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  #21  
Old 05-07-2018, 02:17 PM
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digger doug digger doug is offline
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Don't forget the "Swedish Milling Machine" as well.....
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  #22  
Old 05-08-2018, 08:35 AM
Farmersamm Farmersamm is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LW Hiway View Post
Chris, timely thread.

I have yet to decide on which combination of materials to be used at the pivot points on my two little loader builds. But I'll have to do so rather soon as it's time to get them installed and working.

My thoughts are steady with the assumption that the non-metal materials used for such things might be the way to go and have in hand a few of them sized for what I think I need. Just have not pulled the trigger on the welding and installs as yet. Time to get off the pot.

Thanks for the postings
Noted and recorded for future reference.
I'd tend to shy away from any non metallic bushings. There's a lot of stress on those pivots.

Even though you may build it perfectly square, and true........a loader will flex pretty good when it's actually at work. Lifting stresses, and movement in relation to the tractor traveling over the ground. Steel pins/bushings will last a lifetime if kept greased.

Soft material will tend to "flow" under pressure, and loaders see a lot of impact loading on the joints.

Also....if you sit and think about it.........just what is the cycle rate on a loader? Not very high. I move approximately 300 round bales per year. Once from the field, or hay meadow........and again when feeding. That's approximately 600 load cycles. I used to move maybe 3x that when I sold hay, but that was years ago, which BTW was with the same loader. My pins are still in good condition after all these years.
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  #23  
Old 05-08-2018, 08:43 AM
Farmersamm Farmersamm is offline
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One more point..........Steel pins/bushings are more tolerant of lower tolerances. You can run a .010 slip fit with no problem. I don't believe you can do that with a soft bushing, it would probably tear itself to bits in short order.

There's two schools of thought on bushing fits. Both mine

A tight bushing will keep dirt out better, but it's also prone to clogging up when grease hardens when the machine is unused for long periods, and the grease decays. Then you play Hell getting grease into it again without almost having to disassemble the thing.

A loose ten thou bushing will allow more dirt in, which can in itself clog the works up, but is easily remedied by keeping greased, and pushing the dirt out. Also.......the machine is easier to assemble when building it. It's a bitch assembling large stuff that is built to close tolerances. Wind up beating on stuff to get it together. That extra few thou worth of slop goes a long way to make your life easier. Especially, if like me, you're a one man operation.
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  #24  
Old 05-08-2018, 01:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Farmersamm View Post
...Steel pins/bushings will last a lifetime if kept greased.... ...My pins are still in good condition after all these years.
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Originally Posted by Farmersamm View Post
...A loose ten thou bushing will allow more dirt in, which can in itself clog the works up, but is easily remedied by keeping greased, and pushing the dirt out....
Yup, in my many years of experience working with and repairing machinery, especially FARM machinery, the no. 1 cause of most problems is lack of grease or lubrication. I can almost guarantee that more damage has been caused and more repairs have been needed due to lack of grease than because someone used the wrong material for pins and bushings. Doesn't mean you shouldn't make an effort to use the best materials you can but regular and generous application of grease will overcome a multitude of other issues...
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  #25  
Old 05-08-2018, 06:15 PM
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Originally Posted by LKeithR View Post
Yup, in my many years of experience working with and repairing machinery, especially FARM machinery, the no. 1 cause of most problems is lack of grease or lubrication. I can almost guarantee that more damage has been caused and more repairs have been needed due to lack of grease than because someone used the wrong material for pins and bushings. Doesn't mean you shouldn't make an effort to use the best materials you can but regular and generous application of grease will overcome a multitude of other issues...
How very true that is.
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