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Old 07-30-2018, 05:47 PM
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Jim-TX Jim-TX is offline
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Default Skid steer for shearing mesquites?

I've run equipment a lot, but never a skid steer. I've got about 100 acres of mesquite that I'd like to thin out (a lot). I have a dozer, but it's really not big enough for a lot of the trees plus there is a lot of ground disturbance when digging trees. The trees vary in size from sprouts to 16" or 18" trunks. I could leave some of the larger ones and get rid of a lot of the medium to small ones.

Does anyone have any experience or knowledge about a skid steer with the shear attachment? I know the stumps would have to be sprayed to prevent creating an even bigger problem, but I can do that. If I were buying a skid steer, it would have to be used. Can't justify a new one. What are good brands and models? I know this is like asking who makes the best pickup, but I'd just like to hear some pros and cons especially from users.
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Old 07-30-2018, 08:51 PM
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Matt Shade Matt Shade is offline
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You should rent or test drive a couple before you try to buy anything. Its not just a ford chevy kind of argument, you have several control patterns to choose from and not all brands offer all patterns.

I have the most seat time on foot controlled machines. The levers steer the machine and your feet control the loader (one pedal lifts, the other curls), and that is what I run the best. If you have bad knees or ankles these machines can be a bitch to run though, and you have to keep the pedal area clean and the linkages greased.

Then there is ISO pattern which is all hand control. The left hand is the same as the joystick on a loader on a tractor, the right hand is a joystick to steer the machine. I find that these are easy to run, but harder to run smoothly. Its harder to meter your turning with just one stick.

The more common pattern for all hand control is to have both sticks steer and control the bucket. Your left stick forward and backward is your left wheels/tracks forward/backward. Left stick left and right raises and lowers the boom. Right hand forward/back is wheels/tracks forward and backwards, right stick left and right is bucket curl up and down. I need a couple minutes to adjust to this pattern but it offers the same smooth operation as a foot control machine for me with a little practice.

Its kind of like excavators having 2 different patterns. Some people can run either, some people foam at the mouth and cuss you for even suggesting they run the other style.

As far as brands. I favor new holland. I find they are smoother running and offer good power generally, and aren't overly difficult to work on. After that I have always liked Case, find them to be very smooth. I am not a huge fan of bobcat, I think they are kind of teeter tottery, and difficult to work on as well. John deere I have run some I really liked and some newer ones I really don't. Ran one called a scat track once and it was a nice running machine but i don't know where the hell it came from or who made it.

I suppose you could take the attitude that you will buy whatever you can afford and then learn to run it, but I would try to get seat time on a couple first.
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Old 07-30-2018, 10:17 PM
Farmersamm Farmersamm is offline
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Forget buying one, unless you plan on other uses for it. And like to work on old worn out equipment (depending on how deep your pockets are, and how new the machine is)

Rent one for about 11-1200 bucks per week, and tear up their stuff.

Shears suck. Slow, not very powerful, and leave splinters that kill tires, and hooves.

Buy a rotary saw like TurboSaw. About 7K(or less), and retains almost 100% resale value when you're done with it.

Tracked machines work best, no tires to fix.

I've had both shear, and saw equipped machines work on my place. Saw wins hands down.
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Old 07-30-2018, 10:36 PM
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For a one project use it may be easier to rent both the skid steer with the shear, unless you need a new toy.
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Old 07-31-2018, 01:48 AM
Rob65 Rob65 is offline
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I bought a skidstear because it came along at the right price and I had a bit of work for it.

The jobs I bought it for are long since done but it just keeps on getting used for other things. Way too useful to let go.

Saying that it is a bobcat and is a right pain to work on.

Rob


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Old 07-31-2018, 11:47 PM
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I’d reccomend renting a skid steer and tree puller for a weekend/week what ever you have the time for. That will allow you to get comfortable with the machine and you can do a LOT with a tree puller.

Once you’ve cleared all you can with the puller I’d rent a different machine and get a Marshall tree saw. They don’t run fast and blow junk everywhere, they are easily controlled and make cuts at or below ground level. I have a Gehl ctl 80 track loader and have rented a marshal several times. I’m very happy with the results and look forward to renting one again. Here’s my machine with a Marshall saw aginst a 12-14” oak https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ghGokrnrpIU

Which brand of machine will depend a lot on you. Rent a variety and get a feel For them. I can’t stand John Deere/new holland machines. They have a bunch of extra linkages to make them lift a decent height and every time you make a turn the bucket/attachment sways two-six inches from play in all the linkages. I’ve ran Deere’s with 400 hours and I’ve run them with several thousand and it only gets worse with time. On a hard turn you hear it bang about three times. They also have tapered pins on the boom on several spots. Very hard to repair if they are run loose. Foot operated machines for the most part which I don’t care for but it beats a shovel. They have a long wheel base which makes them ride nice but they turn wide. I love working on Deere skid steers. I have several customers with Deere’s and usually there is always one here. Right now there are two here. Very lucrative for me.

My neighbor has a Cat around 70 horse. Very good machine, short wheel base makes it a little harsher ride but you can actually control how deep a cut with this machine. Pilot control joystick for each hand with a foot throttle. Very easy to access the engine/pumps on this one. Only thing it’s ever needed was a leak repaired, that consisted of replacing an oring.

I have a Gehl CTL80 it’s a rebadged takehuchi. They also made them for mustang. I’d buy another one in a heart beat. My machine has 3,200 hours and you cannot tell it by the boom pins or operating it. It’s heavy but good lord it is powerful. I can outwork my father’s 955 simply because I can move faster. I’ve run a drum mulcher and the Marshall tree saw and the machine handled perfectly.

A good friend is on his third Kubota SV95. He does custom work and he can trade a machine back in before it has 500 hours and get a new machine with a little money down. His last machine he had to buy a bucket, it pushed the mount through the back of the bucket. It was a heavy bucket, they are just that dang powerful of a machine. Very nice to operate and ride good according to him.

I’ve ran a bobcat just long enough to know I don’t want to run a bobcat.
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Old 08-01-2018, 05:50 AM
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Must be a different way of thinking or something but I don't see the point of saws or shears for land clearing. All they do is knock the tree down; you've still gotta grub out the roots and pile all the debris. Use a decent sized excavator and you knock the tree down, dig out the roots and pile all at the same time. I watched a couple of videos of the Marshall saws working and they just seem very inefficient to me. In the time it took one of them to knock just one tree down a good operator with an excavator would have 3-4 trees in the pile roots and all...
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Old 08-01-2018, 07:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LKeithR View Post
Must be a different way of thinking or something but I don't see the point of saws or shears for land clearing. All they do is knock the tree down; you've still gotta grub out the roots and pile all the debris. Use a decent sized excavator and you knock the tree down, dig out the roots and pile all at the same time. I watched a couple of videos of the Marshall saws working and they just seem very inefficient to me. In the time it took one of them to knock just one tree down a good operator with an excavator would have 3-4 trees in the pile roots and all...
Maybe, maybe not. I own a skid steer. I don’t own an excavator. The fence row I’m working on surrounds 80 acres. Top gear for my skid steer is 7 mph. Top speed for a mini ex is 2.4. Your gonna pay for machine hours tracking it to and from.

An excavator big enough to remove the trees I’ve sheared would run $3600 a week. A Marshall tree saw is $110 a day rental.

I would go broke trying to “grub out all the roots”. So would most other folks. It’s not necessary. Treat with Tordon or similar chemical. That’s the niche the tree saws/shears fall in.
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  #9  
Old 08-01-2018, 09:26 AM
Farmersamm Farmersamm is offline
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Doesn't get any more efficient than this. And the results are what ya want for a pasture. Remember, you're gonna be driving over this land in years to come,, and you ain't gonna remember where thousands of stumps are

https://youtu.be/fxya9drhnpE
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  #10  
Old 08-01-2018, 09:32 AM
Farmersamm Farmersamm is offline
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Disposal is the biggest problem. Have to burn 'em, and that's the high liability issue. VERY HIGH LIABILITY.

We plan to up our insurance to 1mil when the time comes to burn,,,,,,,,and that's a bit low, believe me. Fire gets out of hand, and it can travel for miles.

You can file an approved burn plan with the County, and hire the local FD to come out while you're burning. That gets you off the hook......sorta.
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