Shop Floor Talk  

Go Back   Shop Floor Talk > Welding and Metalworking Forums > Welding

SFT Search:   
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #31  
Old 01-10-2019, 09:20 AM
digger doug's Avatar
digger doug digger doug is offline
Not to be used as a Flotation Device
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: NW Pa
Posts: 11,628
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lu47Dan View Post
Got a big propane rosebud that needs two 60lb tanks ganged together to operate right, three would be better.
Used it twice so far, I have two adjustable lp regulators that I adjust to get the flame right. Too heavy a draw on the tanks and the torch will go out. I need to pick up another 60lb tank and regulator to really put it to use.
Dan.
Holy crap batman....you didn't swipe it off a large hot air balloon
with a welder painted on the side ????
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 01-10-2019, 09:48 AM
MetalWolf's Avatar
MetalWolf MetalWolf is offline
Lubrication Consultant
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: La Vernia,Tx.
Posts: 3,412
Default

Unless you are heating large areas of fairly thick gauge metal all ya nee is
a B tank and turbo torch no O2 needed... and if ya want a little more over all heat all ya need is a 5 lb propane tank and a pear burner no O2 needed

and ill say it again propane /O2 pressures will totally depend on torch and or rose bud size and thickness of metal

you can buy a preset regulator form LWS or if you must have adjustable regulator for propane they sell one as well and max pressure is 15.psi

so that alone gives you a gas range of 5 - 15 psi for working pressures
O2 then becomes dependent on the working pressure of propane you are using all dependent on torch size and application...

standard home shop size torch starts a 5-8 psi gas/p O2 is from 10- max 20 psi

larger size torches and rose buds like my 6 ft' victor torch takes a max gas psi of 15 and a max of 50 psi 02

the thing to remember is these set ups were not designed for production cutting it was designed for the salvage sand scrapping industry
will hey clean cut yes can you use it for product work yes but it is no where's as efficient for that as O/A is.

adjustment and working pressures will again be dependent on the metal thickness you are cutting and be dependent on the size of torch set or rose bud...

regulator adjustment working pressures are
5-8-max10 psi gas O2 10- max 20 psi general small home shop set

larger set ups working pressures...
10 - max 15 psi gas.... O2, 20- max 60 psi

and again working pressures dependent on equipment you are using and gauge of material.
__________________
MetalWolf, AKA---- Metallic Shapeshifter-----

I Have Only One Wish, To Achieve "Pura Vida" In All That I Do!
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 01-10-2019, 10:21 AM
biker55's Avatar
biker55 biker55 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: orange county ny
Posts: 181
Default

here's my propane set up. the heating torch is on top of the propane tank
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	KIMG0818.JPG
Views:	58
Size:	39.5 KB
ID:	148760  
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 01-10-2019, 11:05 AM
Ironman's Avatar
Ironman Ironman is offline
Iron Modification Investigator
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Warburg, Alberta, Canada
Posts: 13,645
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by biker55 View Post
here's my propane set up. the heating torch is on top of the propane tank
I have the same heating tip, and same setup, except mine is a Harris on a Victor mixer.
I also have heating tips by Harris up to 2.5" across. They all run on the same regulators as the cutting torch at 5psi fuel and 35 oxy. When using the big tips I have had to use electric heaters on the oxy and propane to keep them from freezing up. That was when bending a 3x7" bar, and thankfully I don't do that often.
I noted above some recommendation to cut with 15psi oxy....well if you are happy with a cut looking like a rodents breakfast that'll do it.

The heating fuel and ox can be regulated by the mixing valves.

The reason pressure is worth thinking about on a torch is because of the design of the oxygen jet. As you may know, when you want a super clean cut, and a #0 tip will cut it, you want to break out the #3 tip.
Why?
Because of laminar flow. A #0 tip is designed to flow to 3/4" before turbulence develops, and will retain its jet shape for that length and then it starts to widen out and boil up into a cloud. Increase the pressure to say, 65psi and the length of laminar flow will shorten drastically. Lower the pressure and the flow will lengthen much more, but not blow through a steel plate.
That is why there are different tip sizes.
A #3 tip will retain the laminar flow jet size up to 2 inches, so although it is oxy hungry, will perform a superior job on a 1/2" or 1" plate.

That is also why a clean cutting tip is important.

Further info if needed
__________________
Gerry
You got freedom of speech, if you don't say too much.
Aaron Neville

"I must abide by my core values, my ethical responsibilities and constitutional obligations. There can be a cost to acting on one’s principles, but there is a bigger cost to abandoning them.” Jane Philpott
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 01-10-2019, 11:30 AM
Lu47Dan's Avatar
Lu47Dan Lu47Dan is offline
Connoisseur of Old Iron
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: N/W Pa.
Posts: 5,971
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
Holy crap batman....you didn't swipe it off a large hot air balloon
with a welder painted on the side ????

Got it out of a dumpster at Hammermill when they were shutting it down. That and a few torch bodies that did not fit the rosebud tip.
Used it the first time to get a thread adapter out of a junk turbine pump housing, the second time was a 3-1/2" nut and bolt frozen into a pin boss on an old B/E crawler crane. Learned something that time, adding a 20#tank to the set up just freezes up the smallest tank. It runs well on a 100# cylinder but kind of tough to haul around.
But the extra volume of gas did help to rapidly heat the boss without heating the bolt. The rust finally gave up after heating with that rosebud.
Dan.
__________________
Tools to Men are like Shoes to Women , you can never have too many !!
Used diesel engines are an adventure anyway you look at them !!
Miller XMT-304 Multiprocess
Miller 10-E Wire Feeder
Miller Spectrum 2050 Plasma Cutter
Hobart AC/DC stick welder
Hobart 175 Mig
Craftsman O/A set
Turbo torch and B-tank
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 01-10-2019, 11:41 AM
digger doug's Avatar
digger doug digger doug is offline
Not to be used as a Flotation Device
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: NW Pa
Posts: 11,628
Default

IIRC the hot air balloon burners run on a liquid tap, and they have a vaporizer coil up top.

Or you could buy/make one of these, I assume you run no regulator, and
turn the bottle upside down:
https://flameengineering.com/collect...uid-torch-kits
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 01-10-2019, 02:32 PM
MetalWolf's Avatar
MetalWolf MetalWolf is offline
Lubrication Consultant
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: La Vernia,Tx.
Posts: 3,412
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ironman View Post
I have the same heating tip, and same setup, except mine is a Harris on a Victor mixer.
I also have heating tips by Harris up to 2.5" across. They all run on the same regulators as the cutting torch at 5psi fuel and 35 oxy. When using the big tips I have had to use electric heaters on the oxy and propane to keep them from freezing up. That was when bending a 3x7" bar, and thankfully I don't do that often.
I noted above some recommendation to cut with 15psi oxy....well if you are happy with a cut looking like a rodents breakfast that'll do it.

The heating fuel and ox can be regulated by the mixing valves.

The reason pressure is worth thinking about on a torch is because of the design of the oxygen jet. As you may know, when you want a super clean cut, and a #0 tip will cut it, you want to break out the #3 tip.
Why?
Because of laminar flow. A #0 tip is designed to flow to 3/4" before turbulence develops, and will retain its jet shape for that length and then it starts to widen out and boil up into a cloud. Increase the pressure to say, 65psi and the length of laminar flow will shorten drastically. Lower the pressure and the flow will lengthen much more, but not blow through a steel plate.
That is why there are different tip sizes.
A #3 tip will retain the laminar flow jet size up to 2 inches, so although it is oxy hungry, will perform a superior job on a 1/2" or 1" plate.

That is also why a clean cutting tip is important.

Further info if needed
Re check what is posted on PSI for o2 and then check the red link below at end of page highlighted red link it is as I posted the pressures other than that other was referring to O/A settings max pressure for fuel is 5-15 15 being max on fuel o2 10-65 psi 70 being max and dependent on metal thickness and equipment /torch tip size...
__________________
MetalWolf, AKA---- Metallic Shapeshifter-----

I Have Only One Wish, To Achieve "Pura Vida" In All That I Do!
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 01-10-2019, 02:38 PM
digger doug's Avatar
digger doug digger doug is offline
Not to be used as a Flotation Device
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: NW Pa
Posts: 11,628
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MetalWolf View Post
Re check what is posted on PSI for o2 and then check the red link below at end of page highlighted red link it is as I posted the pressures other than that other was referring to O/A settings max pressure for fuel is 5-15 15 being max on fuel o2 10-65 psi 70 being max and dependent on metal thickness and equipment /torch tip size...
Propane....the Op is dealing with Propane.

No pressure limit with Propane.
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 01-10-2019, 05:00 PM
MetalWolf's Avatar
MetalWolf MetalWolf is offline
Lubrication Consultant
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: La Vernia,Tx.
Posts: 3,412
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
Propane....the Op is dealing with Propane.

No pressure limit with Propane.
There is a pressure limit or it would not need regulators to regulate
the pressure will be dependent on the equipment you using....
and you are limited to the thickness of metal you can cut efficiently
and pressure is determined for optimal use....

you can not take a small propane torch tip or torch and use the total Max O2 psi of 65-70 and make it cut worth a crap low psi is 10 psi using torch dependent/(depending) on thickness or application used...

seems no one is paying any attention to the size of the equipment i.e. torch or rose bud used it pressure dependent on its min and max psi for efficiency to do its job correctly

that is why there is recommended pressures for both fuel and air and once you figure it out once you light it you will need to play with it for optimal use
and to optimize the lower limits and higher limits of ( what you set up you are using will allow) thin metal plate requires lower pressure to cut efficiently as where thick plate will require a higher pressure to heat and cut

to much o2 added to the fuel on a small or medium torch set will blow out just the same as with O/A would..... same as too much fuel will blow out when you ad o2 propane is more fickle than O/A
__________________
MetalWolf, AKA---- Metallic Shapeshifter-----

I Have Only One Wish, To Achieve "Pura Vida" In All That I Do!
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 01-11-2019, 08:33 AM
digger doug's Avatar
digger doug digger doug is offline
Not to be used as a Flotation Device
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: NW Pa
Posts: 11,628
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MetalWolf View Post
There is a pressure limit or it would not need regulators to regulate
the pressure will be dependent on the equipment you using....
and you are limited to the thickness of metal you can cut efficiently
and pressure is determined for optimal use....

you can not take a small propane torch tip or torch and use the total Max O2 psi of 65-70 and make it cut worth a crap low psi is 10 psi using torch dependent/(depending) on thickness or application used...

seems no one is paying any attention to the size of the equipment i.e. torch or rose bud used it pressure dependent on its min and max psi for efficiency to do its job correctly

that is why there is recommended pressures for both fuel and air and once you figure it out once you light it you will need to play with it for optimal use
and to optimize the lower limits and higher limits of ( what you set up you are using will allow) thin metal plate requires lower pressure to cut efficiently as where thick plate will require a higher pressure to heat and cut

to much o2 added to the fuel on a small or medium torch set will blow out just the same as with O/A would..... same as too much fuel will blow out when you ad o2 propane is more fickle than O/A
Uhm...Yeah...

Whatever you said.

You keep commenting on acetylene and it's 15 psi limit.

Do not cornfuse the OP please, it's obvious he/she has some misinformation
already, hence the ruined torch.

So let's stick with the OP's condition ONLY.
Propane, normal thickness's, and general purpose cutting.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Web Search:

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:16 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.