Shop Floor Talk  

Go Back   Shop Floor Talk > Welding and Metalworking Forums > Blacksmithing & Forming

SFT Search:   
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 08-18-2019, 09:30 AM
Matt Shade's Avatar
Matt Shade Matt Shade is offline
Made From Scratch
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Ohio
Posts: 2,746
Default Forged Aluminum

I ended up playing with some aluminum this week. It's pretty interesting stuff to forge. You only leave it in the fire long enough that when you rub a piece of wood on it, it leaves a charred line on the aluminum.The aluminum will melt long before you see a change in color.

I turned the forge way down and still only had it in there for about a minute at a time. You really can't multi task and have more than one piece going because you can hammer on a piece ten times longer than you can leave it in the fire. The first time I tried this, I turned around and had a puddle running out the door of the forge

The aluminum moves faster under the hammer than steel, but maybe not the way you would think. It doesn't feel particularly soft, and still takes a decisive blow to move it, but poor hits leave much bigger dings and divots. Swinging had to be a little slower and very deliberate.

You also have to watch trying to turn it over the horn and especially the edge of the anvil as it will pinch easier than it will bend if you hit too close to where it is contacting the anvil.

I didn't get any progress pics but here is what I made. Wasn't a happy occasion, one of our customers show horses got sick and had to be euthanized after a week of ups and downs in a vet hospital. It was hard for everyone involved. It worked out that I had some of his old shoes in the shop, so I made this for the owners. This is made with a complete set of them. The outside shoes that make the heart were his back shoes, and the other two are his fronts, which I tried to leave the shape of his feet as much as possible.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	b001-DSCF1745.jpg
Views:	83
Size:	194.4 KB
ID:	151869   Click image for larger version

Name:	b003-DSCF1747.jpg
Views:	70
Size:	173.9 KB
ID:	151870  
__________________
Handcrafted Leather
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 08-18-2019, 01:16 PM
mccutter's Avatar
mccutter mccutter is offline
Post Fiend
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 8,469
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt Shade View Post
I ended up playing with some aluminum this week. It's pretty interesting stuff to forge. You only leave it in the fire long enough that when you rub a piece of wood on it, it leaves a charred line on the aluminum.The aluminum will melt long before you see a change in color...
What alloys were you using? Do they make horse shoes out of Al?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt Shade View Post
...The outside shoes that make the heart were his back shoes, and the other two are his fronts, which I tried to leave the shape of his feet as much as possible.
Horse Noob question: Are front and rear hooves different sizes? Which are bigger? I would guess rears are larger... And sorry for your loss. PS: nice work on the heart
__________________

TA Arcmaster 185 w/tig/stick kit
MillerMatic 252 w/3rd gen 30A
MM140 w/o AS, w/CO2
Hobart (Miller) 625 plasma
Hobart 250ci plasma
Victor O/A (always ready, but bored)
Lincoln Patriot autodark (freebie)
45ACP Black Talons for those stubborn jobs...
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 08-18-2019, 02:18 PM
Matt Shade's Avatar
Matt Shade Matt Shade is offline
Made From Scratch
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Ohio
Posts: 2,746
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mccutter View Post
What alloys were you using? Do they make horse shoes out of Al?



Horse Noob question: Are front and rear hooves different sizes? Which are bigger? I would guess rears are larger... And sorry for your loss. PS: nice work on the heart
Show horses that need shoes, often get shoes made of aluminum. The lighter weight of the shoe, has less effect on the swing of their leg, which is something the judges look at in certain events. Some horses need a corrective shoe, that is thicker at the heel than the toe, and these are also aluminum as making them from steel would be too much weight.

I don't know the alloy. I am sure it varies from one manufacturer to another. You can weld them with 4043 wire. It is hard to make clean pretty welds on them (spoolgun, would like to try tig where you can dwell on an area while it heats up), but they clean up with a wire brush.

On a typical horse, if you were to look at the footprint, a front hoof is close to a circle while the back feet are more of an egg shape. They should be similar width but the hind feet are longer front to back and the toe makes just slightly more of a point.
__________________
Handcrafted Leather
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 08-18-2019, 06:53 PM
mccutter's Avatar
mccutter mccutter is offline
Post Fiend
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 8,469
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt Shade View Post
I don't know the alloy. I am sure it varies from one manufacturer to another. You can weld them with 4043 wire. It is hard to make clean pretty welds on them (spoolgun, would like to try tig where you can dwell on an area while it heats up), but they clean up with a wire brush.
Thanks for the info! I learned something I didn't know today! I did a quick search and all I could find was a fancy anodized 6061 T6 1/2" thick shoe made from a "billet". LINK 6061 is certainly weldable with 4043.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Sport-Shoe---American-Equus.jpg
Views:	32
Size:	24.8 KB
ID:	151879  
__________________

TA Arcmaster 185 w/tig/stick kit
MillerMatic 252 w/3rd gen 30A
MM140 w/o AS, w/CO2
Hobart (Miller) 625 plasma
Hobart 250ci plasma
Victor O/A (always ready, but bored)
Lincoln Patriot autodark (freebie)
45ACP Black Talons for those stubborn jobs...
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 08-18-2019, 09:49 PM
greywynd's Avatar
greywynd greywynd is offline
I can dig it
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Wainwright, Alberta
Posts: 4,740
Default

Draft (work) horses like Clydes and Percherons will have feet close to the size of a dinner plate. And if they are really working, logging, plowing etc, will often have very aggressive spikes or ‘corks’, either fixed or threaded into the shoe.

Sometimes horses will only have front shoes, in case they kick out at other horses. Without the shoes on the rear they’ll do less damage.

Matt, if you want it shiny, polish it then clear coar it right away, before it can oxidize again.

Nice work, and a nice tribute.


Sent from my iPhone using ShopFloorTalk mobile app
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 08-18-2019, 10:11 PM
JBFab JBFab is offline
Elite Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: NorthCentral Wisconsin
Posts: 1,241
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by greywynd View Post
Sometimes horses will only have front shoes, in case they kick out at other horses. Without the shoes on the rear they’ll do less damage.


Sent from my iPhone using ShopFloorTalk mobile app
Around here, some of the trail riders only run fronts as well. They carry a bit more of their weight on the front than the back. I assumed that was part of the reason.

Also, some farriers run their clients barefoot. My wife's new farrier does this. I'm quite impressed with the attention to detail when rasping the toes. Much smoother than the last farrier we had.

Also, Mr. Shade, that is a beautiful tribute. Your friends are very fortunate to have you in their circle.

Sent from my mobile device using ShopFloorTalk mobile app
__________________
I believe the appropriate metaphor here involves a river of excrement and a Native American water vessel without any means of propulsion.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 08-18-2019, 11:21 PM
Matt Shade's Avatar
Matt Shade Matt Shade is offline
Made From Scratch
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Ohio
Posts: 2,746
Default

Thanks for the kind words everybody.

Between lesson horses, boarded horses, and horses that are in for training, there are about 80 horses at the farm at any given time. We have some barefoot, some with just front shoes, some with all 4 feet shod. It really just depends on what their job is and how often they do it. The main reason to put shoes on is when hoof wear exceeds hoof growth, but there are also times when you need to correct an angle, or provide more support to arthritic joints etc.

There are also lots of people looking for a problem in need of a solution they just invented. We have had some horses come in with some very wild stuff nailed to their feet and most of the time they were healthier when we got rid of it.

This is the (somewhat) local farrier/ horse shoer supply that our guy uses:
https://www.ken-davis.com/
If you look at the website you will see they stock a mind boggling number of styles of shoes, from steel to aluminum, to stuff you put on with glue, you can also get titanium shoes if you so desire.

After you've done this stuff for awhile you can look at the shoes a horse has on and make a pretty good guess at what his job is, and how hard he works at it. Maybe most folks wouldn't look at it the way I do, but I kind of equate it to walking into someone's workshop and seeing their tools. It tells you something about them, and I guess most of you guys can understand that.
__________________
Handcrafted Leather
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 08-20-2019, 01:03 AM
arizonian's Avatar
arizonian arizonian is offline
Elite Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Tucson, Arizona
Posts: 1,255
Default

Thank You for sharing that, Matt. Beautiful work.
__________________
Bill in sunny Tucson

I believe in gun control.

Gun Control: The ability to consistently hit what you are aiming at.

Weldor by choice, engineer by necessity.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 08-20-2019, 01:38 PM
Matt Shade's Avatar
Matt Shade Matt Shade is offline
Made From Scratch
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Ohio
Posts: 2,746
Default

Thanks!
__________________
Handcrafted Leather
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 08-22-2019, 07:43 PM
allessence's Avatar
allessence allessence is offline
Gadget Girl
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: MA, 01543
Posts: 6,426
Default

Nice work.

Sooting is also used for the forging of alum. When the soot leaves the alum it's at forging temps.

6061 can be welded with pretty much any of the 4000 or 5000 series of tig rod.

It really depends on whether it will be anodized later or not for color match.
__________________
_________________
Jennifer

If I defend myself I am attacked.

My meaningless thoughts are showing me a meaningless world.

My attack thoughts are attacking my invulnerability.

I'd like to think of something smart, but I don't want to hurt myself.

My google+ page

DoALL 36"
Another Johnson model J Project
Lathe? Maybe..... 1958 SBL 13"
Yeti Esseti Aka running welder on 3phase.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Web Search:

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:49 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.