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  #21  
Old 02-21-2019, 04:30 PM
Sarky13 Sarky13 is offline
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Originally Posted by cutter View Post
Sarky, your two threads are now merged.
Hint: please don't do that. It always results in someone notifying me, it creates a little extra work for me and I'm getting old and kinda grouchy.
Sorry about that. I posted in the fabrication forum 1st and had a bunch of views with No responses. I couldn't figure out how to move the thread. I shalln't do it again.
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  #22  
Old 02-21-2019, 09:16 PM
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  #23  
Old 02-21-2019, 10:16 PM
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The corners are kinda quiet and lonely now that Madam X isn't around.
And I miss Jef (LW)too.
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  #24  
Old 02-22-2019, 01:02 PM
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The corners are kinda quiet and lonely now that Madam X isn't around.
And I miss Jef (LW)too.
Didn't LW say that he had no internet at the farm?
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  #25  
Old 02-22-2019, 03:17 PM
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Didn't LW say that he had no internet at the farm?


I believe that is why we do not hear from him very much anymore. Hope all is going good with him. Would love to hear update on his house raising.


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  #26  
Old 02-22-2019, 05:07 PM
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midmosandblasting midmosandblasting is offline
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I wonder if a booster would get him enough cell service to use as a wifi hotspot .Randy any feeling on this ?
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  #27  
Old 03-16-2019, 12:34 PM
o7oBaseMetal o7oBaseMetal is offline
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I know I am a bit late on this but I do sanitary stainless for a living. In theory you don't have to scrap the tank but if you had to pay somebody to do it you are probably better off starting over. There are multiple issues with the job you displayed. Obviously the weld didn't have a proper back purge. Obviously the fitting should have been tacked up flush or a little under flush rather than extending into the tank. It would have been fully acceptable to weld the inside and outside separately if it wasn't fully penetrated.
The equipment the guy had isn't a good way to judge his skills. I have seen people get flown all over the country and earn a million dollars on a $400 esab 161 mini tig rig and I have seen people do it on $2000 Millers. Somebody who knows what they are doing could do it on pretty much anything that will hold a stable arc at 40-65 amps.
If you paid $200 for a few ferrules you got ripped off big time. I hope you at least got quality Alfa Laval fittings for that price and not the stuff Sanitube or Steel & O'Brien are passing off as fittings these days...
$200 to weld a few ferrules on is probably reasonable assuming that all he had to do was tack them on quickly and weld. I probably would have done it cheaper since you are a hobbyist and I don't need the money.
It might be something about Missouri in general though. A while back I worked on a new distillery in Iowa and the got quite a bit of equipment from a "professional" company out of St. Genevieve, MO. I spent a lot of time chopping their stuff apart and reworking it. You could tell they weren't familiar with the way the job is done. You could tell they were cutting their sanitary tubing with a chop saw and also not filing it because the cuts weren't square, the welds were loaded with skips and you would see the burr still on the inside of the weld seam from a chop saw cut... The stuff we didn't cut apart was probably acceptable for the alcohol industry but would have gotten them thrown off any dairy or food job I have ever seen.
If you can get a new keg cheap I would just do that. Anyone who knows what they are doing can put in the holes with a hole saw OR you could do it right and have the holes pulled so the keg warpage is limited and the weld is easier to inspect or even polish off.
I am in Wisconsin so I don't know how much I can really help you but if I were closer I would.

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  #28  
Old 03-16-2019, 02:49 PM
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LKeithR LKeithR is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by o7oBaseMetal View Post
...The equipment the guy had isn't a good way to judge his skills. I have seen people get flown all over the country and earn a million dollars on a $400 esab 161 mini tig rig and I have seen people do it on $2000 Millers. Somebody who knows what they are doing could do it on pretty much anything that will hold a stable arc at 40-65 amps...
Yeah, tig welding SS is about as easy as it gets. We've got a Dynasty 350 now but in the early years we welded SS with a simple 200 amp DC power supply and a scratch start tig setup.

Quote:
...The stuff we didn't cut apart was probably acceptable for the alcohol industry but would have gotten them thrown off any dairy or food job I have ever seen...
Yup. Dairy and meat are the most critical--not much wiggle room there--cleanliness was an absolute priority. Just watching the wash down procedure was tedious--bacteria will propagate in diary and meat products very quickly and from the tiniest speck of contamination.

On the other hand, we once did quite a bit of work in a large chocolate factory. It was pretty dirty--piles of chocolate dust everywhere--but the inspectors didn't seem to mind that much. Chocolate is oil based and doesn't attract bacteria much...
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  #29  
Old 03-16-2019, 03:12 PM
o7oBaseMetal o7oBaseMetal is offline
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I was in a chocolate factory out in New Hampshire a couple years ago. Pretty extensive on the jacketed piping. Probably the most I had ever seen in one place.
Quote:
Originally Posted by LKeithR View Post
Yeah, tig welding SS is about as easy as it gets. We've got a Dynasty 350 now but in the early years we welded SS with a simple 200 amp DC power supply and a scratch start tig setup.



Yup. Dairy and meat are the most critical--not much wiggle room there--cleanliness was an absolute priority. Just watching the wash down procedure was tedious--bacteria will propagate in diary and meat products very quickly and from the tiniest speck of contamination.

On the other hand, we once did quite a bit of work in a large chocolate factory. It was pretty dirty--piles of chocolate dust everywhere--but the inspectors didn't seem to mind that much. Chocolate is oil based and doesn't attract bacteria much...
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