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  #11  
Old 04-19-2011, 03:22 AM
thegoogman thegoogman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Harvuskong View Post
How high is the seawall??

You really do have a rather large challenge there.

The seawall is....maybe 12ft high? It used to be about 5ft from the sand to the top, but the wave took all the sand away when it was depositing the containers
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  #12  
Old 04-19-2011, 03:41 AM
thegoogman thegoogman is offline
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Originally Posted by midmosandblasting View Post
Welcome to the site.Pictures are covered in #1 FAQ . We will want to see a few from this project. I would think a demo saw would cost less total than a torch .Tires ,well I am sure they could get moved over here if they were State Side. Labor will eat into this , if a profit venture , to move the cargo and dispose of it. Good Luck on the deal.


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Thanks for the heads up! I'm not really planning on this being a money-making venture in any way--I'm more looking at ways I can help Japan rebuild, although I will be looking at some way of re-selling the contents of the containers, if I can. If it all gets too expensive, I'll probably bow out, though.

When you say "demo saw" do you mean a reciprocating saw? Or one of those "Firemen Saws"?
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  #13  
Old 04-19-2011, 04:08 AM
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GWIZ GWIZ is offline
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I would try a steel cutting abrasive disk that fits a 7-1/4" circular saw.

The blades can throw alot of sparks and set something on fire.

Be careful when using electric power tools with water. also use a GFI.
Cordless should be safer.

Here is some that were listed on e-Bay, Do not get Masonry cutting disks as they would be very slow cutting steel.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...VJoRrueP4%253D
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Last edited by GWIZ; 04-19-2011 at 04:48 AM.
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  #14  
Old 04-19-2011, 04:35 AM
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Demo saw, or Con saw is a euro term for em.

basically a chainsaw engine with a 14 inch angle grinder disk bolted on.


Major project you've got there.


A big track machine sitting behind the sea wall could probably drag them up with some chains, but there's gonna be no easy way to deal with those.
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  #15  
Old 04-19-2011, 08:29 AM
thegoogman thegoogman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnBoy View Post
Demo saw, or Con saw is a euro term for em.

basically a chainsaw engine with a 14 inch angle grinder disk bolted on.


Major project you've got there.


A big track machine sitting behind the sea wall could probably drag them up with some chains, but there's gonna be no easy way to deal with those.

Geez!! I've never seen a Demo saw before, and they look NUTS! Seems like something that someone slightly drunk came up with late in their workshop one night!

I have no doubt that it would be easier in a lot of ways to use one of these (no having to find propane/oxygen in a natural disaster area, for one), but I'm wondering about the weight--the Demo saws look significantly heavier to wield (that's wield, not weld ) than a torch, and with these containers about 8ft tall, using one over my head seems risky....which means ladders or scaffolding (on sand, no less!), in addition to the exhaustion factor. Anyone have any experience using one of these for several hours a day? I'm all for getting buff (this is at a beach, after all!) but is this even realistic?

All that said, a saw like this does seem a lot simpler for what I'm trying to do (chop metal into tiny pieces) than a whole torch setup. Hmmm....
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  #16  
Old 04-19-2011, 09:24 AM
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I think a rotating saw will get pinched too much.

These aren't sitting in a parking lot all nice and square, their
bunched and smooshed, and have locked in stress.

Plasma is fast, doesn't get pinched. But I don't see
our scrapping professional's using them, only when
absolutely necessary (stainless steel) as they are
fragile in the hostile enviroment of a scrap yard/earthquake
ravaged area.

Sheet metal is not a problem for scrappers, angle the torch
into the cut. Run a tip with HIGHER pre-heat than normal
so you can go fast.

Pay by the ton, not by the hour.


A large excavator should (with a thumb) be able to hook
onto most all of the containers (except the most heavily loaded
ones) and toss them over the sea wall. As they are jumbled up
terribly, putting a man down there to crawl over them to hook
a chain on them is treacherous.

Leave the people in the excavator cab, a good thumb attachment
should easily puncture the skin of the box, and get a good enough
hold onto it to lift it.
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  #17  
Old 04-19-2011, 09:25 AM
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The demo saws we have in the fire department are no heavier than a chain saw, which loggers use west of here for 12 hours per day. Need good eye and hearing protection, good gloves help with vibration protection for the hands and wrists.
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  #18  
Old 04-19-2011, 09:39 AM
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monckywrench monckywrench is offline
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Quote:
All that said, a saw like this does seem a lot simpler for what I'm trying to do (chop metal into tiny pieces) than a whole torch setup. Hmmm....
You aren't trying to chop metal into tiny pieces. You are trying to move it to get rid of it, with minimum work.

Scrappers use what scrappers use because scrappers don't make money unless they are efficient. Wreckage moves and shifts and pinches, and flames don't mind getting pinched.

Buy digger doug a ticket to Japan and keep him in geishas and sake so he can provide proper supervision.
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  #19  
Old 04-19-2011, 09:46 AM
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OOppss, multiple posting myself...

Last edited by digger doug; 04-19-2011 at 10:08 AM.
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  #20  
Old 04-19-2011, 09:56 AM
thegoogman thegoogman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
I think a rotating saw will get pinched too much.

These aren't sitting in a parking lot all nice and square, their
bunched and smooshed, and have locked in stress.
Hmmm...good point here about the stress factors. Some of the containers are in pretty good shape structurally, but none of them are sitting flat on anything...

Quote:
Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
A large excavator should (with a thumb) be able to hook
onto most all of the containers (except the most heavily loaded
ones) and toss them over the sea wall. As they are jumbled up
terribly, putting a man down there to crawl over them to hook
a chain on them is treacherous.

Leave the people in the excavator cab, a good thumb attachment
should easily puncture the skin of the box, and get a good enough
hold onto it to lift it.
True....unfortunately, pretty much all the heavy equipment in the country is booked solid for the next 5 years or so, doing important stuff--clearing houses/foundations/roads, etc. That is definitely a higher priority than what I want to do, but by the time the cleanup crews get around to the beaches, the containers will have sunk so much that it will actually be impossible to get to them...
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