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  #21  
Old 02-13-2011, 06:26 PM
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Charlie C Charlie C is offline
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I purchased my loader in eastern Washington State a couple of years ago, where it gets pretty cold in the winter.
After I got the loader home I am looking as some cracked welds that the arms had in them, thinking how I wanted to reweld them. When I noticed that the arms that connect to the bucket looked like they were bulged out.

I thought that there might be water in the arm and at some time in its other life the water had frozen. I drilled a couple of 1/8" holes in the arms and drained out about a quart of water from each arm. There was no real way for the water to be in there but it was.
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  #22  
Old 02-13-2011, 10:05 PM
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Johnboy, Thats going to work. I done the same thing to my loader tractor. The only thing had was a manure bucket off a International Farmall M. It is a trip bucket. A guy at work gave it to me. I made it full hydraulic operational. The loader frame is a Wagner loader, the kind thats made of 3" pipe. I had the Case VAI and this loader and Dad told me to get out the welder and torches and make it fit. I did that.

I know it will work. You have the right conponents. Besides its better to have a too small a bucket than one thats too big. My manure bucket is only 4' wide. I have a normal bucket too. Its 6' wide. I think its too big and I don't use it that much. Its a homemade bucket and it came with the loader frame.

I like this project. It will be very useful. I think your doing right.

Kevin
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  #23  
Old 02-14-2011, 04:41 AM
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I know I can "make it fit" but I'm not sure how it stacks up in cost/benefit/time terms.

This bucket would most likely be free, but will be around 4-6 inches smaller in each dimension and take a share more work to fit.

The bigger bucket is obviously bigger, but also has been designed to fit from the outset, so I'll only have a to weld on two pieces of angle each side and it'll be done. it's not super expensive either, gonna be less than two hundred euro.

This is far less ambitious than your project so kevin, I'm only modifying things that already work together, to make them work differently is all, nothing too major.


It's a fun project, and I'm enjoying burning lots of rods in decent steel, no fear of blowing holes here, unlike some recent tinwork repairs.
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  #24  
Old 02-14-2011, 08:33 AM
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Johnboy, I don't mean for you to take loads of time doing this. I know when I'm doing these things I have more time than money. So if it takes a little longer to get to the use it point then I don't care. Just so long as I didn't have to spend alot of money on it. I'm just a cheapa$$ LOL. I'm the cheapest labor I have and scrap steel is my way out. If I have to buy something then I have to find a side job to do in order to finance the job I want to do. I'm like you, do it the most cost effective way with the least ammount of money involved.

Your loader is way less junky than the loader I installed. LOL I'm telling you you will be very glad with the operation of the loader when you get it together and use it. No matter how long it took to build/modify/install it. I know I was when I got mine together. My tractor needs worked on now. LOL

Kevin
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  #25  
Old 02-14-2011, 08:54 AM
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I suppose I try and strike a happy medium, I look at what it'll cost for me to do it, versus what it'll cost to get it done, versus how much time it'll take.

My dad reckons I spend money like there's no tomorrow, and my friends reckon I'm a tightass.

So I think I'm hitting a pretty good balance.

for what I'd be getting 200 euro is a very good price, and I'd have a better job at the end of it, and it'd take me less time to do it, and the 200 would be tax deductible.

So all in I'm erring towards getting the bucket made, but I'll have to get a better look at the one my dad has before I decide.
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  #26  
Old 02-14-2011, 10:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnBoy View Post

for what I'd be getting 200 euro is a very good price, and I'd have a better job at the end of it, and it'd take me less time to do it, and the 200 would be tax deductible.
John,screwing the gubbermint out of taxes would tip me in that direction,especially with the added benefits of quicker, and better in the end.
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  #27  
Old 02-19-2011, 03:46 PM
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I've hit a snag.

I want to take off the tipping rams and linkages. lots of reasons. I need to make this thing lighter for puny me to handle it. I need to clean and paint it, oh and the tipping rams need new chrome rods.

The problem is I cant get the pins out!

They're a style of pin commonly used on loaders and the like, with a flange on the end and a bolt securing that. Like in the second pic.

unfortunately I cant get at the back of the pins to drive them out. I dont have much in the way of heat, just a propane blowtorch. I've given a few soakings in wd40, and have tried applying various hammer/chisel combos to no avail.

So people, I'm open to suggestions. I figure I've two options.

1) drill through the box section of the loader from the far side allowing me to put a punch in and try and drive them backwards.

2) drill into the exposed end of the pin, tap the hole and put a bolt in, then try and fashion some sort of puller. not sure I can go much bigger than M10 without wrecking the pins (only 3/4 inch) and I'm not sure how much pull I can get on an M10
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  #28  
Old 02-19-2011, 06:35 PM
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JohnBoy

I would try the drill and tap the pin to pull them out. Will the pins turn when you remove the bolts that hold them in place? Drill and tap, then be gentle and persistent with a slide hammer. Or another idea, weld a nut on the end of the pin ans screw the slide hammer on to that or some other puller. In situations like this I like the slide hammer arrangement. The pins may be deformed due to wear and if you turn them they may line everything up and slide right out.

Wd ain't much for penetrating oil. Mix up some of the oil Jack has recommended. 50/50 Automatic transmission fluid and acetone. That stuff works good.

JohnBoy I was looking a Charlie's steam engine thread and he shows a picture of pulling a pin that He drilled and tapped. Have a look. It is from Today.

Scott

Last edited by Scotts; 02-19-2011 at 09:34 PM.
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  #29  
Old 02-19-2011, 10:10 PM
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I'd weld a nut on the end of the pin also. Might take more than one attempt but if you pull the threads out of the nut its easy to grind it off and weld another one one. Then either use a slide hammer or some sort of bridge and all thread to pull with.
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  #30  
Old 02-19-2011, 11:29 PM
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I am betting they are wore and stuck. The SFT rust knocker does work. Weld the nut screw a bolt in it then try to tap before slide hammering from the side you can get to.Otherwise sawsall disassemble and then knock out.Betting new pins will be required any way.
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