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  #11  
Old 06-01-2019, 11:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greywynd View Post
Just use the closest size pipe thread for the part you are dealing with.
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Originally Posted by mcostello View Post
If You run out of plumbing pats a countersunk socket head bolt will also, although the angle is steeper.
Doesn't that leave you with a tapered adapter with one actual high spot?
That just sounds like it would not provide a very secure grip or am I missing something?
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  #12  
Old 06-01-2019, 11:20 PM
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Chris. are you talking about the 5C expanding arbors?? seems to me it would be far cheaper to buy the set from CDCO, over the time it takes in making one/some. but that just IMO
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  #13  
Old 06-01-2019, 11:33 PM
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Originally Posted by cutter View Post
Doesn't that leave you with a tapered adapter with one actual high spot?
That just sounds like it would not provide a very secure grip or am I missing something?
I suspect it's like using a tapered arbor. The ones I've seen are about 6 inches long or so and they taper .001 from one end to the other. The hole in the part is a very close fit and you press the part toward the "thicker end". You do it in of all things, an arbor press.

Tapered arbors and expanding mandrels are never around when you really, need one.


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  #14  
Old 06-01-2019, 11:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cutter View Post
Doesn't that leave you with a tapered adapter with one actual high spot?
That just sounds like it would not provide a very secure grip or am I missing something?
I suspect it's like using a tapered arbor. The ones I've seen are about 6 inches long or so and the taper .001 from one end to the other. The hole in the part is a very close fit and you press the part toward the "thicker end". You do it in of all things, an arbor press.


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  #15  
Old 06-01-2019, 11:41 PM
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  #16  
Old 06-02-2019, 02:22 AM
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  #17  
Old 06-02-2019, 09:14 PM
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Pipe taper is less, so more secure, countersunk allens give more room, take up less space.
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  #18  
Old 06-05-2019, 02:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cutter View Post
Doesn't that leave you with a tapered adapter with one actual high spot?
That just sounds like it would not provide a very secure grip or am I missing something?
not quite a taper. it is machined straight.
The idea is to turn the diameter to the same, not less than 0.0005 smaller than your bushing ID.......

If you get the right tension on the screw you can turn the OD the same size, back off the screw, slide a bushing on, a slight turn of the screw will lock it without any high spot.
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  #19  
Old 06-05-2019, 11:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GWIZ View Post
...not quite a taper. it is machined straight.
The idea is to turn the diameter to the same, not less than 0.0005 smaller than your bushing ID...
Expanding arbors are made of soft, machinable steel and are meant to be turned to a precise diameter for use. Tighten them securely in your chuck, apply a little tension with the adjusting screw, machine to the required OD, mount your part and machine it to size. They have no taper but once mounted and turned the arbor stays true to the centre line of the spindle till you remove it. Pic 1. is typical.

Standard precision mandrels are generally meant to be used between centres and are hardened and ground to precise diameters with a taper of .005" per inch or less. They come in a wide range of sizes. To use them you slide your part on the small end of the mandrel tap it on the large end to seat the part and then run it between centres to do your turning. If you have the capabilities you can grind one of these to any diameter you desire. Pic 2

Precision expanding mandrels are exactly that, a tapered mandrel with an expandable sleeve that has a matching taper on the inside. They usually have a diameter range of about 1/8". Pic 3.

When using any of these tools it's important that the bore of your part is precisely sized and finished if you want to achieve precise and consistent results...
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