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Old 03-30-2011, 12:38 AM
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Default My large and heavy table out of 25mm plate

Well I got my 3mt x 1.2mt x 25mm plate for free from a friends neighbour so here is how I built my new welding table and moved it, it was badly bent in a couple of corners so they had to be straightened first

Pic 1.
Grooves cut about 8-10mm deep into the plate and 4-6mm wide, to be filled with a very hot weld to try to pull up the plate into being straight as the weld pool cooled, all 4 corners had bends in them, 25mm, 8mm, 10mm and 2mm out of flat, although it might not look it, that corner in this pic was bent about 25mm out, the straight edge was resting on a power cord at the other end but I didn’t notice it till after I finished taking the pics, trickiest part was working out where to put those grooves and I think I got lucky as it didn’t come out too bad.

Pic 2.
The grooves are welded and plate straightened as best I could and a piece of 200mm x 75mm channel welded to the top center. This was welded to provide a support for the 2 long T pieces of steel made from cutting a universal beam (30cm x 16.5cm) in half. This gave me a vertical wall of 165mm x 12mm thick plate.

As I cut the Universal I beam the internal stresses from when the I beam was formed, released and the 2 halves curved slightly outward. So I welded the two halves to the channel and the plate, and then used strong clamps to force the ends in till they mated with the smaller I beams on the ends, also clamped the ends down to the plate as well. Some of my welds weren’t the best as the plate was very badly pitted and the pits full of crap, I didn’t want to spend a week grinding it all out, so just ground out what I could within reason and then blasted out the crap with the arc.

Pic 3.
The I beam cut in half and two smaller pieces slotted to fit together to try out before fitting and welding to the plate.
Pic 4.

The frame support T beam and I beam welded together.

Pic 5.
Support frame fully welded
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Old 03-30-2011, 12:40 AM
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Pic 6 & 7
A couple of welds holding the top plate to the support frame

Pic 8.
200mm x 75mm Channel welded to the frame for legs, (10mm flats were welded to the bottoms and a couple of 75mm SHS spreaders between the table legs which aren’t shown here)

Pic 9, 10, 11.
Winched up the table on to the trailer using a 2000Kg winch and short lengths of 32mm pipe underneath it to make it easier to get on and off the trailer. Positioned it near where I wanted it to be near the garage allowing for the flip over distance.

And this is where the stress starts. Using large leverage bars to raise the top up slightly whilst pushing steel and timber supports between the edge of the ground and the plate. Raising the table slightly each time until it was high enough to use a 1200kg trolley jack. Clamped a piece of heavy angle to the top edge of the plate with two clamps. Put the jack under the raised angle edge and jacked it up bit by bit. When it got about 300mm of the ground I used a 2mt long piece of 100mm x 50mm RHS wedged in to the base of the top plate and the ground, tied that at the top and then to my clumping bamboo with 12mm rope and tensioned it. Also used a steel stand against that RHS but as the angle increased it became less usefull. Then used different lengths of pipe between the trolley jack and the clamped angle steel to get the increasing height till I finally flipped it over.

This was in case the table slipped off the jack, the idea being, it might give me a slight degree of safety, and should make the table slide forward away from me. Well at least that was the theory. Tensioning the rope each time I raised it up a little. Getting the table up from upside down flat to on its side was the hardest and the riskiest, from on its side up to completely right way up was relatively easy.
Once it was right side up it as just a matter of putting a couple of pieces of steel underneath it and levering or jacking up the ends, putting a set of skates under the legs and then using those large levers of mine to lever it into the garage. Had to put steel under the skates as my driveway is gravel.
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Making metal scream because I can

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Miller Auto Invision 456 + S-62 Wirefeeder
G6240B1 Gap bed lathe
16 speed pedestal drill
16Ft3 air compressor
Hafco BS-912 Bandsaw
Everlast Powerpro 256

Recipient of the Finger Award™... twice

Last edited by Ed.; 03-30-2011 at 12:59 AM.
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Old 03-30-2011, 12:41 AM
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So all up, it took about 8 hours spread over 2 days to move it into position from under the carport and into the garage, and 5 days to recover from all the effort. Probably didn’t help due to the fact that I had a kidney stone removed in hospital 2 days earlier.
Anyway it’s in now. Just have to add a few more things to finish it off, build a shelf underneath it for tools and so forth and also put up some support plates to attach my large vice to it. All up I estimate that it weighs about 1000Kg now.

The top surface is also pretty badly pitted, so I might fit a 4 or 6mm plate as a skin to it, and I managed to get 2 corners flat and the other two corners within 1-2mm. But I am also contemplating building a machine to face mill the entire top to make it completely level, smooth and flat.

As I have always wanted something like that and this gives me a reason to do so. But unfortunately it will take a long time for me to work out how to do it and also squeeze that in with all the other things I have/want to do. But at least I have just bought the motor for it which should arrive next week, a nice 3 phase 4HP 2800RPM unit. Thinking of using a 3” face mill as the cutter. Just have to spend a lot of time working out all the details on how it will go together, what features I would, like such as angle milling etc., and work out everything in my head what I need to make it all happen before I start it.
Ah!! Too many projects and not enough hours in the day to do them all, I still haven’t finished off my other welding table I started before Christmas.
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Making metal scream because I can

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Miller Auto Invision 456 + S-62 Wirefeeder
G6240B1 Gap bed lathe
16 speed pedestal drill
16Ft3 air compressor
Hafco BS-912 Bandsaw
Everlast Powerpro 256

Recipient of the Finger Award™... twice

Last edited by Ed.; 03-30-2011 at 12:46 AM.
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Old 03-30-2011, 02:34 AM
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Very nice, what do you estimate it weighs?
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Old 03-30-2011, 03:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tnmike View Post
Very nice, what do you estimate it weighs?
Thanks, approx. 1000kg, the top I think weighs about 720Kg and the frame and legs probably add another 280Kg or so.
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Making metal scream because I can

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Miller Auto Invision 456 + S-62 Wirefeeder
G6240B1 Gap bed lathe
16 speed pedestal drill
16Ft3 air compressor
Hafco BS-912 Bandsaw
Everlast Powerpro 256

Recipient of the Finger Award™... twice

Last edited by Ed.; 03-30-2011 at 03:39 AM.
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  #6  
Old 03-30-2011, 04:08 AM
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agreed, very very very nice.

how did you drag it into the shop once you had it on all fours?
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Old 03-30-2011, 07:26 AM
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A "wonton" table.
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Old 03-30-2011, 07:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnBoy View Post
agreed, very very very nice.

how did you drag it into the shop once you had it on all fours?
It wasn't dragged, no way is this sucker moving without a lot of force behind it, so I used leverage, once it was right side up, it was just a matter of using a couple of pieces of steel with skates on top and levering or jacking up the ends, putting a set of skates under the legs and then using those large levers of mine to lever it into the garage 6" at a time. Had to put steel under the skates as my driveway is gravel. Once on the concrete the skates worked much easier.
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Making metal scream because I can

-----------------------------------------
Miller Auto Invision 456 + S-62 Wirefeeder
G6240B1 Gap bed lathe
16 speed pedestal drill
16Ft3 air compressor
Hafco BS-912 Bandsaw
Everlast Powerpro 256

Recipient of the Finger Award™... twice
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  #9  
Old 03-30-2011, 08:03 AM
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"Some of my welds weren’t the best as the plate was very badly pitted and the pits full of crap, I didn’t want to spend a week grinding it all out, so just ground out what I could within reason and then blasted out the crap with the arc."


The welds you showed are beautiful. What are you going to use the table for? Milling the top because it's 1-2 mm out sounds like overkill to me. It's a beautiful work table as is. You're obviously a perfectionist,and that's not a bad thing. It's how you get what you want. Great job!
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Old 03-30-2011, 08:16 AM
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Fine Job! Looks to me like you've got that mig tuned in nice. Good looking welds.

I worked at a small factory here for a while. And the owner had purchased a bunch of tables at an auction in Michigan. Inch thick tops(some 1 1/2). Turns out these tables were used in Tank manufacturing. They came from Detroit Arsenal-Tank Plant, in warren Michigan. One had a huge hole in the center that they had patched. Was used for fitting out turrets.

Everyone loved those damn tables. Weld crap too them, beat the hell out of it, grind it off like nothing had ever happened.

Thanks for all the pics, great thread.
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