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  #21  
Old 09-02-2022, 10:12 AM
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Originally Posted by LKeithR View Post
Yeah, it doesn't matter how good your process is; if the guy(s) performing the work doesn't care about the outcome you can still have issues. A guy who cares and puts real effort into a project can make something out of a bad process--doesn't necessarily work the other way around, though...

Glad to hear you chime in Keith!


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  #22  
Old 09-03-2022, 02:33 PM
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I agree with the grouting.

Modern day treated wood is corrosive, so only use it if you are able to use appropriately treated bolts and steel. That is why when you go to buy "deck screws" they are all triple coated and cost $27 a pound. You might get away with galvanized bolts, but you still have to figure out how to protect your base plate.
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  #23  
Old 09-04-2022, 06:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Matt Shade View Post
I agree with the grouting.

Modern day treated wood is corrosive, so only use it if you are able to use appropriately treated bolts and steel. That is why when you go to buy "deck screws" they are all triple coated and cost $27 a pound. You might get away with galvanized bolts, but you still have to figure out how to protect your base plate.
This thread continues to enlighten me. Thank you all.

A bit of background for anyone interested:

I began building this barn after I finalized my drawing three years. ago. Because of the recent government shutdown I had time to reconsider.

My original plan was to build a standard 2x8 on 16”center stud wall on top of the existing 4 feet high block wall. This wall was to support rather large steel beams. I intended to add extra 2x8 studs directly under the beams for added support.

Although this would have worked well I did not like the fact that even a small to medium fire could allow a beam or two to let-go. Having a car or two crash down on the shop floor below would greatly increase the disastrous affect of a fire. I wanted the beams supported by steel columns on the concrete wall.
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  #24  
Old 09-04-2022, 08:27 PM
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Originally Posted by threepiece View Post
This thread continues to enlighten me. Thank you all.

A bit of background for anyone interested:

I began building this barn after I finalized my drawing three years. ago. Because of the recent government shutdown I had time to reconsider.

My original plan was to build a standard 2x8 on 16”center stud wall on top of the existing 4 feet high block wall. This wall was to support rather large steel beams. I intended to add extra 2x8 studs directly under the beams for added support.

Although this would have worked well I did not like the fact that even a small to medium fire could allow a beam or two to let-go. Having a car or two crash down on the shop floor below would greatly increase the disastrous affect of a fire. I wanted the beams supported by steel columns on the concrete wall.

I can’t ever recall when I was in steel construction / framing houses, would we ever had allowed a steel beam to be supported by wood. If the print called out steel for support, it had to be supported by steel or concrete. Or steel posts all the way to concrete foundations.

Now, that is not to say that I personally build something for my self that way, but wouldn’t want the liability for telling some one else that it’s OK.

Just for your info.


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  #25  
Old 09-05-2022, 10:53 PM
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I can’t ever recall when I was in steel construction / framing houses, would we ever had allowed a steel beam to be supported by wood.
How about supported by air? As seen on FBM...
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  #26  
Old 09-06-2022, 04:36 AM
threepiece threepiece is offline
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At this point I am strongly favoring 1.5” of plywood under a 1” steel plate.

I really need continuous wood on top of the block to fasted the siding. The wood will be four feet above ground and if done right there will be no chance of intruding water. Moreover, I plan on a full awning on front and full length addition on rear. This will place the columns interior of the barn.

There is a significant amount of vertical and horizontal rebar in the wall. I am not fond of drilling into it.

Two pieces of 3/4” plywood glued together and sealed from moisture on the bottom. A 1” steel plate on top. This assembly will be 36” long and 8” wide.

Currently there are cast in anchor bolts every 32” along the entire wall. Two holes 32” apart will allow me to secure the adapter anywhere on the wall. I can then drill and tap the two 5/8”-11 holes where needed for securing the column. Eight adapters are needed.
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  #27  
Old 09-06-2022, 02:11 PM
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I design this stuff for a living - that being said you are free to do what you want. My opinion - DO NOT USE WOOD, there are many reasons that is a bad idea. Do exactly as toprecycler said with the following additions:

Use 1 1/2" for grout thickness, 1" is acceptable, but 1.5 or more is easier in the off chance you need to level the column after setting it.

Use leveling nuts or if you really want jack bolts. They are the easiest method, in my opinion leveling shims suck.

use 3/4" epoxy anchors or cast in place anchors and 1 1/16 holes in your base plate. Use a 1/4x2x2 plate washer on top of the base plate.

I would need to know more about the building to speak to the size of your base plate, but off the cuff, there is no need to make the plate as big as you are intending - it doesn't help like you think it will. With a lever as long and stiff as you are likely using the plate bends quite easily. I would guess you are probably looking at a 3/4" plate 7ish by 10ish inches. keep at least 1 1/2" between center of hole and edge of plate, preferably 2 inches.
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  #28  
Old 09-06-2022, 04:05 PM
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Originally Posted by JBFab View Post
I design this stuff for a living - that being said you are free to do what you want. My opinion - DO NOT USE WOOD, there are many reasons that is a bad idea. Do exactly as toprecycler said with the following additions:

Use 1 1/2" for grout thickness, 1" is acceptable, but 1.5 or more is easier in the off chance you need to level the column after setting it.

Use leveling nuts or if you really want jack bolts. They are the easiest method, in my opinion leveling shims suck.

use 3/4" epoxy anchors or cast in place anchors and 1 1/16 holes in your base plate. Use a 1/4x2x2 plate washer on top of the base plate.

I would need to know more about the building to speak to the size of your base plate, but off the cuff, there is no need to make the plate as big as you are intending - it doesn't help like you think it will. With a lever as long and stiff as you are likely using the plate bends quite easily. I would guess you are probably looking at a 3/4" plate 7ish by 10ish inches. keep at least 1 1/2" between center of hole and edge of plate, preferably 2 inches.
Listen to Jason.
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  #29  
Old 09-06-2022, 04:35 PM
Lew Hartswick Lew Hartswick is offline
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:-) OK If your mind is already made up and are just looking for someone to agree, after one does it's best to stop reading answers because a lot are going to say it's a bad idea. :-) Where is DD ? Is that a close approximation. :-)
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  #30  
Old 09-11-2022, 06:15 PM
threepiece threepiece is offline
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Originally Posted by Shade Tree Welder View Post
Listen to Jason.
Well I would if this was new construction. I am getting the impression that he doesn’t understand what I am dealing with.

Because of the abundance of rebar inside the wall I am very reluctant to drill into it. Installing new anchors while I already have them cast in at 32” pitch seems foolish to me.

The extra long base plate is to reach two anchor bolts, not to spread the load over such a long distance. This seem like a better idea than attaching the plate with only one bolt or drilling for another anchor.

I am still not convinced that wood is a bad idea. The previous design was an entirely wood wall. I know wood is susceptible to rot and insects but I think both are avoidable. Is there something I may be overlooking here?
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