubber washers. Only thing I could think of was some 1" long x 1-1/4" diameter rubber cylinders we use for jounce bumpers at work. This would just be too long, though.
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Old 07-03-2004, 09:08 AM
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It won't fall over on its own. But it should have a wider base, its not real stable moving. I'm careful when I have to move it. It suits my requirements. I'd recommend bolting down. If I had more room, thats what I'd do. If you can get about 1/4" thick rubber, that would work just fine. Thats what I use for vibration dampening on sewer plant blowers.
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Old 07-03-2004, 09:49 AM
atucker atucker is offline
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Aaron,

I have a 60 gallon upright Ingersoll-Rand. I bought it at the local IR "Air Store", which had better prices than anyone else. I also bought the 4 vibration isolators and regulator from them. They are 4" X 4" X 1". They are a "sandwich" made from several different, very dense, pliable materials. About $5 each IIRC. I used some regular expansion type concrete achors I got at HD. The IR manual recommends lag shields and lag bolts. If this thing wants to fall over, I think a chunk of the concrete floor will come with it.

Run down to Harbor Freight and get one of the "auto-drain" kits that Fla Jim showed. The best $10 you'll spend in a while. Makes the periodic manual drainings almost a non-issue. I used to drain mine once every week or two and would get a small stream (maybe an ounce or two) running across the floor. After adding the auto-drain, I now get a drop or two. A very cleverly designed little device that should be bullet proof - machined brass and O-rings and that's it. Replace the plastic tubing that comes with it with .25" copper.

Allen T.
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Old 07-03-2004, 10:05 AM
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I just left mine on the pallet it came on when I got it its about a 3x3 pallet and trust me it isnt going anywhere unles I move it and even then its alot of work granted it is also tied into an 80 gallon tank giving me around 140 gallons of air capacity


Rick
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Old 07-03-2004, 10:31 AM
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I used a 3/4" thick piece of rubber, from the local rubber & hose supplier and bolted it down to the floor.

<img src="http://shopfloortalk.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=350">

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Old 07-03-2004, 11:32 AM
Aaron
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Thanks for all the information, guys!

I decided to slow down and look for the right materials, and do this once, rather than tearing it apart in a month to redo it. It will probably be a day or so before it's running, but at least I know it's done right, and won't need redone. No big hurry anyway, I guess, other than my impatience.

I think I'll bolt it down. I think I have a 3/8" thick sheet of neoprene in my office, so that will probably be cut into isolator washers. I am also trying to decide how many air drops I want to put in the garage and shop. Decisions.....
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Old 07-03-2004, 11:37 AM
Franz Franz is offline
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Mine sits on a pair of 4X8 wood blocks. The biggest problem I've seen with compressors in the last 20 years is vibration caused stress cracks where the legs are welded to the receiver, undoubtedly due to lighter gague receivers.
Since most machines are not properly shimmed to the floor they sit on, the vibration problem causes additional stress when they are then anchored to the floor.
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Old 07-03-2004, 02:34 PM
atucker atucker is offline
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I forget which welding board it took place on, but there was a very long thread on piping for air systems. PVC pipe was one of the big discussions. Maybe Franz can remember where it was.

Personally, I used 5/8" Type L copper with 4 drops. I used copper mainly because I had most of it and the fittings. I brazed most of the fittings and used flare fittings where I knew I might want to take something apart. There are several good articles on the net about air system piping, but I don't have the links anymore. As I remember, TP Tools has a lot of info on their site.

Before my dad passed away years ago, he did a lot of HVAC and concession plumbing for a theatre company. I ended up with all of his fittings, etc. Been using them up for over 20 years and still have more than a lifetime supply. Next question is, will my sons know what to do with what's left?

Franz makes a good point about shimming the feet. Having a typical concrete floor I ended up with quite a few shims under the isolators. Tried to make sure it was level and evenly distributed on each foot. The anchors should be equally torqued for obvious reasons. I made a coil out of 5/8" Type K to isolate the vibration from the lines. Everyone asks what the still is for .

Allen T.

Last edited by atucker; 07-03-2004 at 02:43 PM.
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