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  #51  
Old 03-07-2016, 07:34 PM
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toprecycler toprecycler is offline
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Originally Posted by Matt G. View Post
Is it me or has my tensioner lever been modified? It swings over center too far instead of locking slightly over center. It appears a bunch of material has been ground away for some reason. Edit: After looking at 5 or 6 used ones on ebay, it appears mine must be modified. May as well get one of those on the way.
is the looks very important to you? If not, you could either weld the slot back up if you have the means to do this, or mix up some epoxy and fill in the groove some. Would get the lever to stop where it was designed to originally. Or just adjust the tensioner rod to correct length. Someone probably ground the groove deeper to make up for the belt getting old and slipping and getting just a little more adjustment.

Brian
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  #52  
Old 03-07-2016, 09:08 PM
Matt G. Matt G. is offline
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I can weld, but not cast iron. Or at least I've never tried. My first thought since I have nothing to lose by trying to save it is to drill a hole through it for a cross bolt to restore the appropriate amount of over-center. If I screw that up, it looks like used levers are pretty plentiful.

The tensioner bolt/clevis has been pretty extensively modified with some goofy brazed-together clevis on the countershaft end and a coupling nut for a turnbuckle. I am very tempted to make a new one with a proper turnbuckle that has LH threads on one end so that it can be adjusted more easily, but I may be overthinking this.

Before I go too far I should probably wire the motor back up and make sure it actually works
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  #53  
Old 03-07-2016, 10:11 PM
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terry lingle terry lingle is offline
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Yes a working motor is a good thing. Even better is a reversible working motor.
You could drill and tap straight into that grove and make an adjustable stop for the over travel.
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  #54  
Old 03-08-2016, 09:25 AM
jimkinney jimkinney is offline
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Originally Posted by Matt G. View Post
Before I drill holes in the tabletop for the lathe itself and the countershaft, does everything look right? How much space should there be between the motor and the lathe bed? It appears the previous owner added a bunch of length to the threaded adjuster for the countershaft/flat belt tension, which I'll want to remove.
Matt,

This is for a 10K, but it should be the same size.

You are a lot closer than I am with my 9A. It is still all apart in boxes in the garage, but I think I now have all of the parts after a few years of ebay and craigslist searching.

Jim
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  #55  
Old 03-08-2016, 11:02 AM
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That is a good drawing set Jim.
The set up is clearly written but you still need the belts you will be running to set the dimension shown as 15 3/4 correctly.
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  #56  
Old 03-08-2016, 01:59 PM
jimkinney jimkinney is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by terry lingle View Post
That is a good drawing set Jim.
The set up is clearly written but you still need the belts you will be running to set the dimension shown as 15 3/4 correctly.
That is true. I haven't decided on belts yet for mine, so I will have to take that into consideration also. It's a good starting point.

Jim
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  #57  
Old 03-08-2016, 03:36 PM
Matt G. Matt G. is offline
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Jim-

Thanks for the drawing. I found that one elsewhere but yours is a MUCH cleaner copy. Through trial and error I eventually figured it out and got the countershaft mounted. Belt appears to run true, but I can't tension it properly yet.

Terry-

I think that's the winning idea for fixing my tensioner handle. I think a 1/4" or 5/16" socket head capscrew will fit down in there.

I did a bunch of googling and found some posts on practicalmachinist that implied I could move the countershaft a bit closer to the lathe and use a shorter belt, so that's what I ended up doing. I bought a new serpentine belt for my S10 and cut the old one to use for the lathe; I think I ended up with a roughly 48" belt. I then spliced it with 30 lb test fishing line in accordance with the (leather) belt splicing instructions in SB bulletin No. 600 that I found online. Now for a slight pause to put the cabinet under the bench to get it off my floor, and then I'll continue cleaning and lubing the lathe and getting the motor wired. Maybe in a week or so I'll be able to power it up.

Anybody have a good lubrication chart for these I can hang on the wall next to the lathe? I bought the 4-piece oil kit I linked to on ebay awhile back, and while it's obvious where the spindle oil and way oil go, I'm not sure what the others should be used for yet...
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  #58  
Old 03-10-2016, 08:36 PM
Matt G. Matt G. is offline
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Well, now I wish I had tested the motor before mounting it

I wired up a switch and the motor, and it'll turn, but it buzzes continually and has no power. Doesn't seem to get up to rated RPM either. I may have to borrow the motor off of my stationary belt sander until I can find another one.
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  #59  
Old 03-10-2016, 09:24 PM
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Is this a sleeve bearing motor? To find out does it have the little oil cups on the motor, if so it may just need a few drops of oil in the oil cups or the centrifugal switch may be stuck in it.

When you shut off the motor does it spin down and click as it is winding down?

And you may want to go back and reread post 26 where Terry described the 4 lead motors may be 120 or 240. It may be wired 240 and not 120 causing it not to spin up.

Scott
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  #60  
Old 03-10-2016, 09:46 PM
Matt G. Matt G. is offline
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Scott-

Yes, it has the oil cups, and I put some of the Mobil SAE 10 oil for the lathe spindle bearings in them before I tried to power it up. Not sure if it clicks when I shut it down; I'll try that tomorrow. The tag on the motor implies it is 120V only.

I've got a couple of 1/3 hp motors around here for other things, and I may temporarily kludge one of those on here until I can get another functional 1/2 hp motor from my Dad's collection.
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