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Old 12-11-2006, 10:30 AM
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Default More weekend adventures with the " W " material

This is how I spent the first "non racing" weekend i've had in a while. It's 13 ft X 16 ft X 8'6" high and will be used as a machine shop and an engine assembly "clean room". I had planned to build steel trusses for the lid, but the cost of steel and the lack of availible scrap has forced me to set up for fabricated wood I joist's, I can build them for less than a third of the cost of TBI's. Has anybody built engineered wood beams at home? RED
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A 160 MPH drive, down a 2 lane blacktop, all by yourself, is NOT anti-social behaviour... I drag race because football, baseball, and golf only need ONE ball. Paul.


What I really need to know is, WHEN DOES THE SHOOTING START?
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Old 12-11-2006, 10:50 AM
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Why not just 2x8's and a flat ceiling?

I just saw this on the Miller board...

Race parts for sale
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Old 12-11-2006, 12:16 PM
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The lid is going to connect to the loft and give me an extra 250 sq ft of storage space, I joist is much more rigid, and lighter than dimentional lumber of the same chord, so the live load and dead load numbers are much higher and I can cram more "stuff" up there... I'm still undecided on the right glue though, all the sites I cruised consider that propriatary information and won't give it up.
I saw that stuff on racejunk and I'll most likely end up with some of the BBC stuff, thanks for the tip. RED
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A 160 MPH drive, down a 2 lane blacktop, all by yourself, is NOT anti-social behaviour... I drag race because football, baseball, and golf only need ONE ball. Paul.


What I really need to know is, WHEN DOES THE SHOOTING START?
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Old 12-11-2006, 03:50 PM
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I've seen several references to resorcinol or phenol-resorcinol waterproof glue, same as in boatbuilding. DAP Weldwood resorcinol glue is about $20 a pint.

http://www.dap.com/product_details.aspx?product_id=43

tech doc: http://www.dap.com/docs/tech/00030205.pdf (note required curing temp and wood moisture level)
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Old 12-11-2006, 03:52 PM
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TGI's are pretty cheap for that span and number. I woudl jsut buy them and you will know what you have.
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Old 12-31-2006, 09:57 AM
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I popped the first 2 I joists out of the jig today, 16 feet long 7 inch chord, 2 X 3 rails and 1/2 inch plywood spacers. I stood one on edge, raised it off the floor on 2 X 4's at each end, balanced my 230 lb. frame on top, at the center. Total deflection < 5/16". ( thankfully, no pic's of my circus act)
Looks like the final cost is gonna be around $7.80 PER JOIST (less labor, of course, we all work for free on our own stuff, LOL) Pretty good, considering the best price quote I had was $1.88/foot, (my OTD price thru Lowe's) 2 down, 11 to go, 24 hour dry time, 2 a day, ought to be hangin' em next weekend... RED
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A 160 MPH drive, down a 2 lane blacktop, all by yourself, is NOT anti-social behaviour... I drag race because football, baseball, and golf only need ONE ball. Paul.


What I really need to know is, WHEN DOES THE SHOOTING START?
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Old 12-31-2006, 11:29 AM
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Nice work, Red. Hard to beat a mortise & tenon (M&T) joint for large glue contact area.

The ultimate strength of any woodworking joint depends on how precisely the joint is constructed & the type of glue used. In a perfect joint, the glue layer is less than the thickness of a sheet of notebook paper, or about .003" on all three sides of the tenon.

All premium woodworking glues are far stronger than the wood ... the wood will always fail before the glue. Probably the most popular yellow aliphatic glue is Franklin’s Titebond (I buy a gallon at a time) with a strength around 3600 psi tensile. This strength is in a long-grain-to-long-grain joint, the type used to glue boards together for a tabletop.

Your joint is much different from a tabletop -- you do have long grain contact on both sides of the tenon, but the end of the tenon is (duh) end grain. This is where polyurethanes far outperform yellow aliphatic glues. Most every manufacturer makes a poly glue, the most popular being Gorilla Glue. http://www.gorillaglue.com/home.htm

If you choose poly glue, be sure to read the application instructions, it is far different from any other glue. Be sure to wear latex or nitrile gloves, as it takes nearly a week to get this stuff off your hands
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Old 12-31-2006, 12:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RED caddy
( thankfully, no pic's of my circus act)
Oh pretty please! I love the circus.



(but clowns are a little scary! )
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  #9  
Old 12-31-2006, 12:31 PM
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Thanks Barry, I used Titebond 2 aliphatic, great shear strength and a little longer "working time". The rail end (center) joint is joined with the same glue, but uses a biscut for alignment and a spline joint cut in the ply spacers, with a 5/8ths ply fish plate 10" X 4 1/2" glued and screwed to each side of the splice add a little rigidity and provide a good nailing point for the cross ties. I'm pretty confident that the "lid" will hold more weight than my lazy butt will ever carry up there, LOL. RED
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A 160 MPH drive, down a 2 lane blacktop, all by yourself, is NOT anti-social behaviour... I drag race because football, baseball, and golf only need ONE ball. Paul.


What I really need to know is, WHEN DOES THE SHOOTING START?
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