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Old 12-05-2012, 10:57 PM
mking7 mking7 is offline
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Default Mitering round tube

Is there a good trick when mitering round tube on both ends to make sure the cuts are 'clocked' together?

Basically cutting 45's on both ends the another piece mitered to be the upright. Does that make sense?
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Old 12-06-2012, 06:13 AM
monkers monkers is offline
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Im not sure I understand 100%, but you want to keep the parts in "alignment" for mitering so they line up properly for assembly? Like if you had a 45 on the bottom and 45 on the top? How about drawing a centerline before mitering on the tubes with a sharpie or something? Or, put a piece of blue painters tape at each end and mark the centerline on that if the tube is long.
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Old 12-06-2012, 07:06 AM
bjmh46 bjmh46 is offline
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I have often needed to do this. I've had to align angle cuts "in-line" and at various angles. Made this device some years ago for a project, and it served me well!



Hope the pic shows up!

Bob
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Old 12-06-2012, 07:44 AM
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Boogity Boogity is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mking7 View Post
Does that make sense?
No. It doesn't make sense at all. Please slow down and explain what you want to tell us. Thanks.
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Old 12-06-2012, 09:48 AM
mking7 mking7 is offline
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So basically I have some 2" pipe and want to make some simple wood racks. I could just lay two pieces of pipe down and saddle cut the uprights and cross pieces.

I would prefer to miter cut and weld the uprights. So for each runner I'd need to miter at 45 degrees on each end. The question was looking for tricks to make sure the 45's were cut on each end such that the uprights would/could be plumb and parallel when I put it together. I'm using a dry cut milwuakee saw.

I normally work with square tubing which makes it easy to keep the miters aligned. With round tube I got to thinking I'd need a way to ensure they are aligned otherwise one of my uprights might 'lean' one way of the other.
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Old 12-06-2012, 09:52 AM
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randydupree randydupree is offline
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use the seam on the tube for a reference.
Keep the seam up,or to the side so you can see it.
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Old 12-06-2012, 11:07 AM
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dubby dubby is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by randydupree View Post
use the seam on the tube for a reference.
Keep the seam up,or to the side so you can see it.
I was pretty sure this was the original intent of the post, and was going to suggest exactly what Randy just did. But, I'll take it one step further instead. I put the seam to the side facing the clamp on the saw and then use a soapstone to mark the seam's location. It works pretty good as a reference for the most part, but if you don't have the seam exactly centered when you make your mark things can get off. You can tweak it a little when you go to weld everything back up.
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Old 12-06-2012, 11:56 AM
shopsmith shopsmith is offline
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I just did the sharpie method. I layed the whole 10 foot of pipe on the floor and placed a long piece of 3/4 plywood right up to it and then used the ply as a straightedge for drawing a line all the way down the pipe. Then took a piece of painters tape and marked a line on it taped to the fence of the cut off saw. Match up the lines. Cut the first 45 then down the line to the second. 'twas perfect.
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Old 12-06-2012, 01:38 PM
o7oBaseMetal o7oBaseMetal is offline
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I use a level- you need one that is true for this (reads the same any side you use). Cut your first 45. Flip the pipe and situate it as close as the calibrated eyeball will get you. Check the level of the blade. Match your mitred end to the same level as the blade by spinning the pipe until the level reads the same with the clamp tight. Chop away. I was assuming you are using an abrasive chop saw. A band saw (provided it chops at a true 90° I match the mitred end to the level of the part of the vise you rest the pipe into.
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Old 12-06-2012, 03:16 PM
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Vernon Vernon is offline
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Tack a pcs of channel to the pipe that will give you a base Click image for larger version

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