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Old 07-10-2018, 05:25 AM
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MetalWolf MetalWolf is offline
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Default Vineger bath for mill drill table

It has been suggested that I need to give a good white Vinager bath soaking to my mill drill table it has alot of rust on top of the table....

It has rust from sitting in a not so seald storage, I noticed it has some play in the table but everything looks new under neath as if it were still factory finish

Now when I got this thing I was told it was used only a couple of times at most, It then sat after the mans passing untill family sold it and other equipment off....

I am also thinking the 6" vise may be a bit much in size and weight for this mill drill in my opinion

Any advise on cleaning up and table set up for best operation ??

Thanks
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Last edited by MetalWolf; 07-10-2018 at 06:48 AM.
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Old 07-10-2018, 08:29 AM
Farmersamm Farmersamm is offline
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I'd be afraid of dunking my table in acid. It might take off the rust, but it's also taking off metal I'd think.

What works pretty good for something like this is a brass cup brush on a die grinder. The brass is soft enough that it doesn't tear up the metal, but will knock off the rust layer. You know you're good when you don't see any marks on the metal after you're done. Keep the dwell time short, don't just lean on it in one spot. And don't apply a ton of pressure to the grinder.

Nothing is absolutely ideal, but if you're in a position of excessive rust, you really don't have any alternatives.

Personally, I'd stay away from ScotchBrite too. It will remove some metal, even in the less aggressive grit. Steel wool is preferable.
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Old 07-10-2018, 11:33 AM
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Vinegar may work, it's pretty weak. I tend to like HCL, wipe it on and watch it work, and then rinse with baking soda.
Do not let someone talk you into electrolytic rust removal. It removes the carbon granules in the casting as well as rust and creates a crumbly sponge.
The process works wonderfully on steel, but is a no-no for castings.

The thing to remember if you are breaking a sweat about removing metal, that has already been done. Rust has converted iron molecules into iron oxide, the same process as your cutting torch, but slower. Clean off the rust with a angle grinder and brush, and look at it with a magnifying glass, and you will see pits and pockets.

This is not all bad, it will hold oil in there, which is why manufacturers create the "hand scraped" look on sliding ways to hold oil.
So if you want to have a clean machined surface as new, that won't happen unless you put the table in your surface grinder. This would guarantee a flat clean surface.
I would not recommend this as you seem to have a tendency to make things break
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Old 07-10-2018, 12:44 PM
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Quote:
=Ironman;716844
I would not recommend this as you seem to have a tendency to make things break
ROLMAO! Shit Happens! .... In My Defense.. It is not intentional these were well used and abused equipment when I got them... So I'm sure it were not me totally at fault...

Quote:
=Ironman;716844
So if you want to have a clean machined surface as new, that won't happen unless you put the table in your surface grinder
No I don't think I had even a brain fart thought of surface grinding the table.
and the ways as I mentioned look factory no wear on them... it is the top of the table that looks like heck

And so I was cautioned on the side of "Not to use and Angle Grinder" even with a soft brush to clean it off was told to soak it in vinegar over night then wash it off an oil it real good....

Bottom line was, I wanted to clean up the surface rust some not for aesthetics reason but easier to keep clean as you say "spongy rusty sort of layer" an that to me seems to make it hard to brush the chips away

Which is why I am asking as I want to do what is necessary if it's necessary
or do I just adjust the table to the ways' and leave it alone...
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Old 07-10-2018, 12:55 PM
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Keep an eye out and find the biggest abrasive stone you can find, and gently run it over the table. Keep an even, consistent pattern, and just take the worst of the rust off.

The more you use the mill, the table will clean up some on it’s own.


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Old 07-10-2018, 01:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greywynd View Post
Keep an eye out and find the biggest abrasive stone you can find, and gently run it over the table. Keep an even, consistent pattern, and just take the worst of the rust off.

The more you use the mill, the table will clean up some on it’s own.


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Ok Thanks I will see what I have or can find
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Old 07-10-2018, 02:29 PM
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restaurants use those stones on their grills
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Old 07-10-2018, 06:33 PM
mike anderson mike anderson is offline
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WD 40 and double aught steel wool. Rub lightly.

Cleaned the table on my 1920's Becker mill up nicely.
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Old 07-10-2018, 11:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by digr View Post
restaurants use those stones on their grills
I think they are called pumice stones.
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Old 07-10-2018, 11:38 PM
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Been working at it found that with a little synthetic 5w 20 and a few paper towels and a small stainless tooth brush size brush with soft bristle works fairly well, It appeared much worse than it was and the rust started coming off easily.

May not be shiny metal in appearance but its looking cleaner and cleaner figured I let it sit with oil on it over night and see how much more comes off with very little elbow effort.

Also got the Gibbs and Ways cleaned up nicely too... So I guess no vinegar bath or radical type of cleaning is needed...….
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