Shop Floor Talk  

Go Back   Shop Floor Talk > Welding and Metalworking Forums > Mechanical & Electrical

SFT Search:   
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 10-10-2018, 06:18 PM
Lowe.Buuck Lowe.Buuck is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Minnesota, USA
Posts: 11
Default Lubricants Safe for "Yellow Metals"

I have an old snowblower that I'm putting back in service. I became aware that there are lubricants that are not compatible with "yellow metals" and will accelerate wear.

I have some "00" lube that is not marked as safe for yellow metals. I sent a couple messages to the company and got no response.

Further online research led me to Machinery Lubrication - The Effects of EP Additives on Gearboxes.

I found a datasheet on the "00" grease I have and it lists that it tested Copper Corrosion per ASTM D-4048 and passed.

Is Passing ASTM D-4048 enough to make it safe to use in a gearbox with a bronze gear?

If not, what standard must be passed for a lubricant to be labeled as "Safe for Yellow Metals"?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 10-10-2018, 06:28 PM
Matt Shade's Avatar
Matt Shade Matt Shade is offline
Made From Scratch
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Ohio
Posts: 2,511
Default

I don't remember the particulars but if you look up discussions on the harbor freight bandsaws the first thing everybody says is to change the oil in the gearbox, and they listed several types that were safe for yellow metals and worm gears.
__________________
Handcrafted Leather
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 10-10-2018, 07:48 PM
cutter's Avatar
cutter cutter is offline
Curmudgeon
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Lubbock,Texas
Posts: 32,321
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt Shade View Post
I don't remember the particulars but if you look up discussions on the harbor freight bandsaws the first thing everybody says is to change the oil in the gearbox, and they listed several types that were safe for yellow metals and worm gears.
Here is one relevant link.
It is post#3 to this old thread.
__________________
cutter
Housekeeping Staff: the Gatekeeper
Director of Policy, Syntax and Grammar (by appointment)

"Dr. Chandran, will I dream?"

Just Keep Walking

"... the catastrophe that awaits everyone from a single false move, wrong turn, fatal encounter. Every life has such a moment.
What distinguishes us is whether—and how—we ever come back.”
Charles Krauthammer 1950-2018
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 10-11-2018, 09:32 AM
JohnBoy's Avatar
JohnBoy JohnBoy is online now
Director of Languages
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Southern Ireland
Posts: 2,287
Default

Does ye're oil have GL numbers?

GL4 is what's normally used here in old gearboxes, but only things pre 1970 or so, anything newer is normally fine with GL5
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 10-11-2018, 08:41 PM
Lowe.Buuck Lowe.Buuck is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Minnesota, USA
Posts: 11
Default

Matt - I will take a look at that discussion.

Cutter - I took a quick read through that article, I'll have to read it all the way through.

JohnBoy - I don't know what the original lube is, or was. This is an old Simplicity blower. I'm guessing from the late 60's or 70's. The auger gearbox has been replaced and a decal added noting the upgrade. I don't know why it was changed. I have read that many GL5 rated lubes are not safe unless it is marked as safe. I just want to make sure the lube I use is safe for this gearbox.

There are a lot of discussions online about this issue. No definitive answers other than to select a lube marked as "Safe for Yellow Metals". I'm trying to determine what test is used to meet this requirement.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 10-12-2018, 07:25 PM
Shade Tree Welder's Avatar
Shade Tree Welder Shade Tree Welder is offline
Grumpy Bastard
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Kankakee County, IL
Posts: 18,835
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnBoy View Post
Does ye're oil have GL numbers?

GL4 is what's normally used here in old gearboxes, but only things pre 1970 or so, anything newer is normally fine with GL5
No and No.

GL 4 and 5 are for automotive gear boxes and do not have brass or bronze components.
__________________
Shade

"Prepare to defend yourselves."
-- Sergeant Major Basil L. Plumley, Ia Drang Valley
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 10-12-2018, 09:10 PM
Matt G. Matt G. is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Wichita, KS
Posts: 154
Default

I went through this trying to find a suitable lube for the gearbox on my old delta 14" bandsaw. I settled on a GL-3 140w gear oil. Hopefully that is ok for my application. If I learned one thing, there is a lot of BS and misinformation floating around on the 'net about what each GL spec is and isn't safe for.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 10-13-2018, 09:51 AM
Shade Tree Welder's Avatar
Shade Tree Welder Shade Tree Welder is offline
Grumpy Bastard
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Kankakee County, IL
Posts: 18,835
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt G. View Post
I went through this trying to find a suitable lube for the gearbox on my old delta 14" bandsaw. I settled on a GL-3 140w gear oil. Hopefully that is ok for my application. If I learned one thing, there is a lot of BS and misinformation floating around on the 'net about what each GL spec is and isn't safe for.
GL-3 is obsolete.

Here is a good discussion of automotive gear oils and the effect of sulfur on
yellow metals.

https://www.widman.biz/uploads/Transaxle_oil.pdf

I had a customer and high end grease manufacturer in our labs this week
for training, part of our discussion landed on ASTM D130 test method. it is
used for determining copper corrosion by the discoloration of the copper.
Many chemist have been for years trying to get weight loss (and gain) on
the copper test specimen to be included as part of the results. So far no
movement as it would create a lot of questions on what it means.

But a 1A for 1B result which for decades has been assumed to me no copper
corrosion, is not really true, you can get erosion of the surface with a net
lost in copper but the chemistry in use is still giving a 1A 1B result.

GL-X specification are for automotive gear oils.

You need an industrial gear oil free of sulfur and phosphorus to prolong your
gears in your industrial equipment.

Cutter linked to the thread with my recommendations, they have not
changed in 10 years.
__________________
Shade

"Prepare to defend yourselves."
-- Sergeant Major Basil L. Plumley, Ia Drang Valley
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 10-13-2018, 10:22 AM
Shade Tree Welder's Avatar
Shade Tree Welder Shade Tree Welder is offline
Grumpy Bastard
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Kankakee County, IL
Posts: 18,835
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lowe.Buuck View Post
I have an old snowblower that I'm putting back in service.
What viscosity grade does the manual recommend?
Attached Files
File Type: pdf SHC 600 Series Gear Oils Circualting Oils Mobil.pdf (1.22 MB, 13 views)
__________________
Shade

"Prepare to defend yourselves."
-- Sergeant Major Basil L. Plumley, Ia Drang Valley
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 10-13-2018, 06:49 PM
JohnBoy's Avatar
JohnBoy JohnBoy is online now
Director of Languages
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Southern Ireland
Posts: 2,287
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shade Tree Welder View Post
No and No.

GL 4 and 5 are for automotive gear boxes and do not have brass or bronze components.
Rover, and some other British auto and motorcycle manufacturers, did use brass and bronze bushes and baulk rings back in the day.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Web Search:

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:18 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.