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Old 08-09-2019, 08:40 PM
Lowe.Buuck Lowe.Buuck is offline
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Default Using a Speed Control for Temp Control

I have an old Dremel 219 Speed Control that I would like to use as a soldering iron temperature control.

Can I use the one pictured to power a soldering iron without letting out the magic smoke?

The manual states it is rated for 5 amps when controlling motors. Is there a way (short of just trying it) to determine if it will handle the load of a soldering iron?
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Old 08-09-2019, 09:09 PM
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Ironman Ironman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lowe.Buuck View Post
I have an old Dremel 219 Speed Control that I would like to use as a soldering iron temperature control.

Can I use the one pictured to power a soldering iron without letting out the magic smoke?

The manual states it is rated for 5 amps when controlling motors. Is there a way (short of just trying it) to determine if it will handle the load of a soldering iron?
That's around 500 watts, so it should be ok. Some of the light dimmer type speed controls (called scr) change to dc power. That should be fine in a resistance load.

Trying to find that magic temp that will not turn your nicely tinned tip black, eh?
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Old 08-10-2019, 05:09 PM
Lowe.Buuck Lowe.Buuck is offline
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Thanks for the reply Gerry.

I am aware there are resistive and inductive loads but I could not find anything online that discussed the differences in power supplies designed for each type.

I know this Dremel unit does not play well with my newer Dremel that has variable speed.

And yes, I have irons that definitely run on the hot side and seem to foul the tip quickly. Using this to control temp looked like a good repurpose if it will handle the load.
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Old 08-10-2019, 10:24 PM
Lowe.Buuck Lowe.Buuck is offline
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I tried it out and it works well.

With the dial set to 2-1/2, I had plenty of heat to clean up and re-tin 4 different tips.
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Old 08-10-2019, 10:36 PM
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I got this EDSYN 951 with an auction lot. I think I paid $5 for the lot but can't remember. This was a jewel in the junk. Got certifications covering the adjustment screws so that is a plus. I'm using it as we speak repairing a car wiring harness. I'll post separately on that "adventure" when I'm done.

Manual attached but they don't show any detail on the "circuit board". I might be coaxed to take pics of the inside if you need me to unless it tears the cert stickers...
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Last edited by mccutter; 08-10-2019 at 10:41 PM.
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Old 08-12-2019, 12:09 AM
Lowe.Buuck Lowe.Buuck is offline
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I might be coaxed to take pics of the inside if you need me to unless it tears the cert stickers...
Thanks for the offer. With my limited electronics abilities, getting a look wouldn't tell me much.

By the way, nice score on that unit. I missed a temp control soldering unit and a fancy de-soldering station at an estate sale this spring. They were sitting on the FREE table and another guy beat me to them.
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Old 08-12-2019, 01:36 AM
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GWIZ GWIZ is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lowe.Buuck View Post
Thanks for the reply Gerry.

I am aware there are resistive and inductive loads but I could not find anything online that discussed the differences in power supplies designed for each type.

I know this Dremel unit does not play well with my newer Dremel that has variable speed.
The basic part in your control is a TRIAC, that black thing,
search out "TRIAC speed control" for more info. Or TRIAC light dimmer.

in this case
two speed controllers in the same circuit will not work well, most do not synchronize with a second TRAIC.
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