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  #21  
Old 03-08-2018, 12:55 PM
KevinF KevinF is offline
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Originally Posted by midmosandblasting View Post
Not from experience but read . On a poured slab go down on edge below frost line then out to the same width . This is supposed to stop it from freezing slab . Dr. Dean had a thread on pouring the floor in side his shop and used I thought floor heat . Maybe he will check in on how it worked .
Frost goes down 9ft some years. errrr.. 2.74m..
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  #22  
Old 03-08-2018, 01:36 PM
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I don’t have an issue with an engineered slab, I’ve likely been involved in 20-30 of them over the years, maybe more. Most though are unheated storage garages.

I’ve done some that were heated, but they didn’t bother with a thermal barrier around the outside, so it leads to cold floor around the walls, and warm ground up against the building. Not really a good thing.

Heat I’m either going to go with a gas fired space heater or infrared, but it’s relatively small, we’re only talking 20’ x 30’.

Package price I already got. 20’ x 30’, 2x6 walls, 8 x 16 door, 34” man door, truss, roof sheating with 25 year shingles, vinyl siding for the outside, and the insulation package. No interior finish material, as I’m debating what I would go with. Price was about 12,500 before tax for a place out of Edmonton.


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  #23  
Old 03-08-2018, 02:25 PM
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Originally Posted by greywynd View Post
I don’t have an issue with an engineered slab, I’ve likely been involved in 20-30 of them over the years, maybe more. Most though are unheated storage garages.

I’ve done some that were heated, but they didn’t bother with a thermal barrier around the outside, so it leads to cold floor around the walls, and warm ground up against the building. Not really a good thing.

Heat I’m either going to go with a gas fired space heater or infrared, but it’s relatively small, we’re only talking 20’ x 30’.

Package price I already got. 20’ x 30’, 2x6 walls, 8 x 16 door, 34” man door, truss, roof sheating with 25 year shingles, vinyl siding for the outside, and the insulation package. No interior finish material, as I’m debating what I would go with. Price was about 12,500 before tax for a place out of Edmonton.


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The only thing I would suggest is ditch the shingles and do a metal roof. By the way, I did have a plastic barrier put down under the concrete for the wood shop. I have a 5KW ceiling mounted forced air heater. Usually is set at the lowest temp, around 40F.
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  #24  
Old 03-08-2018, 03:36 PM
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Overall, since this is a military posting after all, I have to hit a balance on wants versus price, and keep resell and future use in mind.

Steel is great, but it is more $$$. Since our maximum time at the place will be about 12 years (her earliest retirement time) I’ll go with shingles. Someone else can decide what to put on next time.

The insulation I’m looking at the fact that we’ll be paying to heat it for, say 5-12 years, and I want it comfortable. It may end up being an income producing space, and if so, the heat will be more at working temps versus keep the frost out.


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  #25  
Old 03-08-2018, 07:51 PM
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For the record, I would NEVER put anything smaller than a 36" door on the exterior of any building. Rapping my knuckles and elbows off narrow doorways over the years has made me cranky......
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  #26  
Old 03-09-2018, 03:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greywynd View Post
I don’t have an issue with an engineered slab, I’ve likely been involved in 20-30 of them over the years, maybe more. Most though are unheated storage garages.

I’ve done some that were heated, but they didn’t bother with a thermal barrier around the outside, so it leads to cold floor around the walls, and warm ground up against the building. Not really a good thing.

Heat I’m either going to go with a gas fired space heater or infrared, but it’s relatively small, we’re only talking 20’ x 30’.

Package price I already got. 20’ x 30’, 2x6 walls, 8 x 16 door, 34” man door, truss, roof sheating with 25 year shingles, vinyl siding for the outside, and the insulation package. No interior finish material, as I’m debating what I would go with. Price was about 12,500 before tax for a place out of Edmonton.

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A garage door that wide is something I would stay away from myself. I have seen a 16' wide door header sag towards the middle and cause problems (father-in-law's garage), and eventually get replaced with two single doors with a central pillar to stop the header sag.
Something else to consider with respect to a garage with a rear or side alley is snow clearing. Here the back alleys used to be kept clear by the garbage removal contractor as the bins were at the back property line, but once they changed to individual house, front street pick up, the alleys are no longer kept clear. Right now, the one behind my house is under between 2 and 3 feet of snow and going to get deeper before spring gets here.
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  #27  
Old 03-09-2018, 05:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by camdigger View Post
For the record, I would NEVER put anything smaller than a 36" door on the exterior of any building. Rapping my knuckles and elbows off narrow doorways over the years has made me cranky......


I was thinking about that, and if it all happens, I think I’d tell them to switch it to a 36”. I’d likely look at adding a window on the door as well.


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  #28  
Old 03-09-2018, 05:28 PM
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Originally Posted by cramd View Post
A garage door that wide is something I would stay away from myself. I have seen a 16' wide door header sag towards the middle and cause problems (father-in-law's garage), and eventually get replaced with two single doors with a central pillar to stop the header sag.

Something else to consider with respect to a garage with a rear or side alley is snow clearing. Here the back alleys used to be kept clear by the garbage removal contractor as the bins were at the back property line, but once they changed to individual house, front street pick up, the alleys are no longer kept clear. Right now, the one behind my house is under between 2 and 3 feet of snow and going to get deeper before spring gets here.


Not a fan of the wide doors myself. However I think I’m stuck on a 20’ wide building. To keep it as a ‘double car garage’ for resale, I don’t have much choice.

I could squeeze two 9’ doors in, but 9’ is tight for a full size truck with mirrors etc.

A larger single door would be okay for my needs, but may cut into future use/resale some.

As to the snow, if need be I can do it myself. The alley goes along the left side of the house, and splits at the rear corner of the lot, with it also going across the back of our place. I may have to anyway, as I’ll be parking at least one trailer back there whether the shop happens or not.


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  #29  
Old 03-10-2018, 09:20 PM
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8 high by 10 wide overhead doors are great for full size pickups.

I think the minimum practical wall length for 2 10 wide doors is 24'. 18" on othe upsides of each door with a 1' pillar between the doors. IIRC, the typical door hardware covers 4" outside the opening.
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  #30  
Old 03-16-2018, 02:14 PM
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Originally Posted by camdigger View Post
8 high by 10 wide overhead doors are great for full size pickups.

I think the minimum practical wall length for 2 10 wide doors is 24'. 18" on othe upsides of each door with a 1' pillar between the doors. IIRC, the typical door hardware covers 4" outside the opening.
I would agree whole heartedly with that statement.
Mine are 8' high, but at 9' wide, care is needed when putting my 3/4 ton with trailer mirrors in to the garage for working on it (can't keep it garaged in the second bay as the truck is too long for the interior length of the garage, plus I need space for my work table, welders/hydraulic press/tool boxes etc.).
Even with the mirrors pulled in all the way, there is still not a whole lot of wiggle room going through the door unless I fold them tight against the truck door, and I don't bother doing that.
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