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Old 01-14-2016, 08:33 AM
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Default How do you heat your shop/garage?

Due to global warmin' I need to heat my detached garage/shop. I have a small wood burning stove in there but when it gets down to -F'n cold it could glow red would not make it a real good working temp. I guess I need some help for the lil' fella. How's the kerosene jobs? Are they really smelly? Fumes? I do not have natural gas or enough electricity to go that route.
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Old 01-14-2016, 09:23 AM
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I quit using kerosene about the time I was 19. It makes me cry like a baby, and I was heating a fully insulated 3 car garage, with high quality, double pane windows.

Having some experience with wood stoves, heat output in comparison to btu input varies wildly with wood burners. In other words, if you happen to have a stove that sends most of the heat up the flue, a change in wood stove can make a massive difference in the retained heat in the garage.

I heat this house, with wood, at 0F and a 25mph wind pushing on the house with 22 big ass leaky windows, I keep it above 80 degrees, without trying. My old wood burner, could not do that, didnt matter how much wood you through at it. It was even a double wall stove, with a blower, and it could not do it. I now have a smaller stove, single wall, uses a fraction of the wood, and I have to be careful how much wood I put in it, so I dont over heat the house. Ive had to open windows in the past, because I accidentally got it too hot.

If you dont have gas, and cant do electric, that is my first reaction, a better stove. Kerosene is crazy expensive and the shit it puts in the air, Id rather freeze my butt off than heat with kerosene, but that is just my opinion.

What about a small propane bottle ( 100 gal or bigger ) outside and a regular forced air furnace in the shop ? Not sure on how many hours your looking to heat or how much heat your losing as to what size bottle you would need.
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Old 01-14-2016, 09:37 AM
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Need more details!

What size of shop?

How well, or is it insulated?

What sort of temperature is it maintained at, and how warm do you want it to get?

How full of inventory and equipment is it?

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Old 01-14-2016, 10:46 AM
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I have a 40+ year old furnace unit that was reclaimed from some house my Dad lived in as a kid. It's NG, but I'm sure it could've been converted to propane had it been necessary. I run it for an hour or so before going out to the shop to help knock the chill off all the tools, some of them don't like operating below 50°.

For more localized heating I keep your standard Walmart $20 electric space heater tucked up close to whatever I'm doing if it's safe. Mostly that keeps my toes warm so I don't have to change outta my sandals.

Here lately I've been playing with my kydex plastic toys, which includes a countertop toaster oven and a heat gun. They do a darn good job of heating the place up faster than I thought possible.

None of those are probably very practical for your needs, but that's how I do it.
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Old 01-14-2016, 10:54 AM
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I have in floor hot water heat but a lot of guys around here are using these.
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Old 01-14-2016, 11:05 AM
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I heat my shops and home with wood. Sounds like you need a largr stove.
I pile 250 KG of steel on top of the stove to carry over the night and keep the shop warmer until I can add wood in the morning .
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Old 01-14-2016, 11:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greywynd View Post
...How well, or is it insulated?...
That was my first thought.
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Old 01-14-2016, 01:34 PM
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diesel fuel via a torpedo heater and a thermostat on the wall.
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  #9  
Old 01-14-2016, 02:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by digr View Post
I have in floor hot water heat but a lot of guys around here are using these.
I use one of these and it works great in my 20x22 garage.

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  #10  
Old 01-14-2016, 06:06 PM
kbs2244 kbs2244 is offline
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Bubba,
Your location says Chicago.
Is that in the city?
If so, I am surprised that you have gotten by with wood smoke for any length of time.

Last winter, I built a 20x24 detached shop.
2X4 stick built with 4-inch fiberglass insulation walls and roof.
Everything old school construction except for a ridge beam roof to give me a 14 foot, vaulted ceiling.

While doing the insulation install and painting the guys used my kerosene heater. That dramatically showed the need for a ventilated heater. The condensation was amazing. The latex paint would not dry until the heater was shut down and the door opened to let the moisture out.

As luck would have it, my home furnace crapped out on Xmas weekend.
I got it fixed myself and I got to Easter before SWMBO won the argument and we got a new home furnace.

That left me with a working, NG, 150BTU, updraft, furnace.
It now sits in a corner of the shop.
No ductwork, just blowing straight up with a drugstore oscillating fan on the opposite wall for air circulation.

During our 0-degree period last week, my boy came over to work on his truck.
It was up to over 40 degrees within an hour.

What I am saying is check around with some local HVAC guys.
They often have working, or easily fixed, home furnaces they are just keeping for the scrap guy.

Since you are talking about a detached, no living space, install a lot of the code stuff does not apply. And you have a clean, neighbor and insurance company friendly, install.
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