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  #11  
Old 08-22-2019, 07:49 PM
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wrought iron chain is excellent if welded. opened ended links not so good.

depending on the project it might warrant real hand forged links instead.
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  #12  
Old 08-23-2019, 09:42 AM
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It sounds as though you have something like this. I suppose that you could TIG weld the open links to make it stronger.

https://www.kingmetals.com/Catalog/I...emNumber=11138
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  #13  
Old 08-23-2019, 12:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by J. Whitton View Post
...A customer brought in some "handmade" wrought chain that they are wanting to use to hang a rather large antique sign. The chain links are made from .250" square stock and are approximately 2.5" long and 1.125" wide. This sign is a little over 100lbs.

Let me fist state that I know very little about wrought iron but I feel this would not be adequate for safely suspending such a large piece. I suggested that we replicate this look with a cold rolled link version. I've always thought of wrought iron chains being too brittle to be nothing more than decorative...
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Originally Posted by J. Whitton View Post
...Unfortunately the links aren't welded. In my opinion these appear to be mass produced by some automated process...
I think there is some confusion here as to the actual material the chains are made of. True "wrought" iron is an old material that is pretty rare these days. It hasn't been made commercially for some time and I highly doubt that these chains are made from it. It's much more likely that you're dealing with a plain mild steel. The term "wrought iron" is used a lot these days to refer to the process of making ornamental iron products like gates and railings but whether the stuff is hand-forged or not the actual material used is still just mild steel.

The term "cold-rolled" is also sometimes misunderstood--again it refers to a process and not to a material. All steel comes out of the mill in a hot-rolled form. It is the secondary process of "cold-rolling" that produces squares, flats and rounds to a more precise size with a smooth, scale-free finish.

The rolling process also adds a little strength. Probably the most common cold-rolled material in North America is A1018 steel--normal yield strength in hot-rolled form is about 58 kips while cold-rolled material will have a tensile strength of around 64 kips. A fairly popular machining steel is A1040 which in the hot-rolled state will have a tensile strength of about 76 kips; in cold-rolled form the tensile jumps to about 85 kips.

As for strength, if you're hanging a 100 lb. sign using two of those chains (I would presume you're using one on either end) that chain should be more than strong enough. If it makes you feel better you can close up each link with a touch of weld but I don't think it's necessary...
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  #14  
Old 08-23-2019, 12:22 PM
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With the continuous castors used today I thought most was 1020 . Learned something new today .
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  #15  
Old 08-23-2019, 01:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LKeithR View Post

The rolling process also adds a little strength. Probably the most common cold-rolled material in North America is A1018 steel--normal yield strength in hot-rolled form is about 58 kips while cold-rolled material will have a tensile strength of around 64 kips. A fairly popular machining steel is A1040 which in the hot-rolled state will have a tensile strength of about 76 kips; in cold-rolled form the tensile jumps to about 85 kips.
You are mixing metaphors, so to speak.

A kip is one thousand pounds, no reference to area.

On the other hand, ksi is one thousand pounds or one kip per square inch.

Carry on...
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  #16  
Old 08-23-2019, 01:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arizonian View Post
You are mixing metaphors, so to speak.

A kip is one thousand pounds, no reference to area.

On the other hand, ksi is one thousand pounds or one kip per square inch.

Carry on...
Picky, picky, picky. But yeah, you're right--ksi would be the....ummmm......correct term...
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  #17  
Old 08-23-2019, 01:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by midmosandblasting View Post
...With the continuous castors used today I thought most was 1020...
Around here 1018 is the most common cold-finish material. I've seen it in 1020 but not for some time. Turns out that 1020 is about 3000 ksi less than 1018...
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  #18  
Old 08-23-2019, 04:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LKeithR View Post
Around here 1018 is the most common cold-finish material. I've seen it in 1020 but not for some time. Turns out that 1020 is about 3000 ksi less than 1018...
You don't really mean that, do you?

3,000 ksi is equivalent to 3,000,000 psi.

Just pullin' your chain.
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  #19  
Old 08-23-2019, 10:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arizonian View Post
You don't really mean that, do you?

3,000 ksi is equivalent to 3,000,000 psi.

Just pullin' your chain.
Some days you just can't win...
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