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Old 09-03-2011, 05:14 AM
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matthew_g matthew_g is offline
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Default What type??

I have a question for the gurus...
What type of tool steel if it is tool steel are punch and dies made from??
A year or 2 ago I bought a pallet load of stuff just to get 1 item at an auction, And part of the load was heaps of dies and punches..
My reason for asking is....If it is tool steel then surely I could use it to make cutters and stuff out of by first annealing then re hardening
YES? NO?
Matt
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Old 09-03-2011, 06:11 AM
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Probably NO. I really don't know enough about it to be sure, but I would think that if it made sense to anneal and re-harden, shops would do it all the time. They don't.

Stamping dies tend to be made out of (what we refer to here as) D-2. The punches can also be made from that, but they're just as often made from S-7 shock steel. Neither seems to make ideal cutting tools.
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Old 09-03-2011, 07:14 AM
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If D2, here's some info: http://www.heattreatonline.com/D2ToolSteelArticle.pdf

If S7, "S7 is a shock-resistant air hardening tool steel, designed for high impact resistance at relatively high hardness. It offers toughness to withstand chipping and breaking, combined with high attainable hardness and good wear resistance. " It's goor for chisels and punches.
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Old 09-03-2011, 07:16 AM
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All of my punches were made from S-7 and do well. I am the 2nd owner of them.
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Old 09-06-2011, 12:30 AM
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most cutters are made from m-42 if i remember correct and go up to about 60-64rc..
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Old 09-07-2011, 11:43 AM
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The trim steels at the forge/machine medical implant shop that i worked at were comprised of S-7, for both the punches and the dies. The forging dies were something entirely different to take the heat. H-13 rings a bell but I can't remember for sure.

Jeff
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Old 09-11-2011, 10:10 PM
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Post a picture of them and also look for a makers name marked on them.
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Old 09-17-2011, 09:21 PM
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You will never know exactly what the steel is unless you can ID the maker.(unless you want to send a sample off for analysis) You can heat a piece in a forge or with a torch to non magnetic and let it cool slowly in ashes or vermiculite. If its an oil or water hardening tool steel it will be soft enough to file easily. If its an air hardening steel it will not be fileable. If it is fileable repeat the heat to non magnetic and quench in oil. If it is as hard as a goats head you are in business. You will have to experiment with temper temperatures to get the rockwell hardness you desire.
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