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  #31  
Old 11-30-2018, 02:05 PM
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You should have an index pin inside the spindle that indexes with the slot in the collet.
With Import collets, I had problems with the slots in the collet being a bit on the small side.
With any new collets you should push them up into the spindle and make sure the collet slides freely and seats into the spindle with out the draw-bar, just by hand.

The other
my import collets they failed to thread them all the way through, the draw-bar would pull up the collet just shy of seating the taper.
check the threads in the collets for full depth.

one more, In less they did something stupid.
when you slide the collet into the spindle the pin should index with the slot in the collet before the draw-bar can screw into the collet.
people that have replaced draw-bars that were too "long" have sheared off the pins by tightening before indexing the collet.

The main three sizes I use are 3/8", 1/2", 3/4"

Others not as much 1/8", 3/16, 1/4"
5/16 for center drills.

End mill holders will give you a little more length in some cases just enough so you don't have to raise or lower the head. just switching from holder to collet, drill chuck.
BTW they do not make a R8, 1" collet so a holder it is. that is in less you buy some other collet system.
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  #32  
Old 11-30-2018, 02:22 PM
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Also it helps a lot to have a long center drill when spotting holes, especially when drilling rounds so you don't need to move the head when you install the needed drill bit. They come in different lengths.
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Last edited by digr; 11-30-2018 at 02:32 PM.
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  #33  
Old 11-30-2018, 02:34 PM
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Originally Posted by GWIZ View Post
End mill holders will give you a little more length in some cases just enough so you don't have to raise or lower the head. just switching from holder to collet, drill chuck..
That is what I am working on acquiring but am just buying one or two at a time as I need them and is easier than raising an lowering the head I know of a few of these machines like mine and Chris's but they have stripped out the gears from raising and lowering and now just sit idle so I see the holders saving some wear on the gears and the PITA of raising it.
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  #34  
Old 11-30-2018, 04:18 PM
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Progress was pretty slow today. Did get the table modified so the base sits down inside without being in a bind and it is level now. Welded 4 pieces of 1 1/2" angle so now the base sits down in about 1/2" Went to cut a piece of 9X13 chuck of 1/2" plate for the base on the vise. Got 90% of the cut and POOF, went the torch. Must have had the torch nut a little loose.

After that the oxy valves did not work correctly. So swapped the Victor with a Harris and went to turn the gas back on and heard a hiss. Hose was cracked next to the torch end. CRAP. Got a good used set of hoses a year ago so then began the swap of the hose connectors. Couple hours later all is good.

Next to order a rebuild kit for the Victor. The Harris is OK but I have almost all Victor tips. I do plan to make the Harris a propane set up some day.
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  #35  
Old 11-30-2018, 04:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GWIZ View Post
You should have an index pin inside the spindle that indexes with the slot in the collet.
With Import collets, I had problems with the slots in the collet being a bit on the small side.
With any new collets you should push them up into the spindle and make sure the collet slides freely and seats into the spindle with out the draw-bar, just by hand.

The other
my import collets they failed to thread them all the way through, the draw-bar would pull up the collet just shy of seating the taper.
check the threads in the collets for full depth.

one more, In less they did something stupid.
when you slide the collet into the spindle the pin should index with the slot in the collet before the draw-bar can screw into the collet.
people that have replaced draw-bars that were too "long" have sheared off the pins by tightening before indexing the collet.

The main three sizes I use are 3/8", 1/2", 3/4"

Others not as much 1/8", 3/16, 1/4"
5/16 for center drills.

End mill holders will give you a little more length in some cases just enough so you don't have to raise or lower the head. just switching from holder to collet, drill chuck.
BTW they do not make a R8, 1" collet so a holder it is. that is in less you buy some other collet system.


I can’t remember the last time I used a mill with an intact pin inside the spindle.

Common collets I use in a mill would be 1/4, 3/8, 1/2, 5/8 and 3/4.

Occasionally would be 1/8, 5/16, and 6, 8, 10 and 12 mm. Metric sizes are due to working in metric now and again, not something most home users, particularly you folks in the US.

Anything else would be seldom used, though I’d keep them around for the ‘just in case’.


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  #36  
Old 11-30-2018, 05:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MetalWolf View Post
So are you guys talking of using hockey pucks for the feet on a stand and spacers for elevating the equipment from the stand over a solid rubber....

What are hockey pucks made out of ? this is an interesting concept and sounds very plausible and I'm just trying to understand a bit more about it
Hockey pucks are made from rubber, but they have a very high resistance to compression. My Surface Grinder's cabinet sets on hockey pucks on the floor. The pucks isolates the surface grinder from the floor. Extraneous vibrations from other equipment can show up in the surface finish of the parts you are grinding.
Hockey pucks are tough bastards, they don't crush down like most rubber matting does.
I have a project started making new leveling pads for my lathe. A heavier mill, ie. A Wells - Index, Bridgeport, and other knee mills usaully do not need isolation from the floor.
I made caps from slices of pipe and turned caps to capture the puck. I think I used a 60 chamfered blind hole for the adjuster to rest in. Weld the cap to the pipe and you are done.
Dan.
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  #37  
Old 11-30-2018, 07:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by terry lingle View Post
This is a mill you are talking about right.
Mills are ballanced machines and should not vibrate in use unless you deliberatly use an unbalanced tool and try to damage the most expensive bearing inthe mill with that tooling.
Having dealt with dear old Mildred for several years now and having replaced the rattling bearings and the flopping belts she was wearing during her early abusive life, I have seen no reason to worry about vibration.
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  #38  
Old 11-30-2018, 08:03 PM
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Originally Posted by GWIZ View Post
BTW they do not make a R8, 1" collet so a holder it is. that is in less you buy some other collet system.
GWIZ,

yes they do make a 1” R8 collet, I have one, I would never use it, as it’s construction is terrifying. It holds the end just below the spindle, and the clamp is in not solid, it’s 3 segmented arcs. I should have sent it back, but I was too embarrassed to actually admit, I bought it
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  #39  
Old 11-30-2018, 09:19 PM
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The first thing I do with an R8 spindle is remove that index screw.
A colllet that is properly tightened will never slip. a loose collet will let the tooling move in the collet.
I have seen what happens when that pin gets jammed on a collet and it is not pretty.
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  #40  
Old 11-30-2018, 09:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by terry lingle View Post
The first thing I do with an R8 spindle is remove that index screw.
A colllet that is properly tightened will never slip. a loose collet will let the tooling move in the collet.
I have seen what happens when that pin gets jammed on a collet and it is not pretty.
Is a big job to get it out?
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