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  #11  
Old 03-24-2021, 04:53 PM
John in WI John in WI is offline
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Originally Posted by camdigger View Post
If the material is truly a low carbon steel, I wouldn't bother with too much temperature control.

Just to make the welding easier, maybe 200-300 F preheat. 700 F maximum inter pass, and slow post cooling by burying in sand, kitty litter, or insulating blanket wrap.

I'd also think about skinning the work surface with a higher carbon steel to resist wear.

YMMV, my 0.02$ CDN.
That was the plan in phase 2--work out the hard facing material. I'm reading some technical documents from Lincoln. They have one that is rated for severe impact. It claims unlimited passes. I also was reading about some manganese rod that is work-hardenable. That would be nice, because i could weld it, then machine/grind it soft, and beat the S(#*@Q out of it with a hammer to harden it. The Lincoln document is pretty good. I'm a little afraid to see what these things cost. https://www.lincolnelectric.com/asse...ture/C7710.pdf
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  #12  
Old 03-24-2021, 08:10 PM
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Originally Posted by John in WI View Post
Hello folks,
First post here. Hoping to learn some things before starting a project.

I have some heavy "mystery metal" that I believe is some kind of low-carbon structural material. One piece is 3"x4", and about 2' long. To this I wanted to weld some more 3" thick material. I'm hoping to fabricate a post anvil for bladesmithing.

I joined a local maker's space that has a decent welding shop. I was probably going to go with SMAW (most familiar with it). I would use a band saw to deeply bevel the joints (especially on top where the impact would happen).

I know low-carbon is more forgiving with respect to weld cracking, but still, this thing will be built to literally take a beating.

My question is about pre and post heating (and interweld temperature). I was planning to use DC straight polarity (maximum penetration). Maybe using 6010 electrodes.

How hot should I get the pieces prior to welding? Is there a limit as to how hot I can get? Since I would be laying down numerous beads, the piece would get much hotter during the course or welding.

Finally, what about post-weld heating. Would it be enough to just let it air cool? Bury it in a bucket of perlite or vermiculite to slow the cooling down?

Thanks for any info. I'm asking about the actual fabrication of the piece. I'll get to the hardfacing part later.
Reverse polarity (electrode positive) is the correct polarity for 7018. I wouldn't bother with the 6010 at all, just increase your bevel size by another 1/8". For something you're going to beat on, I wouldn't go less than 1/2" bevels.
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  #13  
Old 03-25-2021, 11:15 AM
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If it's for blacksmithing ....why aren't you forge welding it ?
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  #14  
Old 03-25-2021, 11:20 AM
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Originally Posted by John in WI View Post
I was planning to use DC straight polarity (maximum penetration). Maybe using 6010 electrodes.
I am glad that Arizonian, pointed this out... WTF nobody else caught it?

Reverse -- Electrode Positive is the correct way.

You will get less penetration with straight polarity, and it's just fucking wrong
if you are going to stick weld it.

If you do run 7018, make sure it is dry, if it is not dry you could get hydrogen
cracking. But 601X rod will not have the hydrogen embrittlement problems.
Also if your base metal is low carbon steel and 601X rod will be stronger than
your parent metal so save some money and trouble and use the less
expensive rod.

And ignore Dougie, he is a bigger asshole than me.
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  #15  
Old 03-25-2021, 04:05 PM
John in WI John in WI is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arizonian View Post
Reverse polarity (electrode positive) is the correct polarity for 7018. I wouldn't bother with the 6010 at all, just increase your bevel size by another 1/8". For something you're going to beat on, I wouldn't go less than 1/2" bevels.
Yes, I was going to really give it a deep bevel. I thought probably 1 full inch on the top surface. I REALLY want that to act like one monolithic piece of steel. Then a good 1/2" the rest of the way around. I think I also have some 1x1/2" stock, I could even put a heavy steel brace, so the 3 pieces would also be joined through that. From what I was reading, to really get serious crack prevention, constraining the joint is required. It might be overkill here--but even if it isn't needed, it would add significant weight which is a good thing too.
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  #16  
Old 03-25-2021, 09:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John in WI View Post
Yes, I was going to really give it a deep bevel. I thought probably 1 full inch on the top surface. I REALLY want that to act like one monolithic piece of steel. Then a good 1/2" the rest of the way around. I think I also have some 1x1/2" stock, I could even put a heavy steel brace, so the 3 pieces would also be joined through that. From what I was reading, to really get serious crack prevention, constraining the joint is required. It might be overkill here--but even if it isn't needed, it would add significant weight which is a good thing too.
For exceptionally thick sections, I would consider a J bevel or a U groove. It saves removing and replacing a large volume of metal, yet still provides room for cleaning between passes and for relatively narrow weaved passes.
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  #17  
Old 03-26-2021, 09:53 AM
JBFab JBFab is offline
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Howdy neighbor, and welcome to the forum. You are on the right track with beveling the material. Pre-heat to 225°F keep interpass under 700°F, don't worry about post heat. Just don't quench it or otherwise accelerate cooling. I would recommend 7018 from a sealed container on DCEP. Skip the 6010 or 6011. Depending on how much area you have to surface I have some stoody hardfacing rod. I'd rather not give it all away, but I could spare a handful.
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  #18  
Old 03-30-2021, 04:56 PM
John in WI John in WI is offline
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Originally Posted by JBFab View Post
Howdy neighbor, and welcome to the forum. You are on the right track with beveling the material. Pre-heat to 225°F keep interpass under 700°F, don't worry about post heat. Just don't quench it or otherwise accelerate cooling. I would recommend 7018 from a sealed container on DCEP. Skip the 6010 or 6011. Depending on how much area you have to surface I have some stoody hardfacing rod. I'd rather not give it all away, but I could spare a handful.
Thanks for the info. I'm excited--I can get signed off for use of the tools on Friday morning, then want to hit it as hard as I have energy for. Just a little cutting and drilling to do first. I think I can do the bevels with a saw, which would save a lot of time. I might hit you up for some Stoody. Maybe we can reach an agreement. The face will be around 4x6" so I shouldn't need a ton of it.
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  #19  
Old 03-30-2021, 05:08 PM
JBFab JBFab is offline
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Sounds good!

Sent from my mobile device using ShopFloorTalk mobile app
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  #20  
Old 03-30-2021, 05:34 PM
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Howdy neighbor, and welcome to the forum.
OH gawd, I hope they don't start spooning...
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