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  #31  
Old 05-23-2020, 05:36 PM
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mccutter mccutter is offline
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Originally Posted by Shade Tree Welder View Post
Looks like a decent "starter" unit. You don't see many AC/DC TIG units at that price point ($690). The pedal is a "bonus", hopefully it is a decent unit.

Let us know when you get it--an "unboxing" if you will. Plenty of knowledge here we are happy to share...
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  #32  
Old 05-23-2020, 09:19 PM
Folkpunk Folkpunk is offline
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Looks like a decent "starter" unit.
Agreed. When you only know three chords you don't buy a Gibson sj-200, you get the Epiphone replica.
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  #33  
Old 05-24-2020, 10:21 PM
JBFab JBFab is offline
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Is there a rule of thumb to discern what metal you are welding on? Its one thing to differentiate between steel and alloy by looking at it, but distinguishing between different alloys seems more difficult. How do you know?
As far as discerning different metals - you'll get the hang of that by getting the feel for appearance and mass. Grades are a different animal. When buying new material you can specify. When buying cutoffs, you can sometimes see a stamp on the material with the grade. When scrounging you can do some research to find out what certain things are made of. For instance wide flange beams are typically A992, hot rolled bars are most commonly A36 this includes squares, rounds, channels, angles, flats. Cold rolled could be many things from weldable to not. You will learn to see what is cold rolled vs. Hot rolled by being able to detect mill scale (visually). Most square and rectangular tubes are going to be A500.

The above examples are some of the most common grades, but be cognizant that there are many many other grades in each shape - they are just less common.

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  #34  
Old 05-25-2020, 12:55 PM
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mccutter mccutter is offline
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Originally Posted by Folkpunk View Post
Is there a rule of thumb to discern what metal you are welding on? Its one thing to differentiate between steel and alloy by looking at it, but distinguishing between different alloys seems more difficult. How do you know?
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Originally Posted by JBFab View Post
As far as discerning different metals - you'll get the hang of that by getting the feel for appearance and mass.
Like JB said, you get a "feel" for what metal you have in your hand. A silver piece of metal will be lighter if it is Al and heavier if it is SS. That is a very basic example. A magnet can sometimes differentiate between mild steel and SS. There are "spark tests" that can be done with a grinder to determine the approximate alloy of steel. Mill scale usually means hot rolled mild steel. If it has rust on it, it is probably weldable with exceptions...

Alro Metals has guides you can download that will give a little more info. LINK
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TA Arcmaster 185 w/tig/stick kit
MillerMatic 252 w/3rd gen 30A
MM140 w/o AS, w/CO2
Hobart (Miller) 625 plasma
Hobart 250ci plasma
Victor O/A (always ready, but bored)
TA 95 lunchbox w/tig
45ACP Black Talons for those stubborn jobs...
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  #35  
Old 05-25-2020, 01:12 PM
Folkpunk Folkpunk is offline
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Originally Posted by mccutter View Post
Like JB said, you get a "feel" for what metal you have in your hand. A silver piece of metal will be lighter if it is Al and heavier if it is SS. That is a very basic example. A magnet can sometimes differentiate between mild steel and SS. There are "spark tests" that can be done with a grinder to determine the approximate alloy of steel. Mill scale usually means hot rolled mild steel. If it has rust on it, it is probably weldable with exceptions...

Alro Metals has guides you can download that will give a little more info. LINK
Thanks guys, I'll check out the link. Hopefully will have my machine next week. All the consumables have arrived. Need to go find some scrap metal to practice on.
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  #36  
Old 05-25-2020, 02:04 PM
JBFab JBFab is offline
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Do yourself a favor. Go to a metal supply store and buy a stick of of 1/8x2 flat bar. They will usually cut it in half for you at no charge. Cold rolled if you dont mind paying a bit more, hot rolled if you dont mind cleaning the mill scale off. I would go hot rolled so you get an understanding of how clean the metal needs to be for TIG.

The reason I recommend this is that if you start on scrap that you dont know the origin/history of you may end up with something dirty, rusty, and soaked in oil. If so you will end up with problems and inconsistencies that will get you angry and want to quit. Start with something relatively clean and learn on that before learning how to deal with dirty scrap. Also I recommend picking up a gallon of acetone and some blue shop towels to clean your material and filler. Wet the rag and wipe down the filler and the materials.
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Originally Posted by Folkpunk View Post
Thanks guys, I'll check out the link. Hopefully will have my machine next week. All the consumables have arrived. Need to go find some scrap metal to practice on.
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  #37  
Old 05-25-2020, 02:16 PM
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greywynd greywynd is offline
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I agree, a piece of 1/8” flat bar is cheap, you can also tell them the length doesn’t matter, you may be able to get drops (offcuts) even cheaper.

Trying to learn how to tig on ‘mystery steel’ would be a pain in the @ss IMO.


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  #38  
Old 05-25-2020, 10:41 PM
Folkpunk Folkpunk is offline
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Originally Posted by mccutter View Post
Alro Metals has guides you can download that will give a little more info. LINK
Perusing the pages here, a wealth of information. Thank you.
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  #39  
Old 05-25-2020, 10:46 PM
Folkpunk Folkpunk is offline
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Originally Posted by JBFab View Post
Do yourself a favor. Go to a metal supply store and buy a stick of of 1/8x2 flat bar. They will usually cut it in half for you at no charge. Cold rolled if you dont mind paying a bit more, hot rolled if you dont mind cleaning the mill scale off. I would go hot rolled so you get an understanding of how clean the metal needs to be for TIG.

The reason I recommend this is that if you start on scrap that you dont know the origin/history of you may end up with something dirty, rusty, and soaked in oil. If so you will end up with problems and inconsistencies that will get you angry and want to quit. Start with something relatively clean and learn on that before learning how to deal with dirty scrap. Also I recommend picking up a gallon of acetone and some blue shop towels to clean your material and filler. Wet the rag and wipe down the filler and the materials.

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\

Thank you. This will save me some frustration.
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