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  #21  
Old 02-02-2019, 08:05 PM
Spencer Spencer is offline
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The cylinder is supposed to have 11" of stroke. I've very happy that it appears the cylinder is mounted on bearing plates and is designed to travel the full width of the press, from one side to the other or centered anywhere in between.
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  #22  
Old 02-02-2019, 08:08 PM
Spencer Spencer is offline
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Safety first!

This press has obviously been neglected, but I hope to bring it back to at least some of its original glory with a little TLC.
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  #23  
Old 02-02-2019, 08:30 PM
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milomilo milomilo is offline
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Just out of curiosity, what kind of work do you plan to use the press for?
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  #24  
Old 02-02-2019, 08:33 PM
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Whitetrash Whitetrash is offline
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That is an awesome press I have needed one that big a few times over the years. The only caveat I will throw out is a powered press can get you in trouble sometimes cause you can pour on the pressure too quick. There are situations where loading an assembly up till shit seems ready to grunt spraying it down with penetrating oil walking away and chilling until you hear a pop is better than making shrapnel. We had an old blanket for really dicey shit wrap it up and pour on the pressure while standing around the side of the press frame don't stand directly in front or back of it.
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  #25  
Old 02-02-2019, 09:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Whitetrash View Post
That is an awesome press I have needed one that big a few times over the years. The only caveat I will throw out is a powered press can get you in trouble sometimes cause you can pour on the pressure too quick. There are situations where loading an assembly up till shit seems ready to grunt spraying it down with penetrating oil walking away and chilling until you hear a pop is better than making shrapnel. We had an old blanket for really dicey shit wrap it up and pour on the pressure while standing around the side of the press frame don't stand directly in front or back of it.
Scatter blanket comes to mind
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  #26  
Old 02-02-2019, 09:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Whitetrash View Post
That is an awesome press I have needed one that big a few times over the years. The only caveat I will throw out is a powered press can get you in trouble sometimes cause you can pour on the pressure too quick. There are situations where loading an assembly up till shit seems ready to grunt spraying it down with penetrating oil walking away and chilling until you hear a pop is better than making shrapnel. We had an old blanket for really dicey shit wrap it up and pour on the pressure while standing around the side of the press frame don't stand directly in front or back of it.
I have a 20T air over hydraulic and even when I stand to the side when doing a real hard press, it sometimes makes that loud pop and the floor in my storage van jumps. Still scares the crap outta me every time.
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  #27  
Old 02-02-2019, 09:16 PM
Spencer Spencer is offline
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Originally Posted by milomilo View Post
Just out of curiosity, what kind of work do you plan to use the press for?
Its first uses will be straightening things instead of bending them on purpose.

I use my forks on my tractor to take out stumps and that bends up the front of the forks making them look like clown shoes.

I've also got a rear blade for my tractor that got bent very badly when I had it hooked up to my front end loader using a "Switch-Hitch". I used to do that to push back the tops of my snow piles when they got higher than I could reach with my bucket alone. The geometry of having the blade on front applied a lot more leverage to it than it normally saw and twisted it pretty bad.

Once I get familiar with the press and done messing around trying to straighten some things out I plan on using it for making various brackets and the normal automotive uses of pushing out hub bearings, etc.

This will undoubtedly be overkill for most of my needs, but so far I've never regretted going too big. I've certainly regretted going too small or too cheap wishing I had, or actually buying something better.
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  #28  
Old 02-02-2019, 09:16 PM
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Nice press. That nick in the shaft should not bother the actual press too much. The worse that will do is leak a little oil as you raise the ram. It would leak a lot more if you actually was using the press to pull something apart, and it would leak as it goes past the seals. But since it only need to hold while raising the ram, you should be able to get by.

Now, the piston seals on the opposite end of the rod need to be good, along with no scratches in the barrel bore, for the press to press correctly with no leaks.

I work as a machinist in a Hydraulic repair shop, so making a threaded collar can be done. Like others have mentioned, it might be best to make an adapter that has a hole with a set screw to hold various other tools for you, for ease and quicker changes. You just need to make sure that you do not exceed the ratings of smaller tooling if you use it though.

Does it gave a pressure gauge? That can help you know the tonnage you are using.

If you find you need some help, I might be able to help. If you can’t find a local hydraulic shop if needed, my company has a salesman on the road that picks up cylinders all over Mi. He might be in your area sometime.


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  #29  
Old 02-02-2019, 09:33 PM
Spencer Spencer is offline
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Originally Posted by toprecycler View Post
Nice press. That nick in the shaft should not bother the actual press too much. The worse that will do is leak a little oil as you raise the ram. It would leak a lot more if you actually was using the press to pull something apart, and it would leak as it goes past the seals. But since it only need to hold while raising the ram, you should be able to get by.

Now, the piston seals on the opposite end of the rod need to be good, along with no scratches in the barrel bore, for the press to press correctly with no leaks.

I work as a machinist in a Hydraulic repair shop, so making a threaded collar can be done. Like others have mentioned, it might be best to make an adapter that has a hole with a set screw to hold various other tools for you, for ease and quicker changes. You just need to make sure that you do not exceed the ratings of smaller tooling if you use it though.

Does it gave a pressure gauge? That can help you know the tonnage you are using.

If you find you need some help, I might be able to help. If you can’t find a local hydraulic shop if needed, my company has a salesman on the road that picks up cylinders all over Mi. He might be in your area sometime.


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I do quite a bit of GC work for banks around the State and I get up to Petoskey a few times a year. It is usually when the weather is crappy, like when I was up there finishing up a project in November.

Normally fate would have had me up there during this Polar Vortex, but low and behold I was mainly working around Detroit.

I will be up in Petoskey in a few weeks though, so it may be a good idea to just bring the whole cylinder up to you to get checked out.

As I'm just scoping the project that week (likely the week of February 18th) I won't actually be back up their for construction until probably late March or sometime in April to do the work.

Although I have no real pressing (no pun intended) needs to use this press at the moment, I'd rather not be without the cylinder for 6-8 weeks, so maybe I could meet up with your salesman once you were done with it to pick it up from him.

He and I probably cross paths all the time, as I have projects going in Detroit, Flint, Port Huron, Lansing, Grand Rapids, etc.
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  #30  
Old 02-02-2019, 09:44 PM
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My shop is in Alanson, 8 miles north of Petoskey. We probably are not the cheapest out there, but we stand behind our work and do not like taking shortcuts.


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