Shop Floor Talk  

Go Back   Shop Floor Talk > Welding and Metalworking Forums > Fabrication

SFT Search:   
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old 07-21-2014, 02:11 PM
camdigger's Avatar
camdigger camdigger is offline
Roving Reporter
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Central Oilberta
Posts: 4,199
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cutter View Post
Well now, that's a handsome little feller.
It seems like that was a pretty quick project even with the missing parts snafu?
Well, it was pretty quick, but I still have to install the grouser kit. IIRC, each track has 29 grouser shoes with 3 bolts each. Almost 175 bolts.

Not including removing the home made parts and installing the OEM stuff.

It was neat to see the look on the kid's faces when they drove it around after seeing it evolve from a heap of parts over a few days.
__________________
Design to 0.001", measure to 1/32", cut with an axe, grind to fit..
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 07-21-2014, 02:25 PM
camdigger's Avatar
camdigger camdigger is offline
Roving Reporter
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Central Oilberta
Posts: 4,199
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by milomilo View Post
A real nifty toy! Is it a belt drive or hydrostatic?
Here's a snapshot of the guts...
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCN3100.jpg
Views:	505
Size:	97.0 KB
ID:	117251  
__________________
Design to 0.001", measure to 1/32", cut with an axe, grind to fit..
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 07-21-2014, 02:47 PM
Norm W's Avatar
Norm W Norm W is offline
Elite Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Syracuse, NY
Posts: 3,023
Default

Here are a couple of pictures of the 1969 version. The fellow in picture one builds rat-rod trucks. The one in picture two is a certain North American Marsupial.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCF0125.jpg
Views:	472
Size:	100.2 KB
ID:	117254   Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCF0329.jpg
Views:	500
Size:	99.9 KB
ID:	117255  
__________________
Make over, make do, or do without

Why do I have to press one for English when you're just gonna transfer me to someone I can't understand anyway?

Grant me the strength to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can & the friends to post my bail when I finally snap!
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 07-21-2014, 03:25 PM
milomilo's Avatar
milomilo milomilo is offline
Auction Addict
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Wheatland, Wyoming
Posts: 18,838
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by camdigger View Post
Here's a snapshot of the guts...
That looks to be a stout setup. Have to post some heavy work pics when you get time. What do you think it is capable of using the rippers?
__________________
Chris

One of the penalties for refusing to participate in politics is that you end up being governed by your inferiors. Plato

LET'S GO BRANDON!!!!

B biggest
I idot
D democrats
E ever
N nominated
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 07-21-2014, 08:40 PM
projectnut projectnut is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Madison Wisconsin
Posts: 74
Default

Cam, like you I have been interested in the Struck tracked machines since they came out in the 1960's. Before building the Cadtrac I tried to buy a kit from them. At the time they would only sell complete machines. I wrote them several times trying to buy a kit, but they weren't interested.

I built the Cadtrac with the intention of using it on a property we have in central Wisconsin. I quickly found out the high center of gravity, the articulating chassis, and overall height of the machine gave me problems on the wooded hilly terrain.

I took the Cadtrac back home and replaced it with an older Case 224 garden tractor. Again I found it wasn't the best machine for the job. It quickly lost traction when pulling heavy loads up the steep hills.

Now that you've completed your latest machine can you tell me how it compares to the Cadtrac as far as power and agility are concerned? I'm really interested in the machine if it can handle a heavy load and climb wooded hills. It looks like it would fit the bill perfectly, but I don't think I could convince the wife another one is necessary if it doesn't perform any better than the ones I already have.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 07-22-2014, 01:37 AM
camdigger's Avatar
camdigger camdigger is offline
Roving Reporter
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Central Oilberta
Posts: 4,199
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by projectnut View Post
Cam, like you I have been interested in the Struck tracked machines since they came out in the 1960's. Before building the Cadtrac I tried to buy a kit from them. At the time they would only sell complete machines. I wrote them several times trying to buy a kit, but they weren't interested.

I built the Cadtrac with the intention of using it on a property we have in central Wisconsin. I quickly found out the high center of gravity, the articulating chassis, and overall height of the machine gave me problems on the wooded hilly terrain.

I took the Cadtrac back home and replaced it with an older Case 224 garden tractor. Again I found it wasn't the best machine for the job. It quickly lost traction when pulling heavy loads up the steep hills.

Now that you've completed your latest machine can you tell me how it compares to the Cadtrac as far as power and agility are concerned? I'm really interested in the machine if it can handle a heavy load and climb wooded hills. It looks like it would fit the bill perfectly, but I don't think I could convince the wife another one is necessary if it doesn't perform any better than the ones I already have.
PN

The Camtrac and Struck dozer are different machines for sure. So far, I have less than 1 hour on the mini dozer, and a couple hundred on the Camtrac.

On the plus side, the mini dozer is more agile, especially in the models that can counter rotate the tracks. The mini dozers have a deeper reduction in the drive train for more push. Mini dozers have steel tracks for less ground pressure and aggressive traction. With a lower overall height, the mini dozers have a lower centre of gravity.

On the down side, the mini dozer is slower even than the Cadtracs as designed, much less your machine with the increased hydraulic flow. With its steel tracks, the mini dozer is very hard on grass and lawn. The steel tracks and sprockets give a rough ride on hard surfaces. The mini dozer, like the original Cadtrac design has a poor braking system. The lever is a bit awkward to operate and seems to be intended for emergency and parking use. On the RS kit, only the LHS track is braked. The RS 1000 has more hp and dual brakes. The brakes on both machines are mechanically activated discs.

IMHO, from what you've said, you might be happier with a hydro drive machine. Having built the Cadtrac and using the plans from the older minis I would think you would be able to put in a couple small hyd motors coupled direct to the final drive pinion sprocket and come up with a powerful, versatile machine.

I was hung up a long time on the track design. Having seen the Struck design, I was surprised to find the track shoes welded directly to the edge of the chain link side plates. From the consistent welds, I think it may have been robot welded or migged by a skilled operator. I think they chose the 550K chain as much for the straight side plates as any other reason. The other thing I discovered is that after cutting the drive sprockets out of plate, they bent the teeth in almost 1/8" toward the center of the track. This would give the track a bit less tendency to ride up on the teeth in turns.

On another note, If I had an older hydrostat garden tractor (the 224 I found on tractor data was a hydro) I wasn't happy with, I'd give some thought to putting tracks on it. The rear axles could drive the pinion sprocket and the track frame could be put together and slid under the Case as a unit. Steering would be managed with independent wheel brakes. With some careful design, the conversion could be fully reversible.

Frankly, if I had more time to play and modify, I would have done the mods on one of the tractors I have, but the best candidate, an old JD112?, is a basket case and would need a lot of work to get to the stage where it would be ready for the track modification. The other possibility would be to convert the mini crawler I made before to steel tracks. The smaller track sprockets would go a long way to solving the speed issues I had with it.

I was looking for a fast project for me and the kids to build and end up with another toy, Ahem, piece of yard care equipment, they would feel vested in as they helped assemble it. Aside from the missing parts from the kit, it was a complete success. I think the investment was well worth it for that alone. It opened my son's eyes that stuff can be built with stuff other than Lego, and he got some experience with hand tools - not something he'd done before to any great amount. #1 daughter learned a few things too. I don't think they learned any new vocabulary, but it was a near thing a couple of times.
__________________
Design to 0.001", measure to 1/32", cut with an axe, grind to fit..

Last edited by camdigger; 07-22-2014 at 02:43 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 07-22-2014, 04:04 AM
Gazza's Avatar
Gazza Gazza is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Melbourne Australia
Posts: 110
Default

Talking about home built mini dozers, I think this is one of the best
http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/s...d.php?t=132812
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	mini dozer.jpg
Views:	345
Size:	35.0 KB
ID:	117259  
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 07-22-2014, 09:22 AM
Ironman's Avatar
Ironman Ironman is offline
Iron Modification Investigator
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Warburg, Alberta, Canada
Posts: 16,673
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Norm W View Post
Here are a couple of pictures of the 1969 version. The fellow in picture one builds rat-rod trucks. The one in picture two is a certain North American Marsupial.
That's a rare picture, GNAP's usually hide from people. probably going to dig a new cave with that cat.

Cam, I suspect the homemade parts, especially bushings on your crawler are better made to tolerance than the factory ones. I am surprised to see the blade is an armstrong control instead of hydraulic, but I guess it keeps the cost down. I would think a power steering pump and little cylinders would be a nice modification.
Is that little bugger any good for pushing snow?
Your paint story wind chimes is something like many of mine, and I hate battling with the suicidal bugs when I paint.
__________________
Gerry
You got freedom of speech, if you don't say too much.
Aaron Neville.

When a liberal screams racism, you can bet they were also born with white skin.

The countries whom the gods would destroy they first make green. Rex Murphy
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 07-22-2014, 10:42 AM
DrBob's Avatar
DrBob DrBob is offline
I fear I'll do some damage one fine day
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: New York
Posts: 1,423
Default Paint-o-phobia

Quote:
Originally Posted by cutter View Post
Have I ever mentioned that I don't like painting?
Comes as a surprise to me!

DrBob

Looks like a fun toy, Cam!

Last edited by DrBob; 07-22-2014 at 11:41 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 07-22-2014, 11:52 AM
weldor2005's Avatar
weldor2005 weldor2005 is offline
Perpetuus Discipulus de Vita
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Marinette, WI - Menominee, MI
Posts: 2,903
Default

Stupid bugs! Nice looking toys, if only I could afford more than a shovel!
__________________
David

Finch Fabrication
My YouTube Channel

"Of all of our inventions for mass communication, pictures still speak the most universally understood language." - Walt Disney

"Formal education will make you a living;
Self education will make you a fortune." - Jim Rohn
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Web Search:

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:17 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, vBulletin Solutions Inc.