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  #21  
Old 11-03-2016, 05:24 PM
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The weld only has to be as wide as the thinnest piece getting welded.
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  #22  
Old 11-03-2016, 06:28 PM
JBFab JBFab is offline
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Originally Posted by Rufus View Post

Thanks. I think I had the arc length a little to short. I notice on another tee joint weld that I ran, the weld bead was a little wider. I plan on continuing to weld 3/16 with the 1/8 rods with the amperage being 115 DC+ on the tombstone but for 1/4 and on up, I will switch to my Miller Thunderbolt and run AC at higher amps. Actually, at one time when I went out to the Missouri Welding Institute, I got good at running tee joints One fella that had been out in the field for a while said my tee joints looked better than a guy that had been welding for 20 years. Yeah, I will get better

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Tim
I'd bet on too long, it's not often one has too short an arc length with 7018. Don't bother with 7018 on AC, DC is where it's at.
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  #23  
Old 11-03-2016, 07:32 PM
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The weld only has to be as wide as the thinnest piece getting welded.
I can buy that. Extra weld metal added doesn't make it any stronger.

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Tim
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  #24  
Old 11-03-2016, 07:35 PM
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I'd bet on too long, it's not often one has too short an arc length with 7018. Don't bother with 7018 on AC, DC is where it's at.
Chances are then it was to long. The wider bead maybe an indication that I was making twitches along the way.

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Tim
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  #25  
Old 11-04-2016, 04:22 AM
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I'd bet on too long, it's not often one has too short an arc length with 7018. Don't bother with 7018 on AC, DC is where it's at.
With 7018 you run it where you can [I]just[I] feel the edges of the flux cone touching the material. If you twist the rod and bust the edges of the cone off and puss into it then you can wind up getting a bigger thicker puddle, like you did at the start of your pass

The section with holes, either some junk got in the puddle or you were dragging the rod, not letting it fill. I would bet you had a real long narrow puddle right there, didn't cha?

The latter third is ok, a bit more understanding of actions and reactions, or what you did to get that and what you need to do so you don't get that will come with good tutorial. Practice is good, practicing wrong moves is bad practice.
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  #26  
Old 11-04-2016, 12:18 PM
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...I do need a lot of practice...
When learning to weld the first thing you want to do is get some strength into the weld--decent penetration and even overlap will get you there. The weld in your pic might not be pretty but it looks like it will hold pretty well. Might not be good enough for pipeline or structural work but it would suffice for most "general" applications.

As you figure out the strength thing appearance will follow--you're at the stage where you'll see improvements with every practice session, just keep at it. Some of us have had years--or even decades--to practice so don't worry, it'll come to you.

Solo practice sessions are great but if you can find someone "better" than you to stand beside you and give you some tips you'll progress even faster...
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  #27  
Old 11-04-2016, 03:14 PM
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When learning to weld the first thing you want to do is get some strength into the weld--decent penetration and even overlap will get you there. The weld in your pic might not be pretty but it looks like it will hold pretty well. Might not be good enough for pipeline or structural work but it would suffice for most "general" applications.

As you figure out the strength thing appearance will follow--you're at the stage where you'll see improvements with every practice session, just keep at it. Some of us have had years--or even decades--to practice so don't worry, it'll come to you.

Solo practice sessions are great but if you can find someone "better" than you to stand beside you and give you some tips you'll progress even faster...
I have lost a lot of knowledge since leaving MWI back in 2003. A lot of what I learned back then might come back to me, but then maybe not. I have been watching a fella on youtube (Steve Bleile) and he lays it out pretty good, however I basically mimic what he does and plug on from there. I do hope to take an adult welding class on Saturdays once my back gets straightened out and have the instructor show me and go from there.

Thanks
Tim
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  #28  
Old 11-04-2016, 08:41 PM
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3/16" inch = 3/32 7018 @ 85-95 amps DC Suggestion, learn with 6010 or 6013 as I did. You will need to know both as when a rusty bit of crap needs a repair you will get the penetration without the prep. 6010 is a whip in and out for the bead, 7018 is a slight side to side advancement watching the sides. Just the way I learned 45 years ago. JMO
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  #29  
Old 11-05-2016, 01:48 AM
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3/16" inch = 3/32 7018 @ 85-95 amps DC Suggestion, learn with 6010 or 6013 as I did. You will need to know both as when a rusty bit of crap needs a repair you will get the penetration without the prep. 6010 is a whip in and out for the bead, 7018 is a slight side to side advancement watching the sides. Just the way I learned 45 years ago. JMO
Strange that you mentioned 3/16 = 3/32. I was thinking that the other day.
I was also thinking 1/4 = 1/8 and 1/2 = 1/4. I was taught that you would use a rod that was at least 1/2 the thickness of the metal. However, I don't use any rods above 1/8 so I would have to bevel a 1/2 inch thick plate joint and run 1/8 inch on it using multiple passes. I have lots of 3/32 inch 7018 and plenty of 1/8 inch 6013 and 6011. I am "ok" with 6013 and 6011 but need practice with 7018.

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Tim
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  #30  
Old 11-05-2016, 04:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Rufus View Post
Strange that you mentioned 3/16 = 3/32. I was thinking that the other day.
I was also thinking 1/4 = 1/8 and 1/2 = 1/4. I was taught that you would use a rod that was at least 1/2 the thickness of the metal. However, I don't use any rods above 1/8 so I would have to bevel a 1/2 inch thick plate joint and run 1/8 inch on it using multiple passes. I have lots of 3/32 inch 7018 and plenty of 1/8 inch 6013 and 6011. I am "ok" with 6013 and 6011 but need practice with 7018.

Thanks
Tim
Tim, one more tip. many times on a small bead run (either pipe or plate) when I was doing x-ray welds. Take that rod and clamp it closer to the business end and bend the remainder over the rod holder. Remember to remove flux where your clamping.
If I was doing 1/2 plate in 7018 it would still be 1/8 and just more passes to meet the spec. If I was doing 1/2 with 6010 3/16 5P rod is for me. I welded lots of 1/2" wall pipe with it mostly down hand.
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