Shop Floor Talk  

Go Back   Shop Floor Talk > Welding and Metalworking Forums > Machining

SFT Search:   
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #71  
Old 04-26-2022, 09:10 PM
Scotts's Avatar
Scotts Scotts is offline
Stuff, Just stuff
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Wichita Kansas
Posts: 5,513
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnBoy View Post
My Big question now is what order do I do things.


I have to assume the head is not aligned to the bed as it has been removed and is adjustable, there's basically opposing bolts horizontally under the head that allow it to be adjusted relative to the ways. No idea how I do that

The bed needs to be levelled, or at least aligned/untwisted which as I understand I need to do by turning a dumbell and measuring, which means investing in a micrometer.

I need to look at spindle bearing play.

I need to tweak the gibs on the carriage, cross slide and top slide. there's wayy too much movement able to happen there when it starts chattering (the pic attached is the good finish) also when facing the end of that bar which was not straight the carriage was getting pushed around way too easy I thought.


I'm thinking tighten the gibs, look at the spindle bearing adjustment and tool height and try again before I worry about alignment?

If I understand right alignment only really effects accuracy as opposed to finsh/basic metal removal.
Do you have a dial indicator? This will help getting the basic alignment. chuck a longer drill blank or transfer punch and put the indicator on the carage and start close to the chuck on the rod and move toward the end away from the chuck and this will tell you which way to go.

Just have fun and don't track any metal chips in the house.

Scott
Reply With Quote
  #72  
Old 04-26-2022, 11:05 PM
toprecycler's Avatar
toprecycler toprecycler is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Petoskey, Michigan
Posts: 6,193
Default Ehrlich/IXL Lathe

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnBoy View Post
Making chips!!!



I have zero clue what I'm at but I needed to run it for a bit so things I'm reading/watching have some context.



Awful amount of chatter so I need to figure all that out, but it's been taken apart and put back together with zero setup by someone with zero knowledge so it's a miracle it cut at all.



Tool at a random angle, below centre height, absolutely everything is wrong.



But I made chips!!


Let the fun learning begin!



You will get all kinds of advice now. Some will be directly applicable to you, and some will not apply to you at all with your "Small" lathe set up. This will be up to you to learn which applies and which does not, also will depend on your tools that you have available to use.



You may find that using carbide inserts, you may have trouble getting a good finish on your lathe. I relate this back to what I learned in High School Shop class, and have been enforced along the way by other machinests both online and in person. This relates to the rigidity of you actual lathe. Carbide cuts by "shearing" the material away. It is often said that small bench top lathes can not handle the pressure, or lack the horsepower to properly cause the shearing action, and will cause chatter marks/ bad finish.



HSS cutters are ground so that they "cut" the material away. These are usually better suited for small bench top lathes. But, HSS comes with the added learning curve of grinding your own tools bits,



I work in a shop daily using a Lathe and mill, building Hydraulic cylinder parts. My daily lathe is a big 20"x 72" between centers Summit lathe. What I can do on that lathe is considerable different on what I can do on my Home South Bend 11" lathe. I've been frustrated enough, I just picked up a bigger lathe for my home shop, same comparable size as my work lathe, also weighing in at 6,500 pounds, so I should be able to turn whatever my heart desires in the future, as soon as I figure out my power converter delima.



Anyways, back to your lathe and test cuts.

The finish looks rough. How heavy of a cut was you taking? With using a carbide tool, you will probably be need to take very light cuts, like under .020" or .5mm. Experiment with this. I would second Rons advice of setting the tool bit just a bit higher than CL of the work. It will pull itself down while in the cut. And be careful when learning. It will take a learning curve to hit your measurements. When you take a heavier cut, say .050" on the dial, you may actually cut .055" off your work piece, and when you dial in a .010" cut, you will only take off .008" off your work piece. It can get frustrating for sure.



A micrometer, or dial (I prefer Digital) caliper will for sure be on the list of items to get. There are lots of pros and cons to each. A Micrometer will usually give the most precise repeatable measurements, but the main downside is they usually only come in 1" increments. So you will need several to cover your work. You might want to start with a 0-1", and a 1-2". maybe watch ebay/ or your other preferred source of used tools.



A 6" digital caliper is my main measuring tool in my job. It does the measuring I need and the tolerances are fine for 90% of what I do. I prefer digital because I can switch between Metric and Imperial easily, and you can reset or zero them out where ever you want. Sometimes it is easier to zero it at the size you want, and then you can know exactly how much you have to go to get to you final measurement. But the best tip for Calipers, are to verify the zero when close each time you pick them up. I like the calipers that turn themselves off automatically, but will turn themselves back on when you move the sliding jaw.



But there are times that the micrometers come out. It will come down to how precise you want to be, and how precise you need to be. They can be had really cheap, and really expensive. You will get what you pay for here. I would shy away from the cheapest available under ($10), but you probably do not need the $200 ones either. (using US money as a I value it) but a couple grades up from the bottom, should suit you just fine, especially as you are learning. You can always upgrade later if you feel you want better quality and find that you really like machining. If you buy the top end now, and then decide you dont want it, and then try to sell it, you might have a hard time getting your money back for you investment because it is used.



One thing to remember on the Calipers, is if you do not get consistent readings, you might need to tighten the gib screws. The sliding jaw needs to slide easily, but should not have any "play" or rock. This is where the higher end calipers do better. They have better tolerances on the sliding finish, so they work better. My Mitutoyos are considerably better than my Harbor Freight cheapos, but they both have their place in my tool box. Depends on the job at hand.



I would also invest in a Magnet mount dial indicator. It comes in really handy to dial in the work piece. But you can do it also with the tool bit in your lathe. Just turn the chuck by hand as you bring the tool bit close, and tap on the part with a dead blow hammer, to get it to turn straight. One tip that an old machinist gave me, is that hitting the part as you are tightening the chuck with a small hammer, will help "set" the part straight in the chuck as it is tightened. This also works with drill bits in a drill chuck.



There are several you tube videos that should help you align your lathe. I remember one that was called "Rollie's Dad's Method" Looks like there are several videos out there now. Take your pick, I would recommend watching several videos, and then attempt it on your lathe.



I got long winded here, hopefully some of it makes sense to you.



Bottom line, enjoy your new lathe, and all the new found learning it will lead you to!

Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1933.jpg
Views:	18
Size:	173.2 KB
ID:	164470
__________________
Brian

You don't know what you don't know.

"It's what you learn after you know it all that counts." John Wooden
Reply With Quote
  #73  
Old 04-27-2022, 02:42 AM
GWIZ's Avatar
GWIZ GWIZ is offline
SFT Historian
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 7,418
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnBoy View Post
My Big question now is what order do I do things.

I'm thinking tighten the gibs, look at the spindle bearing adjustment and tool height and try again before I worry about alignment?

If I understand right alignment only really effects accuracy as opposed to finsh/basic metal removal.
Yes and Yes.

If the tool is below center line the part will try to roll over the top of the tool making/pulling the cross-slide backlash in the opposite direction, immediately making a deeper cut and the likely hood of breaking the tool.
__________________
*
*
The factory of the future will have only two employees, a man and a dog. The man will be there to feed the dog. The dog will be there to keep the man from touching the equipment. ~Warren G. Bennis
Reply With Quote
  #74  
Old 04-27-2022, 09:09 PM
Ironman's Avatar
Ironman Ironman is offline
Iron Modification Investigator
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Warburg, Alberta, Canada
Posts: 16,511
Default

John, probably a read of the South Bend How to run a lathe would be a good first move.
__________________
Gerry
You got freedom of speech, if you don't say too much.
Aaron Neville.

When a liberal screams racism, you can bet they were also born with white skin.
“The word ‘racism’ is like ketchup. It can be put on practically anything — and demanding evidence makes you a ‘racist’.”
Thomas Sowell
Reply With Quote
  #75  
Old 04-27-2022, 09:44 PM
digr's Avatar
digr digr is offline
The Real Deal
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Duluth MN
Posts: 9,009
Default

Here s the book
Attached Files
File Type: pdf 3789.pdf (3.74 MB, 20 views)
__________________
Drawing by Smartdraw
Reply With Quote
  #76  
Old 04-28-2022, 01:55 AM
JohnBoy's Avatar
JohnBoy JohnBoy is offline
Director of Languages
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Southern Ireland
Posts: 3,127
Default

I have the book, but it was kinda going in one ear and out the other. I needed to run it for a few minutes to get some context for all I'm reading and watching to relate to. Up to now it's all been theoretical
Reply With Quote
  #77  
Old 04-28-2022, 07:09 AM
digr's Avatar
digr digr is offline
The Real Deal
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Duluth MN
Posts: 9,009
Default

Something like this would work for your took holder
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	tool holder.jpg
Views:	28
Size:	109.1 KB
ID:	164491  
__________________
Drawing by Smartdraw
Reply With Quote
  #78  
Old 04-28-2022, 04:37 PM
Shade Tree Welder's Avatar
Shade Tree Welder Shade Tree Welder is offline
Grumpy Bastard
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Kankakee County, IL
Posts: 22,215
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ironman View Post
John, probably a read of the South Bend How to run a lathe would be a good first move.
Yes, good suggestion.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf How to Run a Lathe.pdf (3.74 MB, 24 views)
__________________
Shade

"Prepare to defend yourselves."
-- Sergeant Major Basil L. Plumley, Ia Drang Valley
Reply With Quote
  #79  
Old 04-29-2022, 06:29 PM
unfinished unfinished is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Rust Belt
Posts: 86
Default

Subscribing and watching the learning process. I've got a little Maximat V10P lathe sitting here that I've been wanting to resurrect. I'm going to add a VFD to replace the mechanical switches for low/high/reverse. I've never ran a lathe before so I'm glad to see this info here.
Reply With Quote
  #80  
Old 04-29-2022, 07:54 PM
pepi's Avatar
pepi pepi is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Woodstock, GA
Posts: 254
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnBoy View Post
Making chips!!!

I have zero clue what I'm at but I needed to run it for a bit so things I'm reading/watching have some context.

Awful amount of chatter so I need to figure all that out, but it's been taken apart and put back together with zero setup by someone with zero knowledge so it's a miracle it cut at all.

Tool at a random angle, below centre height, absolutely everything is wrong.

But I made chips!!
Is that a single pass, if yes try making a lighter (much) pass. Round stock in not always round, skim it to rid it of the high spots. After you make it round, able to make a light continuous cut. Then start digging in.

.030 is a heavy bite for that lathe.

Tool height to center important
Get the slop out and adjust the gibbs, you want them to drag as the cross slide is moved.

You will not get it exact first go around, in time you will find the sweet spot

A side note hand-ground HSS tools are MUCH easier & FORGIVING than I was led to believe.

They do not chip or shatter as carbide, I use both just saying. Don;t get too deep into carbide starting out.
__________________
The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Web Search:

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:09 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, vBulletin Solutions Inc.