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Old 12-21-2009, 11:56 AM
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Default 6010 Dc+

I was reading on lincolns site that an E6010 would be run with DC+. so that means plug the electode into the + side right? And this also means reverse polarity right? And what are the advantages of straight and revers polarity? It seems like one way would penatrate more than the other.

Last edited by alchemist; 12-21-2009 at 12:06 PM.
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Old 12-21-2009, 12:47 PM
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Yep, yep. The advantage is that that is how it is made to work. If you use it on DC- it will weld, but not right. For most applications DC+ is where it is at and few people ever need to use any application other than DC+. To show yourself the differene set it up to run DC+ and run a few beads (w/ 6010 use a whipping motion) then change the polarity to DC-. you will see the difference right away.
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Old 12-21-2009, 01:35 PM
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so most of the time you would use reverse polarity? thats where I was getting confused. You would think it would be the other way around. I have always used an ac machine, I just got a dc machine so I am learning.
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Old 12-21-2009, 02:55 PM
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DCEP or Reverse Polarity is the deep digging setting. It will put more heat into the work. DCEN or Straight Polarity is a shallow penetrating setting. It puts more heat into the rod...which will be readily apparent is you stick one....it burns in half the time of DCEP. We always use DCEP/Reverse with 6010's unless running sheet metal.
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Old 12-21-2009, 08:32 PM
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I use the letters DCRP for Direct Current Reverse Polarity which also gives you the reminder of Rod Positive. DC current flows from negative to positive so in RP your current is coming from the work to the rod, this will put the heat in the rod (which you need to consume the rod, especially at lower amperages). I have found that high cellulose electrodes like 5p don't react that much to polarity changes, I have met some guys that actually run the root in straight then switch back to reverse to fill it out. I have fooled around with that but I think those guys were looking for an excuse to go to the machine as often as they could. For a really noticeable difference try running some lo-hi in straight polarity. There you will see a noticeably different bead contour. The crown will generally be higher and the bead will be narrower, and it will require a lot more amps to light up and maintain the arc. DC straight is used with the TIG (GTAW) process. As the current flows from the torch to the work, TIG will deposit more heat into the work at the same settings as a stick process. As an aside, to save you steps to and from your machine, try setting you amperage at a level that will run 1/8 5p and 3/32 lo-hi, say around 80 amps. That is a pretty typical setting for small bore pipe. Enjoy the new machine.
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Old 12-24-2009, 01:14 AM
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The way I teach my students is have them remember the House of Representatives, and the Senate, abrieviated REP and SEN.
REP being Reverse Electrode Positive, and
SEN being Straight Electrode Negative.
6011 is basically the same rod but is designed for AC/DC applications so if you only have a Home Depot bought 225 amp Lincoln buzz box AC only then 6011 is a good choice.
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Old 12-24-2009, 10:20 AM
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Thats what I remebered .. the sen and rep . But where I was getting confused was, I thought you should use straight polarity most of the time. It just seems like doing something in reverse would be the alternative to the regular way. While we are on the subject..What are the advantages of dc over ac. I have used a tombstone all of my welding life ( since I was a kid )And just started trying dc for the first time. What I notice ( or it could be my imagination) is that with dc it seems like you can get closer to the work without the rod sticking so i can use a lower amperage on thiner material. Other than that I haven't picked up on the differance. Mabey if I had been brought up on dc and switched to ac The differance might be more noticable? I have only ran mabey twenty to thirty rods dc so far. ( 6011 )
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Old 12-24-2009, 07:25 PM
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DC is the industry standard. All the commonly used procedures written for the pressure vessel, power piping, unfired vessel, repair, etc ASME codes use DCRP as the current when stick welding. I am guessing there are a million reasons the engineers chose DCRP but I'm sure it comes down to arc characteristics and of those, stability is probably the prime reason. Of course in AC the polarity is switching at what ever cycle the machine is producing ( 60 ), where as DC is a constant flow of current from neg. to pos. The flow will vary some but a DCCC machine works to maintain current by varying voltage. Arc stability is pretty important in making consistent quality welds, if that variable is managed by the machine and process, that leaves one less variable for the welder to try and overcome.
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Old 12-24-2009, 08:54 PM
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so basically for what I do...makeing stuff around the house out of whatever I have available;and it doesn't have to meet any specs, it doesn't really matter?
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Old 12-24-2009, 09:42 PM
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I won't matter for fast freeze elctrodes like 6010 or 6011. If you want to run lo-hi, like 7018 than you will get your best results with DCRP.
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