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  #11  
Old 04-05-2018, 09:58 PM
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yes sounds like a patience project,

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  #12  
Old 04-05-2018, 11:02 PM
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How about a dremel or small pencil grinder?


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  #13  
Old 04-06-2018, 08:16 AM
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Chris, that's why inletting is so expensive, patience is absolute.

I use my Dremel and Foredom tools for roughing in, but the final fit is achieved with cabinet scrapers and reworked wood carving knives, as even light sanding, with flint paper, will leave abrasives embedded in the wood, very tough to get out.

I have 'glass beded a few shotgun stocks, (to correct an over zealous amateur inletting job on expensive wood) but that is a whole 'nother kettle of fish.

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  #14  
Old 04-06-2018, 10:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RED caddy View Post
Chris, that's why inletting is so expensive, patience is absolute.

I use my Dremel and Foredom tools for roughing in, but the final fit is achieved with cabinet scrapers and reworked wood carving knives, as even light sanding, with flint paper, will leave abrasives embedded in the wood, very tough to get out.

I have 'glass beded a few shotgun stocks, (to correct an over zealous amateur inletting job on expensive wood) but that is a whole 'nother kettle of fish.

RED
I just remembered I have a detail sander that may work well on the half moon areas. 3" of snow here so far today. May not get out to the wood shop today.
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  #15  
Old 04-06-2018, 12:27 PM
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May not get out to the wood shop today.
Not that it gets that cold down here Chris, but it's still cold enough for me to do all of my final stock and gun works in a spare bedroom.


Chris, one thing to remember, you'll probably get to a point of having a good fit just about the time you thought you should have stopped and checked that one last time.


Like Red mentioned and I agree, having a nice assortment of scrapers and the like are the way to go. I've used wooden dowel wrapped for good hand working the fits as well. A little soot gives a wealth of detail when fitting iron chunks to wood when used sparingly.
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  #16  
Old 04-06-2018, 01:39 PM
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Originally Posted by LW Hiway View Post
May not get out to the wood shop today.
Not that it gets that cold down here Chris, but it's still cold enough for me to do all of my final stock and gun works in a spare bedroom.


Chris, one thing to remember, you'll probably get to a point of having a good fit just about the time you thought you should have stopped and checked that one last time.


Like Red mentioned and I agree, having a nice assortment of scrapers and the like are the way to go. I've used wooden dowel wrapped for good hand working the fits as well. A little soot gives a wealth of detail when fitting iron chunks to wood when used sparingly.
The wood shop is heated, but usually only keep it around 45F. I have a lot of sizes of dowels That are real handy wrapped with sandpaper. I have had the stock on and off at least a dozen times to make sure I have not went too far. There is no rush in my mind for this job.
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  #17  
Old 04-15-2018, 04:43 PM
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The last week was kinda busy, but finally got out to the wood shop today. Got most all the roughing in done on the butt stock using sandpaper and a Exacto knife. I am within a 32nd of final fit now.

Used the oscillating spindle sander to rough out the fore stock to match the barrel diameter. Still have some hand sanding to do. Can't do much more until I get the hardware back from the gun stock seller, as they forget to send it back with the stocks. She said it was going in the mail last Wednesday. Need the hardware so I can mount the latching mechanism that locks the fore stock to the barrel.

Mostly a lot of file work now to get that tight fit. After the inletting, then it will be the final sanding and grain filling. Then finally I can start the wood finishing. That is the best part when you can see the grain of the wood pop out!!!
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  #18  
Old 04-16-2018, 05:21 AM
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Chris, I've held and fondled so many old guns with broken wood it's just a shame.


Some trains of thought will tell you it was due to too good of a tight fit of wood to iron with no growth space. Which I would assume a seeing on the high dollar 10k and up guns there is none. so???????


With the old guns, especially the shotguns 75 or so years old and have split stocks etc is more due to climate and care as well as bad overloaded shells.


I know with the LC Smith, this bad boy was made long before there were traditional shotgun shells available and I'm sure as well that the loads in the early guns were not on the same pressure values as of powder of today.


With my smith I'll only shoot my reloads and light at that. I'm no pro and I will accept any corrections to/of this to be had.


Back to the furniture. Have you decided on dark matt finish rub or high gloss rub finish?


Coming along nicely.


FWIW, it got expensive for me to hire/send/ship old wood to have new pieces shaped and built a simple pantograph for routing. I can use it for all string instrument builds, handles for fly rods and all matter of gun stocks, forepieces, molds, etc etc etc.


One of the best cheap investments I've made for my little shop.
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God, if you would grant me one request through Prayer, please help me be the Man my Dog thinks I am. Please.

Quoting "The Hunt". "A man will walk into hell with both eyes and arms wide open. His dog will know better."

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  #19  
Old 04-16-2018, 09:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LW Hiway View Post
Chris, I've held and fondled so many old guns with broken wood it's just a shame.


Some trains of thought will tell you it was due to too good of a tight fit of wood to iron with no growth space. Which I would assume a seeing on the high dollar 10k and up guns there is none. so???????


With the old guns, especially the shotguns 75 or so years old and have split stocks etc is more due to climate and care as well as bad overloaded shells.


I know with the LC Smith, this bad boy was made long before there were traditional shotgun shells available and I'm sure as well that the loads in the early guns were not on the same pressure values as of powder of today.


With my smith I'll only shoot my reloads and light at that. I'm no pro and I will accept any corrections to/of this to be had.


Back to the furniture. Have you decided on dark matt finish rub or high gloss rub finish?


Coming along nicely.


FWIW, it got expensive for me to hire/send/ship old wood to have new pieces shaped and built a simple pantograph for routing. I can use it for all string instrument builds, handles for fly rods and all matter of gun stocks, forepieces, molds, etc etc etc.


One of the best cheap investments I've made for my little shop.
I have a double barrel black powder shotgun and a 50 cal blackpowder rifle that I bought as kits and it took many weeks to get each of them to a good fit. This one will get a hand rubbed tru-oil finish and a coat of wax. Never really now how many coats as that depends on each piece of wood.
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  #20  
Old 04-16-2018, 12:43 PM
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Chris, now that this thread has meandered along for a couple of weeks, I'd like to satisfy my curiosity: is there any reason in particular that you chose to place it in Mechanical & Electrical instead of Firearms?
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