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  #11  
Old 10-20-2009, 11:09 AM
Bolt Bolt is offline
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Use a 3/4 main line and 1/2 inch drops, then you can use your 1/2 inch ball valves you already have. My vote is for copper, and Dan is correct, the main tank bushings are VERY hard to remove, last one I had to weld a 3/4 nipple into the bushing, heat it up, and put a large cheater on the 3/4 nipple. I won.
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  #12  
Old 10-20-2009, 10:46 PM
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Ggg Ggg is offline
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Thanks for all the input. If I decide to use copper which type K, L, M?
Are there any possible issues with copper and temperature extremes?
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  #13  
Old 10-20-2009, 11:04 PM
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None properly soldered copper pipe and joints have tremendous safety factors when compared with other choices.

The only conciderations K L M wise are asthetics and cost
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  #14  
Old 10-20-2009, 11:43 PM
Bolt Bolt is offline
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I use the blue one, I think that's type L. The middle grade.

Some will tell you to braze the joints. I solder them, and you can use a lead based solder on air lines. But someone will be along here to tell you the optimum solder type to use for air lines.
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  #15  
Old 10-21-2009, 07:31 AM
chevyoneton chevyoneton is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bolt View Post
But someone will be along here to tell you the optimum solder type to use for air lines.
I would use what ever lead piece of roll of solder I had kicking around in the bottom of the tool box. Also, I agree the 3/4 to 1/2 would be better but find it hard to believe a solo shop running what you describe would be hampered by running all 1/2" pipe. It will flow a lot more air then any hose and 1/4" & 3/8" is all the hose I have ever used runnig a lot of stuff some distance. Disclamier: I am no expert but they are building a Holiday Inn Express down the street from me.
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  #16  
Old 10-21-2009, 08:43 AM
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Lu47Dan Lu47Dan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pat View Post
Dan,

Thank you very much for the info. I only run about 140 psi, and was thinking about putting 2 drops in the shop, and adding another connection outside the shop by the garage door so I can connect a hose for an outside air supply. I will basically use the air for a 1/2" impact, air ratchets, airing up tires, and the plasma cutter. Copper it will be.........now, I am going to head over to Menard's later this afternoon and get what I need to do the project today instead of waiting. I do not know what price difference there will be in the copper pipe sizes, but would half inch be too small to consider, or should I just get the 3/4". If it would work properly for my use, I would like to get the 1/2" because I have a box full of 1/2" ball valves. I know I can get adapters to use the ball valves on the 3/4", but I think just having the 1/2" ball valves would restrict the air flow to what 1/2" pipe would be. So if 1/2" will not be enough, I will just get the 3/4" and some new 3/4" ball valves......thanks again.
Pat , this might be a little late to help you , but 3/4 mains are the smallest I would run on any sized system , with 1/2" drops . The new shop will have 1" mains and several 3/4" drops to handle large air demands like sandblast cabinets and my one inch impact that a friend has right now . The 3/4" main needs to be pitched to the far end so if any condensate builds up in it it can be removed at a drip leg .
Place a shutoff valve at the tank and a shutoff valve on the drop going to the air connection outside your shop . I installed a connector outside my shop door and wish I had done it years ago .
Ggg , I tend to use K copper for airlines , as that is what the place I get most of my copper from has on hand when I buy it , it also has the heaviest wall thickness , but L is the most common in the box stores .

Buy a roll of plumbers sand cloth , you will find many other uses for it , it won't go to waste . Uses self tinning flux , as it is better suited to airline use .
Clean the tube and the fitting sockets well , apply the flux sparingly , a thin coat of flux works better than a thick coat . When the solder quits flowing into the joint and a drip forms , stop heating and wipe the joint with a clean cotton rag to remove the excess solder from the joint .

Wear safety glasses , gloves and a long sleeve shirt or welding jacket to protect yourself , I have a few scars from solder dripping onto me .
Dan
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  #17  
Old 10-24-2009, 08:47 PM
Charles (in GA) Charles (in GA) is offline
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For information on copper tube and its specs, different solders and brazing methods and joint strengths, and lots of other useful information, you should consult the Copper Tube Handbook, published by the Copper Development Association.

http://www.copper.org/publications/p...e_handbook.pdf

On pages 25 and 26 you will find the tables for K L and M pipe, you will see that K being the heaviest pipe is severe overkill, and M being the lightest is still more than enough.

On page 28 you will find that 50-50 tin-lead solder is not sufficient strength to give you a safety margin, and that 95-5 solder is much more suited to what you are doing.

Charles
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  #18  
Old 10-24-2009, 08:53 PM
Charles (in GA) Charles (in GA) is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim-TX View Post
1" schedule 40 PVC will handle plenty of air, will not rust out, is cheap, and easy to plumb. I know a guy that has 2 shops (one business and one hobby) plumbed with PVC and he has no problems. He runs a sandblaster, sodablaster and other air tools.
I noticed how politely everyone ignored Jim's rather dangerous suggestion of using PVC. It certainly can cause some arguments.

This information has been out for over 20 years now.

http://www.osha.gov/dts/hib/hib_data/hib19880520.html

There is a reason why OSHA will cite a business it finds using PVC, and it isn't because uncle sam needs money either.

I know of one board where the moderators simply delete any post that suggests PVC, they will not allow the arguments to begin. Copper is a very good choice.

Charles
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  #19  
Old 11-11-2009, 01:44 AM
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I just picked up the copper pipe, 1" type L (USA) it was only about $1 more/10' length than galv. I am also using the 1" for the drops. It will neck down at the quick couplers only.
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  #20  
Old 11-11-2009, 05:48 AM
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Is this a special ABS? Most of what I have seen is inferior to the PVC.
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