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  #11  
Old 08-19-2019, 08:45 PM
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milomilo milomilo is offline
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Once a month sounds extreme. I flush mine about every two to three years, then date it with a sharpie.

You know you're getting old when the sharpie is one of the first things you look for when doing chores like that.
That is what I do. Have no clue as to the cause for the leak.
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  #12  
Old 08-19-2019, 09:03 PM
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Camaro Zach Camaro Zach is offline
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You know you're getting old when the sharpie is one of the first things you look for when doing chores like that.
Blue sharpie and my knife are two things I never leave the house without.
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  #13  
Old 08-19-2019, 09:31 PM
slip knot slip knot is offline
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I always replace the crappy plastic drain valves with a ball valve and hose thread. makes it much easier to drain and flush the tank when needed.
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  #14  
Old 08-20-2019, 09:23 PM
Lew Hartswick Lew Hartswick is offline
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Originally Posted by slip knot View Post
I always replace the crappy plastic drain valves with a ball valve and hose thread. makes it much easier to drain and flush the tank when needed.
I did that on the previous one but never got around to it on the last install. I don't trust those plastic ones to re-seal so dont do the "periodic" flush bit.
...lew...
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  #15  
Old 08-20-2019, 10:05 PM
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milomilo milomilo is offline
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I always replace the crappy plastic drain valves with a ball valve and hose thread. makes it much easier to drain and flush the tank when needed.
Wish you had told me that before I filled it with water. Now I have to remember that when I next flush it out.
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  #16  
Old 09-01-2019, 09:17 PM
bigb bigb is offline
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Originally Posted by slip knot View Post
I always replace the crappy plastic drain valves with a ball valve and hose thread. makes it much easier to drain and flush the tank when needed.
I do the same, and on electric water heaters I remove the cheap lower element it comes with and install a low watt density element like a Sand Hog. That way you'll never have to change the lower element which is the one that does all the work, as it will outlast the tank. The upper element seldom fails because it only works on cold startup, or when you draw too much hot water out of the tank.

Another tip, before draining an old water heater that you are replacing, open the drain while it is still pressurized and blow out as much crap as you can, then shut off the water and open the pressure relief valve and remove the inlet/outlet lines. It's drain a lot faster now.
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  #17  
Old 09-01-2019, 10:08 PM
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Originally Posted by bigb View Post
I do the same, and on electric water heaters I remove the cheap lower element it comes with and install a low watt density element like a Sand Hog. That way you'll never have to change the lower element which is the one that does all the work, as it will outlast the tank. The upper element seldom fails because it only works on cold startup, or when you draw too much hot water out of the tank.

Another tip, before draining an old water heater that you are replacing, open the drain while it is still pressurized and blow out as much crap as you can, then shut off the water and open the pressure relief valve and remove the inlet/outlet lines. It's drain a lot faster now.
All good ideas. Thanks.
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