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  #11  
Old 07-15-2019, 09:02 AM
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Originally Posted by MetalWolf View Post

I've got some that I use to cut keyways but, But all are too wide or too shallow in-depth for the slit.
I have a thin 3" slitting saw but don't have an Arbor for it... and have never the time to sit there and make one...but don't have time to order one either...



Yep, I figured the slit is going to be the challenging part of them for sure...
So having no slitting saw, I'm going to have to ("wingnut it" The Ole Scratch my head and butt a few times I'm sure trying different things) And see what works the best...
First off, it's aluminum. A table saw with carbide teeth has a 1/8" cut. Slot it with that. Also you can use wood router bits on aluminum they are cheaper than busting cutters.
Second, nothing here is precision, so as long as the angle is close enough to function, you are good to go.
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  #12  
Old 07-15-2019, 04:54 PM
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Well here is a pic of the rough-in using two flute EM's climb milling
It would not cut for shit other than climb milling and I used crap EM cutters because the first brand new one snapped as it touched the material then a second and a third all-new EM's...

So I went to the old and used but good enough EM's for roughing-in.
being I was just roughing-in the pieces anyway... didn't figure it really matter.

I think this machine I have is a total POS, I don't like it. never had this issue on others I've used.

Anyway it cost a fortune with this machine in EM's
I have some of the corn cob EM's I was going to use but don't have enough flood coolant and don't want to screw up any more new EM's either

So the next round I'll do the slits with the table as Gerry suggested I had forgotten about using the table saw. I'll use an 80 tooth carbide blade that will cut it like butter... then I mill of the excess material...

Hell, he can't be picky considering I'm taking time out to help him get his shit in order... Right!

I don't think I'm going to do any finish cuts on these they will work better than the originals and have a bit more meat to them anyway... besides once they are installed you can see them any how.

Although I did not notice them being as rough as they came out until I have seen the pics... yep my eyes are getting bad.

I guess even though they are just roughed-in they should not be so rough even for old kind of worn EM's and that's with taking very small amounts of material off at a time no bit bites so something is foul with this ill drill...

Anyway, I'm going to go some other routes as suggested to finish these out.
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  #13  
Old 07-15-2019, 05:04 PM
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Were you using any coolant or lubricant? WD-40 would work to help keep the chips from sticking to the EM. Ron would probably say that might be the only thing that WD-40 is good for.


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  #14  
Old 07-15-2019, 05:09 PM
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Originally Posted by toprecycler View Post
Were you using any coolant or lubricant? WD-40 would work to help keep the chips from sticking to the EM. Ron would probably say that might be the only thing that WD-40 is good for.


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Yep was using WD-40 for cutting, I buy it by the gallon can... much cheaper than the spray cans. I just use it in a common spray bottle...
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  #15  
Old 07-15-2019, 06:53 PM
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They look fine to me. There is a time and place for precision work and finish. This is not one of them, especially when working for free.

The only way they will be seen is if his tool truck gets hit by a train and tears the boxes apart.
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  #16  
Old 07-15-2019, 08:57 PM
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They look fine to me. There is a time and place for precision work and finish. This is not one of them, especially when working for free.

The only way they will be seen is if his tool truck gets hit by a train and tears the boxes apart.
LOL! your no doubt right. but even then, they prolly wouldn't be noticeable among all the rest of the mess in it. It already looks like a train wreck... sad for A 2016, just sad I tell ya
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  #17  
Old 07-16-2019, 02:50 AM
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Ok so I tried again but this time I used the corncob EM's for taking off material
using a little WD-40 and air mister without the mist... then came back and deburred it with a file and a tiny bit of shaping it works smooth and as it should.

These will be bulletproof compared to the CS! pot metal crap the drawers came with, So I hope he doesn't lose the keys these aren't going to bend and break as easy as the factory ones.

Here are some pics of it now I have 8 made but got tired so will do a few more tomorrow or the next day just depends on how I feel...
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  #18  
Old 07-16-2019, 04:27 AM
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Originally Posted by MetalWolf View Post
It would not cut for shit other than climb milling and I used crap EM cutters because the first brand new one snapped as it touched the material then a second and a third all-new EM's...


Unless there is something very wrong with the mill or you are NOT holding the part very well the next thing that would break a new EM would be not enough primary clearance angle ground on the EM. assuming you did not climb mill with a new EM.

Long time ago ran into some end mills that were spun ground for size and no back relief angle. that was a real joke, seemed they were more upset at me that I brought it to there attention. about 20 new carbide EM's all spun ground.

check your new end mills primary relief angle.
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  #19  
Old 07-16-2019, 12:10 PM
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Originally Posted by MetalWolf View Post
...because the first brand new one snapped as it touched the material then a second and a third all-new EM's...
I can't remember the last time I actually broke an endmill. I've buggered some up because I tried to run them too hard in tough material but breakage just isn't an issue.

Quote:
...I think this machine I have is a total POS, I don't like it. never had this issue on others I've used...
Machine rigidity is a huge plus when it comes to running endmills; sounds like yours is like a wet noodle. What machine are you using?

Quote:
...I have some of the corn cob EM's I was going to use but don't have enough flood coolant and don't want to screw up any more new EM's either...
You don't have to run roughing cutters fast for them to work well. In aluminum if you plunge them in full depth and full width and run them at 250-300 rpm you can walk through a lot of material in a hurry. Flood or mist coolant is ideal but a little oil daubed on with a brush works OK too. Corncobs leave a texture on the surface so a little re-cutting of chips doesn't really hurt anything. Where the flood or mist is really needed is when you're making fine finish cuts with a conventional endmill...

Quote:
...I don't think I'm going to do any finish cuts on these they will work better than the originals and have a bit more meat to them anyway... besides once they are installed you can see them any how...
I do lots of jobs where all I use is a roughing endmill--things where the finish isn't important and you just need clearance for other parts. Much faster than messing around with a second cut. If I need a fine finish or tight fits I'll set the job up to leave .015"-.020" for a finish cut and then use a plain endmill to climb cut at high speed...
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  #20  
Old 07-16-2019, 02:09 PM
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Originally Posted by LKeithR View Post
I can't remember the last time I actually broke an endmill. I've buggered some up because I tried to run them too hard in tough material but breakage just isn't an issue.



Machine rigidity is a huge plus when it comes to running endmills; sounds like yours is like a wet noodle. What machine are you using?



You don't have to run roughing cutters fast for them to work well. In aluminum if you plunge them in full depth and full width and run them at 250-300 rpm you can walk through a lot of material in a hurry. Flood or mist coolant is ideal but a little oil daubed on with a brush works OK too. Corncobs leave a texture on the surface so a little re-cutting of chips doesn't really hurt anything. Where the flood or mist is really needed is when you're making fine finish cuts with a conventional endmill...



I do lots of jobs where all I use is a roughing endmill--things where the finish isn't important and you just need clearance for other parts. Much faster than messing around with a second cut. If I need a fine finish or tight fits I'll set the job up to leave .015"-.020" for a finish cut and then use a plain endmill to climb cut at high speed...
The machine I have or am using is a mill drill roungfu 30 I believe is what it is called I found two issues with it one being my son loosened the head and screwed with the vise I mean it never worked so bad when I first got it but that dam boy can't leave a dang thing alone

I spent 3 hours getting it back to where I could mill with it this morning
I just don't understand when someone tells someone not to screw with crap why on earth do they have to do it anyway...

but as of the moment I have it working ok not super great but it could use a Lil more fine-tuning and it could be a little better... I know it's best it will ever do is mostly roughing in stuff it will never be a tolerance machine.

when I got this machine it was dam near new but the gentleman passed away and it sat there and rusted up still had shipping grease on some places he never got cleaned off but I think the rust and time sitting did not do it any good prolly more harm than anything...
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