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  #21  
Old 01-31-2019, 09:44 PM
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arizonian arizonian is offline
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Originally Posted by allessence View Post
Ok, so here we go..

There is a huge difference between Mechnical, air, steam hammers..

Hydrualic will be adressed shortly..

Mechanical will need to be setup for the size of material being worked.. A mechanical hammer can be ran with a deft touch but ideally it's a work horse and crude by many standards.. How good you are at adjusting the machine and the treadle will dictate just how good you are with the machine itself..

I own a 200lb hammer and it is not for a beginner..

For most a 25lbs or a 50lbs is great in a mechanical hammer.. Matt is correct you have the up an down so on the down it has a throw just like a hand hammer but amplified some so it will have snap.. Again if adjusted properly..

An air hammer can offer many advantages over mechanical including The Spencer hammer but you need a compressor large enough to run it..

an Air hammer can have really good control but it will also need some adjustments and the newer models will operate a lot like a steam hammer..

A steam hammer can be used as a vise, single blow, 2 blow, 3 blow, continuous run or anywhere in between and is the Cadillac of hammers..

Problem is you need a steam power plant to run them.. I almost bought a 1500lbs one.. Until what I found out was needed for air to run it 750cuft per minute... Or a 13 hp steam engine.. LOL.. Steam is crazy efficient..

If you are looking to build the and own a compressor I'd go with air..

If no air a Spencer hammer..
Jen,

Thanks for the education. I'll probably never own any of these hammers, but the part about a steam hammer being used as a vise raises a question. Assuming the hammer is run on steam, does the "vise" force bleed off as the steam condenses?

Looking forward to your expertise on hydraulic hammers.
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  #22  
Old 02-03-2019, 11:58 AM
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I also thought as steam condensed you would loose grip in your vise force.
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  #23  
Old 02-03-2019, 03:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arizonian View Post
...Assuming the hammer is run on steam, does the "vise" force bleed off as the steam condenses?
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldRedFord View Post
I also thought as steam condensed you would loose grip in your vise force.
With a steam hammer there should be a constant force on the piston at all times, at least that's the way I understand them to work. As long as you've got steam from the boiler you should be able to regulate the force...
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  #24  
Old 02-05-2019, 08:16 PM
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Yep, I've built the Clay Spencer tire hammer. Actually built 14 of them at one time. They are 50 lb hammers and are very capable and very controllable. You could build one pretty cheaply if you took time and scrounged the yards. A 200 lb hammer is an industrial machine. It's way overkill for home use.
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  #25  
Old 02-12-2019, 07:15 PM
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Ok.. A steam hammer because the cylinder is hot does not condense the water quick enough to cause a problem..

Steam also has a really neat feature of expansion that once it works (moves one piston).. It can drive another piston of a larger size because it expands creating more energy..

I had seen a newer steam motor that had 4 expansion pistons on the main engine.. Really neat..

So as the hammer is lowered it gets to a point that the return stroke is not triggered so can clamp.. I don't have any idea what the pressure is exerted but I had seen a video that the chuck of steel was a few tons and it held the whole long 13ft long piece just by the end as the manipulator changed position..

Steam hammers are the most controllable hammer out of the hammer vintage designed.. The pneumatic/hydraulic offer more control and is what happened when big business moved over to a more efficient and accurate hammer..

These hammers were huge and they use huge accumulators with hydraulic fluid that actually strike like a steam hammer but without anything but the hydraulics.. Some really crazy stuff..

Steam hammers to me were the ultimate design and the most usable...

There is a guy from Kens iron who makes and air hammer that has the same functions as a steam hammer.. Really pretty neat.. Got to try it at the ABana conference..
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  #26  
Old 02-12-2019, 07:19 PM
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The Newer model of Clay Spencer is really a neat design.. It has a throttle with a tire stop so you can control the hammer with stopping it at the top..


Mechnical hammers or older hammers most do not have a brakes built in..

Fairbanks was the first to implement a brake system and Dupont bought Fairbanks in a later take over..

The 200lbs hammer I have has the brake built into it..
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  #27  
Old 02-14-2019, 10:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tnmike View Post
Yep, I've built the Clay Spencer tire hammer. Actually built 14 of them at one time. They are 50 lb hammers and are very capable and very controllable. You could build one pretty cheaply if you took time and scrounged the yards. A 200 lb hammer is an industrial machine. It's way overkill for home use.
Got any pictures of your hammer?
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