Shop Floor Talk  

Go Back   Shop Floor Talk > Welding and Metalworking Forums > Shop & Safety

SFT Search:   
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 11-08-2012, 03:40 PM
studacc studacc is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Sacramento
Posts: 4
Default Survey for welders and metalworkers

Hello everyone. I find it appropriate to post here since my post is related to safety. Admins, please forgive me if I may have violated a rule in any form but I just have survey questions on noise.

I am a student at Sacramento State University writing a research paper on Occupational Noise. I am trying to know if regardless of whether you are bothered by noise at your work, it may still affect your physical health in some manner. I'm sure a lot of you have personal experiences as welders and metal workers in your profession in regards to noise. Please kindly share.
I also understand this is a sensitive subject for some who despise HR for all its safety rules but I am not HR and just a student. I have five short questions and these are my questions:

please state your job as title: (E.g 'I am a welder')

1) How long have you been working in your line of work?
2) While working, do you have to shout to be heard by a coworker just 3 ft away from you or close to you?
3) Does occupational noise bother you?
4) Since you've started working, have you experienced any symptoms of hearing loss, like ringing in the ear, pain or been diagnosed with any sort of heart disease/hearing disorder by your physician?
5) At work, do you use any form of hearing protection when working to control noise?

Thank you very much for your response.

Last edited by studacc; 11-08-2012 at 06:03 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 11-08-2012, 05:17 PM
Zeke's Avatar
Zeke Zeke is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Long Beach CA
Posts: 200
Default

OK, I'll play. I'm a hobby welder, but my exposure to noise has been similar to shop welding. Over 60 (closer to 70) and have tinnitus plus hearing difficulties. I can hear things that others don't, but if there's a lot of background noise such as in a restaurant, I can't hear shit.

I used every manner of tool you can imagine doing carpentry and metal work. Some are very loud. I began to use hearing protection at about age 40, but not religiously. I wasn't aware of the tinnitus then.

Here's the thing: I think part of my problem has nothing to do with industrial noise. Use of headphones and listening to loud music as a young guy surely did damage. And, meds have contributed to the tinnitus as much as anything.

So, while you can protect your hearing in the weld shop, that iPod will get you. And, sooner of later you will be taking some meds. So many of them contribute to tinnitus that you may not escape if you work in a quiet environment and don't use earbuds or phones. Oh, and constant talking on the phone will get one ear.

Lastly, I raced karts for nearly 40 years. We didn't use ear protection back in the 50's and 60's and the helmets were paper thin.

To get down to brass tacks,
1) How long have you been working in your line of work? 50 years
2) While working, do you have to shout to be heard by a coworker just 3 ft away from you or close to you? Depends on the worker. I hear fine at 3 ft.
3) Does occupational noise bother you? Not really.
4) Since you've started working, have you experienced any symptoms of hearing loss, like ringing in the ear, pain or been diagnosed with any sort of hearing disorder/loss by your physician? Answered above.
5) At work, do you use any form of hearing protection when working to control noise? Almost always.

I don't know what you expect to achieve with those questions. I think you need a better set of questions to prove that it's a vocational liability to get hearing loss when there are so many outside factors. For instance, riding in an open car all day long will leave you with ringing ears. So if some guy who drives an open sports car to work every day and goes to a bar with loud music frequently blames his work for his hearing problems, is that fair to the employer?
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 11-08-2012, 05:20 PM
digr's Avatar
digr digr is offline
The Real Deal
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Duluth MN
Posts: 7,553
Default

What?????
__________________
Drawing by Smartdraw
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 11-08-2012, 05:35 PM
Norm W's Avatar
Norm W Norm W is offline
Elite Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Syracuse, NY
Posts: 2,673
Default

If someone listens to ear-buds, so loud that you can tell what they are listening to from across the room, is his/her employer responsible for their hearing loss? Too many variables, or not enough questions, to be a viable survey for work related hearing loss.
__________________
Make over, make do, or do without

Why do I have to press one for English when you're just gonna transfer me to someone I can't understand anyway?

Grant me the strength to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can & the friends to post my bail when I finally snap!
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 11-08-2012, 06:01 PM
studacc studacc is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Sacramento
Posts: 4
Default

I'm aiming to prove that regardless of whether a person is bothered by loud noise in a noisy environment, they can still experience fatigue or stress leading to other health problems. I'll edit my third question, thank you for reminding me Zeke.


If there is a negative threshold shift in your hearing since you've started working with your employer, then you're definitely suffering from occupational induced hearing loss. If loud music caused it while you were working but it was on your ipod, then I'm sure it wasn't occupationally induced, that one is self. Your employer's machines, environment are not the source.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 11-08-2012, 06:38 PM
Norm W's Avatar
Norm W Norm W is offline
Elite Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Syracuse, NY
Posts: 2,673
Default

Believe me, I'm not talking about Ipod use at work. I see teens, that haven't joined the work force yet, damaging their hearing everyday. By the time they do join the the work force, if they can find a job, they will have already damaged their hearing. Even with low sound levels, your premise will saddle the employer with the blame. Is that what you are trying to do? Are you looking for other miladies associated with high noise levels. I'm sorry if I'm misinterpreting the reason for your questions, but I've been 'round this barn before.

1) How long have you been working in your line of work?35 years teaching music. 40 years driving truck/mechanical work

2) While working, do you have to shout to be heard by a coworker just 3 ft away from you or close to you? No
3) Does occupational noise bother you? no
4) Since you've started working, have you experienced any symptoms of hearing loss, like ringing in the ear, pain or been diagnosed with any sort of heart disease/hearing disorder by your physician?high blood pressure from dealing with government stupidity
5) At work, do you use any form of hearing protection when working to control noise? Not if I want to hear anything, if driving I could get arrested for using any.
__________________
Make over, make do, or do without

Why do I have to press one for English when you're just gonna transfer me to someone I can't understand anyway?

Grant me the strength to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can & the friends to post my bail when I finally snap!
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 11-08-2012, 07:14 PM
studacc studacc is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Sacramento
Posts: 4
Default

thank you for your response Norm W.

In regards to your iPod statement, I get what you're saying. You're correct that most people do bring some form of hearing loss before they start their jobs. Usually, smart employers establish a baseline hearing threshold for every employee who will be working for them so they can know how good their hearing was before they started working and if they file lawsuits, they will compare new hearing threshold with baseline.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 11-08-2012, 08:02 PM
rustythe4x4's Avatar
rustythe4x4 rustythe4x4 is offline
Elite Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Saskatchewan
Posts: 1,508
Default

I have been employed by a few employers that take baseline hearing tests, and compare them later in life if there is a dispute over hearing loss. It still doesnt tell you ANYTHING.
At my current place of emplyment, I run a machine with near open exhaust from a duetz 3 cyl. diesel. Its loud. Is it too loud? likely, but it has been measured and is below the acceptable threshold for necessary hearing protection while in the operator's seat. I putter in my shop for recreation and extra income. I run grinders, welders, saws, drills, power planes, and chainsaws. I also run my old tractor with straight exhaust. I often wear hearing protection at home, (just bought 2 more Peltor muffs, 93dB protection) but I dont like wearing them on the tractor, or when running a drill. If I have to cut something quick with the table saw, I rarely put them on there either. Is it my employers fault I have hearing loss in 15 years? Doubtful.
Having said that, Ill play along too, and answer your questions.

1) How long have you been working in your line of work? 22 years
2) While working, do you have to shout to be heard by a coworker just 3 ft away from you or close to you? no
3) Does occupational noise bother you? no
4) Since you've started working, have you experienced any symptoms of hearing loss, like ringing in the ear, pain or been diagnosed with any sort of heart disease/hearing disorder by your physician? no, I started with exceptional hearing. I have suffered from tinnitus since I was in my early teens.
5) At work, do you use any form of hearing protection when working to control noise?
yes, but minimal.
__________________
Living the country life


Learning boils down to "Repetition or the avoidance of pain", some people learn by doing, some by watching and some have to pee on the electric fence. - Norm W.

Mathew 10:36
And a man's foes shall be they of his own household
-Ironman quoting the Bible
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 11-08-2012, 09:44 PM
MotorDoctor's Avatar
MotorDoctor MotorDoctor is offline
Karma Avenger
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: NYC
Posts: 4,703
Default

Quote:
While working, do you have to shout to be heard by a coworker just 3 ft away from you or close to you? No
How about when you're conducting the 1812 overture, can you still talk normally to a co-worker Norm?
__________________
Director of Sarcasm (by appointment) Director of Innuendo (by suggestion)
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 11-08-2012, 09:58 PM
Ironman's Avatar
Ironman Ironman is offline
Iron Modification Investigator
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Warburg, Alberta, Canada
Posts: 12,878
Default

I guess aiming to prove a concept like "high noise levels hurt me" concerns me. The global warming crowd set out to prove some thing and created "facts" to support it. This leads me to feel contempt for what is called science today.

Occupational noise is something that your mind turns off after a while. I find I can think and plan and do whatever in loud noise. When I was younger, I could sleep off a hangover on the drill deck of a wagon drill with 2 drills running at 92 db each. I'd wake up when the drill changed tone and add another extension steel to the drill.

I am a miner
1) How long have you been working in your line of work?
32 years
2) While working, do you have to shout to be heard by a coworker just 3 ft away from you or close to you?
Yes
3) Does occupational noise bother you?
Only over 120 db
4) Since you've started working, have you experienced any symptoms of hearing loss, like ringing in the ear, pain or been diagnosed with any sort of heart disease/hearing disorder by your physician?
Some midrange hearing loss, heart is great.
5) At work, do you use any form of hearing protection when working to control noise?
Yes, but not in the home shop. Back in 1969 when I started underground, they had wax or cotton waste for ear plugs, that was all. Almost no one wore ear protection then.
__________________
Gerry
You got freedom of speech, if you don't say too much.
Aaron Neville

Even duct tape can't fix stupid ... But it can muffle the sound. Attributed to Red Green
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
noise, safety, survey

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Web Search:

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:54 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.